Morality on a Bun: Chick-fil-A is Anti-Gay

Here in the South we have a fast food joint called Chick-fil-A. Fried chicken, waffle fries and the best vanilla soft serve ice cream on the planet. They have cute commercials and ads featuring barely literate cows. Oh and they “don’t accept homosexual couples.”

You see, the tasty chicken joint that’s famously closed on Sunday has a charitable branch called the WinShape Foundation, which runs a retreat which expressly prohibits homosexual couples. Plus they often give money to anti-gay organizations. Of course, this money they are giving to anti-gay organizations comes from every person who likes peanut-oil fried chicken nuggets with polynesian sauce. Yup, if you eat at Chick-fil-A this money comes from you.

I had already stopped purchasing drinks from them (which if you know the food industry you know that’s their highest profit item) because they use styrofoam cups. Morally, I can’t use styrofoam. It’s against what I believe in: a clean earth. So now that Chick-fil-A has been revealed as actively working against my homosexual friends and their basic rights, I will no longer patronize their business at all.

I think we have a moral responsibility to use our purchasing power wisely. In my small town there’s a significant gay community and a significant number of liberals. In a town this small alienating a significant percentage of the population will really hurt you, especially in this economy.

As a Pagan not only many of my friends are gay, but also many of my coven members, my elders, and yes, even my Gods, are gay. I’m not particularly close to Zeus, for instance, but I certainly have no interest in incurring his wrath.

The sad thing I had always admired that Chik-fil-A stood up for it’s values by closing every Sunday. I had a lot of respect for that. The fact that they don’t respect their customers makes me regret every dollar I spent there. Is this a sacrifice? Well, I don’t suppose so. There is a Zaxby’s right down the street. Mmmm… I could eat a Zalad right now…

About Star Foster

Polytheistic Wiccan initiated into the Ravenwood tradition, she has many opinions. Some of them are actually useful.

  • Chill

    chill the fuck out

  • The Norse Alchemist

    Well, I can’t say that I like it they’re “anti-gay” though I can’t say I’m all that surprised. They’re closed on Sunday, and they’re obviously owned by Christians.

    I support Everyone having the right to practice what they believe (at least, until they try to kill me or force their way of life on me). That means I support the rights of gay people and I support the right of the owners here to support whatever causes they want to. I’m not going to stand and judge that someone’s morality is greater than anothers’ or that someone’s rights are more important than anothers’.

    Support who you will, but beware bashing the other party. Rights go both ways, and no one is more right than another.

    • http://twitter.com/skullaria skullaria

      I think it is acceptable that they can run their business how they see fit. If they discriminate against employees and get sued again, they can continue to settle it out of court if they want.

      I however, don’t have to spend money there, and I can inform my friends as to why I made that decision.

    • http://worksofliterata.wordpress.com Literata

      Actually, Norse Alchemist, some people are more right than others. Abolitionists who called for the end of slavery were more right. Activists who called for the rights of white people and black people to marry each other were more right. And so on.

      If you mean that no one has more rights than anyone else, that’s true. But it’s also a tautology; human rights come from being human, and thus we all have them, equally. If what you meant is that one person’s rights can’t infringe on another’s, that’s simply ignoring the reality that sometimes different rights are in conflict with each other. Yes, the Christians behind Chik-Fil-A have rights to their religion and its practices, and their interpretation of their religion condemns homosexuality. But most anti-gay organizations in this country (Star doesn’t mention specifically which ones they fund) are working to deny gay people basic rights, such as the right to nondiscrimination in employment and housing, or hospital visitation, let alone marriage. We call those rights basic because when those rights conflict with others, we tend to privilege basic rights.

      The balancing act of handling overlaps and conflicts of rights is a delicate one and is constantly in a state of flux. But don’t oversimplify the matter by saying that no one is more right than any other or that no one’s rights can impact someone else’s rights. Recognizing those complexities and negotiating them is part of the challenge of living in a freer society.

      • http://twitter.com/thesilverspiral Naya Aerodiode

        You can dislike someone all you want, but you can’t deny them the same rights as everyone else because of it.

