When Good Pagans Do Nothing

“All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.” - Leo Tolstoy

My Southern Baptist upbringing taught me that I was in the world but not of it. I was not to be concerned with worldly things, or to seek to engage with the world on it’s terms. I was to let that pass by and concern myself with the kingdom of God. My parents and some of my teachers at church had that old-school pre-politicized Evangelical worldview. There was a feeling that this world is run by Satan and thus only so much good can ever come of worldly things. My focus should be on God and my church family, because that is lasting and that is where true goodness lay.

Obviously, as I write to you from the Pantheon blog on the Pagan portal at Patheos.com, I no longer espouse that view. After years of being told I must disconnect with the world and with worldly things it was so refreshing, freeing and deeply satisfying to embrace Paganism. For Pagans, this world is sacred. It is both our present home and our home to come. To engage with this world is a very Pagan thing. The civic is sacred. The culture is sacred. I remember reading something once to the effect that it is the duty of Pagans to re-enchant and re-sacralize our world. I remember thinking what a wonderful and astounding thing to consider worldly things holy and to interact with them with that sort of mindfulness, without imposing our beliefs on them.

I’ve said before that I don’t think it’s appropriate to be a “political Pagan”. I leave my religion behind at the polls. I would not vote for a politician just because they are a “good Pagan” the way some people vote for candidates because they seem to be a “good Christian”. I hope there are more Pagan elected officials in the future, but I hope they are judged by their political record. I think that Dan Halloran is an incredible ice breaker. I hail his achievement. I am proud of his serving in political office as an “out” Pagan. That said, if he ran in my district I couldn’t say I’d vote for him. I leave my religion behind at the polls. That is a time for civic matters and in my opinion, civic matters are also sacred in their own right. But I digress.

So coming from old-school Evangelicalism to Paganism, imagine my surprise to find the same admonitions to disconnect from the world in the Pagan community. For every issue that comes up that affects, every news item that is of interest to our community and every instance of pop culture that portrays us, there is a minority of Pagans who consistently insist that it is not our place to speak on these matters. Don’t make a statement they say or claim this worldly thing as something that affects Pagans. It boggles my brain.

Where does this come from? This strain of thought echoing my mother’s and grandmother’s admonitions from the days before they thought it was acceptable to wear pants to church? Part of it comes from Wicca I think. The idea of being “Her Hidden Children” who worship under the dark cover of night, the Old Laws and the legends of the deep secrecy of Witches of yore all give some of us the impression that we are to be separate from the world. While for very basic safety reasons that was once true, today we seem to have our religious identity confused with our worship space. The Circle is a place that is no place and the time that is no time. The Circle is that separate realm where we engage with the elements, the Mighty Dead and the Gods. We are not the Circle. We are the lynch pin that brings and keeps the Circle in connection with this palpable earth for brief moments of time.

Yet some people act as if they are that sacred space. That they must remain separate and unsullied by anything base. They forget that they hop on the same commuter trains and get sick on the same week-old Chinese food that still smelled ok as the rest of us. Humans are base. Paradoxically, that’s what makes us amazing. We are lynch pins, we are bridges and we are the dynamic connection between the seen and unseen. With one hand we grasp the earth, the decomposing leaves, mud and rank weeds and with the other hand we reach out and grasp the stars. We are walking talking sacks of meat and water that flew through space and walked upon the moon.

We who have boogers and diarrhea and pimples and spider veins are not demeaned by engaging with the news, or pop culture or politics. I don’t think anyone should come out of the broom closet until they are ready to and I have no beef with mystery cults or Pagan monastics, but there is no virtue in disconnecting from the world. It flies in the face of the very basic underlying principles of almost every Pagan religion.

Another factor behind this disconnection is that I think people are afraid of looking silly. We don’t trust our fellow Pagans. We imagine that responding to issues that affect us will result in some blinged-out bohemian with an overwrought pseudonym wringing their hands and spouting ignorance on public tv. It’s happened before and it’s what the media look for when they want the “Pagan POV”. However this completely overlooks the incredibly smart, reasonable and articulate Pagans who are speaking out and representing us well. The Wild Hunt, The Witches’ VoiceGus DiZerega, Circle Sanctuary, Covenant of  the Goddess, the Pagan Newswire Collective and many others not only provide reasoned and timely Pagan perspectives, they do so in a way that is polished and admirable. I get a chuckle that after Jason at The Wild Hunt, Wren or Peg at The Witches Voice or Selena at Circle Sanctuary raise awareness of a news story or issue that people automatically begin debating whether we should respond or interact with the issue. People who were not aware of a story until Jason covered it begin to debate about whether he should cover it. It’s absurd.

