5 baby gear essentials

I asked on Facebook and Twitter about essential baby gear: There’s so much Stuff you can buy when preparing to welcome a baby, but most of us don’t really need most of it. What one or two baby items would you recommend a new parent definitely get?

The answers revealed that gear for babywearing, diapering, and feeding were most important to you, followed by bundling up baby and a place for baby to rest:

  1. Babywearing. By far the most popular advice is to get a good carrier, Ergo, sling, or wrap to wear baby. “A baby wrap! That is the one and only tool you need!” “Our ergo has paid back every penny we spent on it in spades.” “A really good baby carrier that goes under the butt rather than through the legs.” 

    By Dynam0tv (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

  2. Diapering. Diapers, wipes, and diaper cream. Lots of people suggested cloth diapers. “and i really liked my wipe warmer. it seems silly, but when you have a fussy, high needs baby who hates diaper changes, its really nice to have. even if you do EC at some point.”
  3. Feeding. Water bottle for mom, breast pads, breastfeeding bra, nursing tops, bottle warmer, bottle rack, a boppy pillow, recliner. “I never used bottle rack or warmer… I have two bottle rack/warmers that are built in, always ready and on tap.” 
  4. Bundling. Baby clothes, some warm rather than cute clothes, baby hat, swaddler, blankets, sheets, towels, any other soft goods.  
  5. Resting. Pack n play or baby swing. “The Goddess provided us with everything they need. Arms to hold them. Hips to sit on.” 

Also, a few people suggested getting support instead of gear in preparation for baby:

  • “Honestly, the best “thing” people can buy is support for mama. Set up a fund for a lactation consultant and a postpartum doula, or set up a rotation to help mom out.”
  • “Local trained lactation support. Even if you decide not to breastfeed, that support can be helpful since your milk will come in anyway.”
  • Doulas, supportive family and friends, whatever you need to get you through those first few tough weeks!”
  • “I’d suggest looking into EC.”

About Sarah Whedon

Sarah Whedon is founding editor of Pagan Families, the author of Birth on the Labyrinth Path: Sacred Embodiment in the Childbearing Year, and former Chair of the Department of Theology and Religious History at Cherry Hill Seminary. Sarah’s teaching, research, and advocacy work center around topics of spirituality, feminism, and reproduction. She makes her home in the Boston area with her partner and their children.


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