    • http://www.patheos.com Star Foster

      I don’t support the right to discriminate. There are evangelical Christians who support gay rights. We’re doing a feature on one of them, Jay Bakker (son of Jim and Tammy Faye) in the Patheos Book Club.

      Gay rights are equal rights, not special rights. There’s a big difference.

    • Cigfran

      Two points:

      I am not a thoroughgoing cultural relativist. I believe in objective right and wrong. I also believe that I am as free to express my objection to someone’s behavior at least as robustly as they express their contempt for me through those behaviors.

      I am also sick and tired of the idea of “tolerance” in the broader debate over the rights of gay people to function normally in society. Screw tolerance. The world is full of people who I don’t “tolerate” in the sense that their behaviors and beliefs are repugnant to me. But I don’t exercise power over them… I don’t turn my distaste into oppression. In turn, I don’t really care about anyone’s “tolerance.” I do require, however, that I am not hindered in the course of my life.

      Don’t tolerate me… just get the hell out of my way.

    • http://twilightandfire.wordpress.com Elizabeth

      The right to fair housing, fair employment, and to marry another consenting adult are not “special treatment.” All Americans should have these rights. LBGT folks do not need to “accept” other people’s intolerance of our very right to exist, or refrain from criticizing people who try to keep us from having those rights.

  • The Norse Alchemist

    Well, I can’t say that I like it they’re “anti-gay” though I can’t say I’m all that surprised. They’re closed on Sunday, and they’re obviously owned by Christians.

    I support Everyone having the right to practice what they believe (at least, until they try to kill me or force their way of life on me). That means I support the rights of gay people and I support the right of the owners here to support whatever causes they want to. I’m not going to stand and judge that someone’s morality is greater than anothers’ or that someone’s rights are more important than anothers’.

    Support who you will, but beware bashing the other party. Rights go both ways, and no one is more right than another.

    • http://twitter.com/skullaria skullaria

      I think it is acceptable that they can run their business how they see fit. If they discriminate against employees and get sued again, they can continue to settle it out of court if they want.

      I however, don’t have to spend money there, and I can inform my friends as to why I made that decision.

    • Literata

      Actually, Norse Alchemist, some people are more right than others. Abolitionists who called for the end of slavery were more right. Activists who called for the rights of white people and black people to marry each other were more right. And so on.

      If you mean that no one has more rights than anyone else, that’s true. But it’s also a tautology; human rights come from being human, and thus we all have them, equally. If what you meant is that one person’s rights can’t infringe on another’s, that’s simply ignoring the reality that sometimes different rights are in conflict with each other. Yes, the Christians behind Chik-Fil-A have rights to their religion and its practices, and their interpretation of their religion condemns homosexuality. But most anti-gay organizations in this country (Star doesn’t mention specifically which ones they fund) are working to deny gay people basic rights, such as the right to nondiscrimination in employment and housing, or hospital visitation, let alone marriage. We call those rights basic because when those rights conflict with others, we tend to privilege basic rights.

      The balancing act of handling overlaps and conflicts of rights is a delicate one and is constantly in a state of flux. But don’t oversimplify the matter by saying that no one is more right than any other or that no one’s rights can impact someone else’s rights. Recognizing those complexities and negotiating them is part of the challenge of living in a freer society.

      • http://twitter.com/thesilverspiral Naya Aerodiode

        You can dislike someone all you want, but you can’t deny them the same rights as everyone else because of it.

    • http://www.patheos.com/ Star Foster

      I don’t support the right to discriminate. There are evangelical Christians who support gay rights. We’re doing a feature on one of them, Jay Bakker (son of Jim and Tammy Faye) in the Patheos Book Club.

      Gay rights are equal rights, not special rights. There’s a big difference.

    • Cigfran

      Two points:

      I am not a thoroughgoing cultural relativist. I believe in objective right and wrong. I also believe that I am as free to express my objection to someone’s behavior at least as robustly as they express their contempt for me through those behaviors.

      I am also sick and tired of the idea of “tolerance” in the broader debate over the rights of gay people to function normally in society. Screw tolerance. The world is full of people who I don’t “tolerate” in the sense that their behaviors and beliefs are repugnant to me. But I don’t exercise power over them… I don’t turn my distaste into oppression. In turn, I don’t really care about anyone’s “tolerance.” I do require, however, that I am not hindered in the course of my life.

