Movie Review: A Thousand Words

In the Pagan community, there is a saying that words have power therefore we need to be cautious of what we say. The Universe or a Deity might grant our wish in unexpected ways. The comedy A Thousand Words offers a reminder that people often throw words around meaninglessly.

Eddie Murphy plays Jack McCall a self centered, fast talking, literary agent who will say anything to get his way. He even wants to keep his home styled like a bachelor pad despite having a wife and child. He cuts in lines and exaggerates enlightenment so he can sign the famous spiritual guru Dr. Sinja (Cliff Curtis from Whale Rider). A Bodhi rises up in his backyard and he discovers that for every word he says, leaves drop from the tree. Jack, being linked with the tree, will die if the tree dies.

Murphy is a great face actor and he pulls off so many laughs without even speaking. Clark Duke (who also played in Kick Ass) does a great job of playing the insecure assistant to Murphy.

The movie’s reviews, when it was released in March, were mainly negative. The writers were disappointed that Murphy didn’t have as many cocky lines as he did in other films. They also didn’t understand the more mystical aspects.

What “A Thousand Words” needs is some sort of a mystical score card to keep track of Jack’s status in the universe. The guru who wrote the book, Dr. Sinja (Cliff Curtis), apparently knows something about this bodhi tree, but never explains the rules. When Jack finally apparently redeems himself, it seems to be by instinct or good luck. I say “apparently” because, as heaven’s my witness, I’m not completely sure if Jack is alive, dead or reincarnated at the end of the movie. You could build a case for all three. Roger Ebert

What Mr. Ebert doesn’t understand is Sinja can’t explain exactly what Jack needs to do to reconcile the situation. In life we have to walk our own path and look inward to see what needs to be healed and this is ultimately what Jack has to do. There were plenty of misty eyed moments for me. I can see how a critic who hasn’t been in rituals or meditations where they communicate with their younger or past self wouldn’t understand those scenes in the film. The writer and director could have offered more explanation.

Don’t worry about what the critics have said about this film. Check it out and maybe you’ll enjoy it as much as I did.

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A Thousand Words movie trailer staring Eddie Murphy.

About Tara "Masery" Miller

Tara "Masery" Miller is a Neo-Pagan panentheist Gaian mage living in the Ozarks with her husband and pets. She's also a member of the Unitarian Universalist Church. She is the editor of Rooted in the Body, Seeking the Soul which you can find at Immanion press. www.immanion-press.com/info/books.asp She has a minor is religion from Southeast Missouri State Missouri State University with an emphasis in mysticism. Masery has lead various groups over the years and organized Pagan Pride Day events. Her magic and author page is at www.taramaserymiller.com

  • Sharmine Sanchez

    I have read a few reviews on how awful the movie is but the message the movie presents I think is a great message. My mother always told me if I don’t have anything nice to say don’t say anything at all. Based off your review I know A Thousands Words starring Eddie Murphy would be the kind of movie I would like. Luckily I ordered it on Blockbuster @Home sp it should be coming in the mail soon. I knew a few of my Dish co-workers told me it’s a good movie and just to watch it so I can’t wait.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/paganswithdisabilities/ Tara “Masery” Miller

      I enjoy watching movies at home. I can pause and not miss anything when I need to get a drink or snack refill etc. I can also curl up with the fuzzy pets and my equally fuzzy husband. He has a bushy red beard. One way I’m working on my depression issues is to watch more uplifting shows and read inspirational books. That means giving up this season of True Blood and other shows like Supernatural. I’m feeling better though and that’s what matters.

  • SHEENA KHRISTEL YONGCO

    may i know how did the writter tell the culture of the place in the story–


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