Pagan media is undergoing exciting changes right now. While the “old guard” of Pagan news is embracing new media (like Circle Sanctuary and The Witches’ Voice) new Pagan media outlets are springing up and they’re good. Some of the Pagan Newswire Collective Bureaus are fantastic with dedicated, smart and articulate volunteer staff that I’d match against many newspapers any day. Almost every religion editor at every major mainstream news outlet has a Pagan media resource that is outstanding. The Washington Post has both Jason Pitzl-Waters and Starhawk, NPR has Margot Adler, several news outfits rely on Selena Fox for the Pagan perspective and large religion sites have dedicated Pagan writers (Gus DiZerega at Beliefnet and myself and a group of dedicated contributors here at Patheos).

The idea that Pagans shouldn’t speak out because we’ll embarrass ourselves is ridiculous when you look at the caliber of Pagans commenting on current events. These writers have moved past that idea and have now put reasoned Pagan perspectives in the hands of the mainstream media. They are proactive and broadening our horizons in a way that brings our whole community honor and respect. I’m quite proud to be a minor part of this Pagan media movement and following in the considerable footsteps of these Pagan trailblazers.

The last factor I think is straight-up paranoia. If it’s the squeaky wheel that gets the grease then it’s surely the tallest blade of grass that gets chopped down first. There are groups that are anti-Pagan, who would like nothing better than to revive the “Satanic Panic” of the 80′s and 90′s. They’d like to run us out of town on a rail, banish us from the public forums and remove any sign of government recognition from us. Rather than confronting this directly and openly, some Pagans think the best way to deal with this is to play into the stereotype. Remain hidden and secretive, without interacting with local clergy or government. If some issue affects a member of the wider Pagan community they are effectively happy to feed that person to the dogs by focusing on what makes that person different from themselves and being concerned with their own safety. There is a small minority who uses the disconnection rhetoric to cover up what I believe is no more or less than a moral defect.

Every Pagan I know who engages in those liminal places in our culture inspires me. Those who engage in interfaith work tell me it is the most challenging and satisfying service they can provide. Those who reach out and actively educate people about our faiths find people genuinely full of curious goodwill. Those who provide Pagan commentary and respond to issues that affect us are making strides I’d never have imagined for our communities. Those who endure the long slog of court battles to ensure our basic rights as Americans are my heros.

Engaging the world is a sacred and holy thing. It is a great responsibility. So many of the Pagans today who have become voices for our communities have done so not because they felt they were the most talented, beautiful or “awesomest” of us all, but because no one else would take a stand. I thank the Gods that Jason Pitzl-Waters never thought “I have no right to speak for the Pagan community” and decided to write a blog on darkwave music instead! Like so many Pagans, he saw a void in our community and in seeing this void he felt a responsibility to fill it the best way he could. The result of this is The Wild Hunt and the Pagan Newswire Collective. I’m sure Fritz and Wren had similar reasons for launching The Witches’ Voice (aka Witchvox) so many years ago. I know there are days when I feel strongly that someone needs to be writing about X, and find that I’m the only person interested in the subject. So I write, whether or not I feel I am qualified, because there is a void to fill.

Being a “Pagan pundit” or activist or interfaith educator is not a vainglorious thing. It places you in a position to catch a lot of criticism and a lot of negativity. Some days it can be pretty rough. It’s a burden and a responsibility, but the rewards are great. Seeing reasoned Pagan perspectives in The Washington Post, USA Today, and other mainstream news outlets is honestly something I never thought I would see in my lifetime, and I’m still a “young’un”.

Really this long-winded post is just a very long way to say how much I respect and admire the Pagans who engage with the world as it is and help create the world that could be. Their simple daily persistence, quiet courage and strong feeling of service and duty to the wider Pagan community has effects that will ripple through the world in positive ways for years.

I hail and give my gratitude and respect to the Pagans who didn’t believe that attacks on Satanists, Asatru and Santeria practitioners have nothing to do with us. I hail and give my gratitude and respect to those who didn’t think it was too silly to say that Nicholas Cage makes really horrible movies that reflect poorly on Pagan culture. I hail and give my gratitude and respect to the Pagans who didn’t say that military Pagans, gay Pagans and incarcerated Pagans aren’t any of our concern. I hail and give my gratitude and respect to all the Pagans who didn’t decide that working side-by-side with Christians, Muslims and Jews was a futile effort. I hail and give my gratitude and respect to all the Pagans who refused to be frightened into silence and now have become role models for the next generation of Pagans. I hail and give my gratitude and respect to those Pagans who spend hours every day in the holy pursuit of engaging with and fully inhabiting the world as a Pagan person, because they are making the world a better place.

I am grateful that these Pagans feel that in issues large and small it is inexcusable to do nothing. We are the bridge between the sacred and profane, and our engagement of the world is a holy act.

About Star Foster

Polytheistic Wiccan initiated into the Ravenwood tradition, she has many opinions. Some of them are actually useful.

  • http://www.patheos.com/ Star Foster

    I didn’t mention podcasters specifically in this post but Pagan Centered Podcast, Lamyka’s Wiccan Podcast, Druidcast, The Wigglian Way and many, many others also deserve our respect and gratitude. What they do is astounding, both from a serious angle and a humorous one.