      Don’t tolerate me… just get the hell out of my way.

    • http://twilightandfire.wordpress.com Elizabeth

      The right to fair housing, fair employment, and to marry another consenting adult are not “special treatment.” All Americans should have these rights. LBGT folks do not need to “accept” other people’s intolerance of our very right to exist, or refrain from criticizing people who try to keep us from having those rights.

  • Tcall13

    More power to you if that is how you feel. But I hope that all gays and their supporters will accept the fact that many religious (and even philosophical) views are opposed to homosexuality. Tolerance and respect for others needs to go both ways.

    • http://www.patheos.com Star Foster

      Tolerance has it’s limits. Do we tolerate racism? Sexism? Should we tolerate the KKK? Westboro Baptist?

      Every time Barack Obama gives a speech, should we give equal time to a White Supremacist to explain why he feels Obama is unfit for office?

      I think not. I’m not against Truett Cathy’s religion, I’m against his anti-gay activism. He doesn’t simply believe gays don’t deserve equal rights he is actively trying to prevent them from having equal rights. He is devoting money and time to preventing people from having the same rights as the rest of us.

      • http://worksofliterata.wordpress.com Literata

        Thanks, Star, for being so clear about the issues involved.

      • Tcall13

        You are comparing people who object to homosexuality to racists, sexists, and the KKK? Not to mention the Westboro crowd?

        What you refer to as “anti-gay activism” has been part of Christian religious and philosophical belief for two millennia. It is an integral of Christian teachings regarding marriage and human sexuality.

        I have no problem with you disagreeing with it. There is a great deal of religious doctrine I find issue with. But when you say that tolerance doesn’t extend to people of faith if they dare to speak or offer support on behalf of their beliefs, you are really close to saying – ” It is OK to be an anti – Christian bigot, if the Christian does not act as I think he should “.

        Don’t go there. Both sides need to respect each other’s humanity, and their right to believe as they wish.

        • http://www.patheos.com Star Foster

          Racism and misogyny wer part of Christian thought for two millennia as well. Slavery was supported by Christian doctrine as was the oppression of women. Believing something for a long time does not make it right. I’m thankful that Christians like John Shelby Spong and Jay Bakker are speaking out on this issue, because it’s based on flimsy Biblical arguments and is rooted in hatred and fear.

        • Cigfran

          You are reducing the hatred, oppression and violence directed against gays in the name of “religious belief” to mere objection?

          I am under no obligation to tolerate or respect anyone who seeks my erasure.

    • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius Platonicus

      Tcall13: “Tolerance and respect for others needs to go both ways.”

      In other words, tolerance must be mutual. Therefore, there is no need to even attempt to extend tolerance (in the sense that Tcall13 means) to those who voluntarily withdraw from this mutuality.

      Strictly speaking (that is, in the proper sense of tolerance, as opposed to respect), though, “religions opposed to homosexuality” must be tolerated, that is, they must be protected from any kind of outright discrimination (how ironic) or any kind of persecution. This is necessary if we are to have genuine religious freedom.

      However, all religions should be subject to criticism, including harsh criticism, including ridicule. This is necessary if we are to have genuine freedom of expression.

      No ideology automatically deserves respect just because some people “believe” in it.

  • Tcall13

    More power to you if that is how you feel. But I hope that all gays and their supporters will accept the fact that many religious (and even philosophical) views are opposed to homosexuality. Tolerance and respect for others needs to go both ways.

    • http://www.patheos.com/ Star Foster

      Tolerance has it’s limits. Do we tolerate racism? Sexism? Should we tolerate the KKK? Westboro Baptist?

      Every time Barack Obama gives a speech, should we give equal time to a White Supremacist to explain why he feels Obama is unfit for office?

      I think not. I’m not against Truett Cathy’s religion, I’m against his anti-gay activism. He doesn’t simply believe gays don’t deserve equal rights he is actively trying to prevent them from having equal rights. He is devoting money and time to preventing people from having the same rights as the rest of us.

      • Literata

        Thanks, Star, for being so clear about the issues involved.

      • Tcall13

        You are comparing people who object to homosexuality to racists, sexists, and the KKK? Not to mention the Westboro crowd?

        What you refer to as “anti-gay activism” has been part of Christian religious and philosophical belief for two millennia. It is an integral of Christian teachings regarding marriage and human sexuality.

        I have no problem with you disagreeing with it. There is a great deal of religious doctrine I find issue with. But when you say that tolerance doesn’t extend to people of faith if they dare to speak or offer support on behalf of their beliefs, you are really close to saying – ” It is OK to be an anti – Christian bigot, if the Christian does not act as I think he should “.

        Don’t go there. Both sides need to respect each other’s humanity, and their right to believe as they wish.

        • http://www.patheos.com/ Star Foster

          Racism and misogyny wer part of Christian thought for two millennia as well. Slavery was supported by Christian doctrine as was the oppression of women. Believing something for a long time does not make it right. I’m thankful that Christians like John Shelby Spong and Jay Bakker are speaking out on this issue, because it’s based on flimsy Biblical arguments and is rooted in hatred and fear.

        • Cigfran

          You are reducing the hatred, oppression and violence directed against gays in the name of “religious belief” to mere objection?

          I am under no obligation to tolerate or respect anyone who seeks my erasure.

    • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius Platonicus

      Tcall13: “Tolerance and respect for others needs to go both ways.”

      In other words, tolerance must be mutual. Therefore, there is no need to even attempt to extend tolerance (in the sense that Tcall13 means) to those who voluntarily withdraw from this mutuality.

      Strictly speaking (that is, in the proper sense of tolerance, as opposed to respect), though, “religions opposed to homosexuality” must be tolerated, that is, they must be protected from any kind of outright discrimination (how ironic) or any kind of persecution. This is necessary if we are to have genuine religious freedom.

      However, all religions should be subject to criticism, including harsh criticism, including ridicule. This is necessary if we are to have genuine freedom of expression.

      No ideology automatically deserves respect just because some people “believe” in it.

  • Laura M. LaVoie

    I suppose in their own way, Chik Fil A is *still* standing up for their values. They are fundamentalist Christian and therefore don’t approve of homosexuality. I disagree with that position, of course, but it is consistent with their world view.

    That being said, I think they are merely a symptom of the problem, not the disease. From an employment law angle, it is not illegal to discriminate against gays in the workplace. “Gay” doesn’t fall under what is referred to as a “Protected Class”. Until we change our perceptions and the law, companies can do whatever they want to in this regard. There have been some steps in this direction, like repealing Don’t Ask Don’t Tell and, as someone else mentioned recently, enacting the Matthew Sheppard Act. We have a long way to go.

    • Laura M. LaVoie

      amendment – apparently the EEOC does recognize sexual orientation. Funny, I learned my employment law mainly in Georgia where I have actually been TOLD it wasn’t a protected class. Check me out learning something after 11 years in the staffing industry. Not that I would have discriminated in the first place.

      Still, I maintain my point that Chick Fil A can, in fact, run their business the way they want to but I don’t have to patronize them because of their policies.

      • Laura M. LaVoie

        amendment to my amendment –
        No, I was right. EEOC laws can very state by state. Not all states recognize sexual orientation as a protected class. Sorry to hijack the post here.

        • http://www.patheos.com Star Foster

          No, you’re right. GA law gives basically no protections. I worked for a company who fired 90% of the people over 30 and there wasn’t anything we could do about it.

          • Laura M. LaVoie

            There is a difference between “At Will Employment” and EEOC. If a person feels they have been discriminated against rather than simply “fired for no reason” they have to be able to prove it. Most states are At Will which means the employment can be terminated by either party for any reason at any time. This protects the employee too or else you could be held liable for quitting. Discrimination is a totally different issue.

  • Laura M. LaVoie

    I suppose in their own way, Chik Fil A is *still* standing up for their values. They are fundamentalist Christian and therefore don’t approve of homosexuality. I disagree with that position, of course, but it is consistent with their world view.

    That being said, I think they are merely a symptom of the problem, not the disease. From an employment law angle, it is not illegal to discriminate against gays in the workplace. “Gay” doesn’t fall under what is referred to as a “Protected Class”. Until we change our perceptions and the law, companies can do whatever they want to in this regard. There have been some steps in this direction, like repealing Don’t Ask Don’t Tell and, as someone else mentioned recently, enacting the Matthew Sheppard Act. We have a long way to go.

    • Laura M. LaVoie

      amendment – apparently the EEOC does recognize sexual orientation. Funny, I learned my employment law mainly in Georgia where I have actually been TOLD it wasn’t a protected class. Check me out learning something after 11 years in the staffing industry. Not that I would have discriminated in the first place.

      Still, I maintain my point that Chick Fil A can, in fact, run their business the way they want to but I don’t have to patronize them because of their policies.

      • Laura M. LaVoie

        amendment to my amendment –
        No, I was right. EEOC laws can very state by state. Not all states recognize sexual orientation as a protected class. Sorry to hijack the post here.

        • http://www.patheos.com/ Star Foster

          No, you’re right. GA law gives basically no protections. I worked for a company who fired 90% of the people over 30 and there wasn’t anything we could do about it.

          • Laura M. LaVoie

            There is a difference between “At Will Employment” and EEOC. If a person feels they have been discriminated against rather than simply “fired for no reason” they have to be able to prove it. Most states are At Will which means the employment can be terminated by either party for any reason at any time. This protects the employee too or else you could be held liable for quitting. Discrimination is a totally different issue.

  • http://twitter.com/thesilverspiral Naya Aerodiode

    Target was caught giving lots of money to anti gay politicians. They said they quit, but like a heroin addict, it was just something they said to get you to stop bothering them about their ugly little habit. They’re still handing money to anti gay politicians. Vote with your wallet and MAKE SURE that the companies know you are doing that. Chick Fil A and Target both got letters from me explaining exactly why I’ll be patronizing their competitors.

  • http://twitter.com/thesilverspiral Naya Aerodiode

    Target was caught giving lots of money to anti gay politicians. They said they quit, but like a heroin addict, it was just something they said to get you to stop bothering them about their ugly little habit. They’re still handing money to anti gay politicians. Vote with your wallet and MAKE SURE that the companies know you are doing that. Chick Fil A and Target both got letters from me explaining exactly why I’ll be patronizing their competitors.

  • jdhortwort

    Sadly, I’m not surprised.

  • jdhortwort

    Sadly, I’m not surprised.

  • Acotgw

    Good job Star! I enjoy your writings.

  • Acotgw

    Good job Star! I enjoy your writings.

  • Bigt

    You either suck it or don’t suck it, but don’t try to “MAKE” me support your right to suck it.

    • http://twilightandfire.wordpress.com Elizabeth

      Fine. Then don’t try to “make” me support your right to be a bigot.

  • http://twilightandfire.wordpress.com Elizabeth

    Fine. Then don’t try to “make” me support your right to be a bigot.

  • Dryder2

    I am so tired of intolerance.

  • Dryder2

    I am so tired of intolerance.

  • http://twitter.com/thesilverspiral Naya Aerodiode

    http://dantcathy.com/Connect.aspx

    Let the head of Chick Fil A know that you won’t be patronizing his restaurant and why.

  • http://twitter.com/thesilverspiral Naya Aerodiode

    http://dantcathy.com/Connect.aspx

    Let the head of Chick Fil A know that you won’t be patronizing his restaurant and why.

  • johnnydilznik

    Another reason why your in-tolerance in the LGBT community makes me less and less interested in your cause. The more you make out of these little instances the more you lose support. If you want acceptance try not walking your life-partner down the street in a dog collar, chaps and nipple-clamps attached to a leash. I will vote against any positive legislation for gays simply because you are the most intolerant group around. Second only to muslim extremist.

    • http://www.patheos.com Star Foster

      First of all, I am straight. I am a woman who likes men. A LOT. And I’m the author of this post.

      Secondly, I think you have the gay community and the kink community confused. Just because some women wear blue shoes doesn’t mean all women wear blue shoes.

      Thirdly, how less absurd is this from Christian groups boycotting stores who say Happy Holidays? Supporting businesses that support your community only makes sense.

      Finally, you are being rude without cause. Consider this a warning.

  • johnnydilznik

    Another reason why your in-tolerance in the LGBT community makes me less and less interested in your cause. The more you make out of these little instances the more you lose support. If you want acceptance try not walking your life-partner down the street in a dog collar, chaps and nipple-clamps attached to a leash. I will vote against any positive legislation for gays simply because you are the most intolerant group around. Second only to muslim extremist.

    • http://www.patheos.com/ Star Foster

      First of all, I am straight. I am a woman who likes men. A LOT. And I’m the author of this post.

      Secondly, I think you have the gay community and the kink community confused. Just because some women wear blue shoes doesn’t mean all women wear blue shoes.

      Thirdly, how less absurd is this from Christian groups boycotting stores who say Happy Holidays? Supporting businesses that support your community only makes sense.

      Finally, you are being rude without cause. Consider this a warning.

  • johnnydilznik

    I am on my way to Chick fil A to order about a $100 worth of food. I am going to take it to the local Target and hand it out as I stroll the isle and enrich them. Thanks for the info Naya. Without it I might have gone to Millions of Milkshakes in West Hollywood and funneled money to in-tolerants who demand tolerance.

  • johnnydilznik

    I am on my way to Chick fil A to order about a $100 worth of food. I am going to take it to the local Target and hand it out as I stroll the isle and enrich them. Thanks for the info Naya. Without it I might have gone to Millions of Milkshakes in West Hollywood and funneled money to in-tolerants who demand tolerance.

  • Cara

    Boycott or don’t – your choice. However – you may or may not factor the following into your decision.

    Stetement by Chick-fil-A’s CEO: “While my family and I believe in the Biblical definition of marriage, we love and respect anyone who disagrees. Chick-fil-A has a long history of trying to encourage and strengthen marriages and families, both within our Chick-fil-A system and with our customers. My father and our Founder/CEO, Truett Cathy, is a role model for the Cathy family and all those who have joined Chick-fil-A. His personal and business values have always reflected a belief in the importance of marriage and family.

    Chick-fil-A’s Corporate Purpose is ‘To glorify God by being a faithful steward of all that is entrusted to us, and to have a positive influence on all who come in contact with Chick-fil-A.’ As a result, we will not champion any political agendas on marriage and family. This decision has been made, and we understand the importance of it. At the same time, we will continue to offer resources to strengthen marriages and families. To do anything different would be inconsistent with our purpose and belief in Biblical principles.”

    If I owned a business and I operated it under Hellenic values, some people may not like that. They may decide to not purchase my products. But as long as I didn’t directly fund political campaigns or initiatives – I don’t see how it is anyone’s business. If I were to sponsor a seminar that was only for women, or only for Hellenics, or only for whatever group you could name – you could decide I was a bastard for doing so.

    Up to you all. This doesn’t affect me as we don’t have this chain here, but I don’t see them as doing anything horrid. It isn’t like this couples retreat is something that affects my life. It’s a private event to help Christian straight couples live like Christian straight couples. They have a right to their beliefs. I’m not going to bitch if they use profits from their company to donate to churches, either.

    (Also – many chick-fil-A’s are known as Chicks-get-laid in the lesbian community for many local Chick-fil-A’s hiring so many lesbians. Many gays and lesbians are speaking in support of Chick-fil-A as a great and open employer and note that individual stores are individually owned. A boycott of all Chick-fil-A’s may hurt owners who are either LGBT or very LGBT friendly.)

  • Cara

    Boycott or don’t – your choice. However – you may or may not factor the following into your decision.

    Stetement by Chick-fil-A’s CEO: “While my family and I believe in the Biblical definition of marriage, we love and respect anyone who disagrees. Chick-fil-A has a long history of trying to encourage and strengthen marriages and families, both within our Chick-fil-A system and with our customers. My father and our Founder/CEO, Truett Cathy, is a role model for the Cathy family and all those who have joined Chick-fil-A. His personal and business values have always reflected a belief in the importance of marriage and family.

    Chick-fil-A’s Corporate Purpose is ‘To glorify God by being a faithful steward of all that is entrusted to us, and to have a positive influence on all who come in contact with Chick-fil-A.’ As a result, we will not champion any political agendas on marriage and family. This decision has been made, and we understand the importance of it. At the same time, we will continue to offer resources to strengthen marriages and families. To do anything different would be inconsistent with our purpose and belief in Biblical principles.”

    If I owned a business and I operated it under Hellenic values, some people may not like that. They may decide to not purchase my products. But as long as I didn’t directly fund political campaigns or initiatives – I don’t see how it is anyone’s business. If I were to sponsor a seminar that was only for women, or only for Hellenics, or only for whatever group you could name – you could decide I was a bastard for doing so.

    Up to you all. This doesn’t affect me as we don’t have this chain here, but I don’t see them as doing anything horrid. It isn’t like this couples retreat is something that affects my life. It’s a private event to help Christian straight couples live like Christian straight couples. They have a right to their beliefs. I’m not going to bitch if they use profits from their company to donate to churches, either.

    (Also – many chick-fil-A’s are known as Chicks-get-laid in the lesbian community for many local Chick-fil-A’s hiring so many lesbians. Many gays and lesbians are speaking in support of Chick-fil-A as a great and open employer and note that individual stores are individually owned. A boycott of all Chick-fil-A’s may hurt owners who are either LGBT or very LGBT friendly.)

  • Andy1138

    It’s a tough call. I am in no way against gay rights, but once you start telling businesses that they can’t have opinions, you can paint yourself into the corner. I work in the veterinary industry, and have spent a lot of time in elder care, as well. Unfortunately, both industries swing heavily to the right. I am a lifetime Dem, but I just do what I’m doing and do it. People often mistake me for a lesbian. So sorry ladies, but I’m not, although I don’t bother correcting people who do think it, I just figure that it’s not their business. I don’t speak a lot about my Husband at work, or at school, just because I’m there to work, or learn. A sandwich is just a sandwich. I eat at many Republican establishments, even though I know that they are anti Gay, anti abortion, etc, and I even continue to associate with some members of PETA, even though I know that their anti pet initiative is stupid. My pets would not leave, if I kicked them out. :) In the end, votes are what make laws. People can have rallies and try to influence people to vote, but in the end, it’s hard to change the mind of anyone, when they feel strongly about their beliefs. I don’t think sandwich money can turn the tides. People vote for their beliefs, in private, in the booth. I think it’s fine to eat your sandwiches. It was Gertrude Stein that said, “Sometimes a rose is just a rose”. I do agree with Laura that, if you wish to avoid environmental damage, avoid the fountain drinks, because of the styrafoam.
    Although when I leave the city and visit my cuz out in Coldwater Michigan, I know that the stores are just run by hillbilly families. They’re good country folk that know not what they do. I just want to enjoy a cold drink in the eighty degree heat. They just need my cash to live. I just do my votes for the environment, in the booth.

  • Andy1138

    It’s a tough call. I am in no way against gay rights, but once you start telling businesses that they can’t have opinions, you can paint yourself into the corner. I work in the veterinary industry, and have spent a lot of time in elder care, as well. Unfortunately, both industries swing heavily to the right. I am a lifetime Dem, but I just do what I’m doing and do it. People often mistake me for a lesbian. So sorry ladies, but I’m not, although I don’t bother correcting people who do think it, I just figure that it’s not their business. I don’t speak a lot about my Husband at work, or at school, just because I’m there to work, or learn. A sandwich is just a sandwich. I eat at many Republican establishments, even though I know that they are anti Gay, anti abortion, etc, and I even continue to associate with some members of PETA, even though I know that their anti pet initiative is stupid. My pets would not leave, if I kicked them out. :) In the end, votes are what make laws. People can have rallies and try to influence people to vote, but in the end, it’s hard to change the mind of anyone, when they feel strongly about their beliefs. I don’t think sandwich money can turn the tides. People vote for their beliefs, in private, in the booth. I think it’s fine to eat your sandwiches. It was Gertrude Stein that said, “Sometimes a rose is just a rose”. I do agree with Laura that, if you wish to avoid environmental damage, avoid the fountain drinks, because of the styrafoam.
    Although when I leave the city and visit my cuz out in Coldwater Michigan, I know that the stores are just run by hillbilly families. They’re good country folk that know not what they do. I just want to enjoy a cold drink in the eighty degree heat. They just need my cash to live. I just do my votes for the environment, in the booth.


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