    Pagan Centered Podcast may be the closest thing the Pagan community has to The Daily Show.

  • http://www.patheos.com Star Foster

    I didn’t mention podcasters specifically in this post but Pagan Centered Podcast, Lamyka’s Wiccan Podcast, Druidcast, The Wigglian Way and many, many others also deserve our respect and gratitude. What they do is astounding, both from a serious angle and a humorous one.

    Pagan Centered Podcast may be the closest thing the Pagan community has to The Daily Show.

  • FernWise

    I/we am/are the hands of the God/dess/es on this plane.

    They manifest things thru’ MY/OUR actions. That, to me, is part of the neopagan ‘theme’ of personal responsibility.

    • http://www.patheos.com/ Star Foster

      I agree. There’s a Christian song that goes “If we are the body then why aren’t his arms reaching? why aren’t his hands healing?”

      I’ve always thought that song makes a pretty darn good point: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAWeHo8E70E

  • FernWise

    I/we am/are the hands of the God/dess/es on this plane.

    They manifest things thru’ MY/OUR actions. That, to me, is part of the neopagan ‘theme’ of personal responsibility.

    • http://www.patheos.com Star Foster

      I agree. There’s a Christian song that goes “If we are the body then why aren’t his arms reaching? why aren’t his hands healing?”

      I’ve always thought that song makes a pretty darn good point: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAWeHo8E70E

  • Morningdove3202

    When I think about not being “of the world”, I don’t mean the world, I mean materialistic society that all about “keeping up with the Jones”. I would also like to give my gratitude for Pagans, like Lora Gaddis, who promotes a family friendly Pagan community that welcomes children and parents. If I ever accomplish anything for this community, it will be to advocate for the inclusion pagan parents and their kids in appropriate ways.

  • Morningdove3202

    When I think about not being “of the world”, I don’t mean the world, I mean materialistic society that all about “keeping up with the Jones”. I would also like to give my gratitude for Pagans, like Lora Gaddis, who promotes a family friendly Pagan community that welcomes children and parents. If I ever accomplish anything for this community, it will be to advocate for the inclusion pagan parents and their kids in appropriate ways.

  • Secondsight

    This is a reply I posted on the witches voice posting of this article.

    Okay, so this article raises some good points. It is indeed excellent that Pagan individuals and/or covens can reach out to the world and offer their opinions (and be heard), but some times, we tend to forget that we have different voices.

    This is a collection of faiths and sometimes we can treat Paganism as a political group in of itself. Well, we’re not, we all think differently on different subjects. It’s when we’re all united on a subject that it becomes “Our Voice”.

    I am a member of the community but the community doesn’t necessarily speak for me. Which is why it annoys me greatly when an article spouts “Pagans everywhere are rising up to…”, it’s like a political message to get everyone riled up and ready to act. A for instance is likened with an article the other month about the beer label. I mean seriously, the channels for complaints are already there, but the harassment those people incurred was uncalled for… most people probably never even noticed before.

    It’s like the voice is creating it’s own voice. (And I mean no disrespect to The Witches Voice/Witchvox.)

    We have to know when it is and when it isn’t necessary to speak up about something that truly needs to be said. There’s war, famine, plague, oh it goes on and on and that’s truly what’s important.

    • http://www.patheos.com/ Star Foster

      You’re right, we are a diverse set of communities but that doesn’t mean there isn’t an overarching sense of Pagan community.

      Catholic writers can’t express the views of all Catholics. Shoot, the Pope doesn’t even express the views of all Catholics. It’s the same with Pagan writers. We try to be inclusive and diverse, but we also have to be authentic to our own views. It’s a struggle sometimes to straddle that but there are folks like Jason who do it very well. I recently reviewed “American Mystic” and found myself wincing because Morpheus Ravenna wasn’t expressing inclusive, diverse pan-Pagan values, but speaking authentically from her own heart. I had to make myself let go of that need for her to “be all” and appreciate her openness and authenticity to her vision.

      Sure, the beer label thing was silly. But if we said “oh that’s silly I won’t respond to that” then only those who were huffing and puffing would be heard. It’s part of the give and take of the media in any religious community. The answer isn’t less dialogue, it’s more. Pagan media should be diverse and wide-ranging, and we should support those media outlets who respect the diversity of our communities as well as those who express themselves in a heartfelt and authentic way.

      • Secondsight

        Well written reply, will think upon it. :)

  • Secondsight

    This is a reply I posted on the witches voice posting of this article.

    Okay, so this article raises some good points. It is indeed excellent that Pagan individuals and/or covens can reach out to the world and offer their opinions (and be heard), but some times, we tend to forget that we have different voices.

    This is a collection of faiths and sometimes we can treat Paganism as a political group in of itself. Well, we’re not, we all think differently on different subjects. It’s when we’re all united on a subject that it becomes “Our Voice”.

    I am a member of the community but the community doesn’t necessarily speak for me. Which is why it annoys me greatly when an article spouts “Pagans everywhere are rising up to…”, it’s like a political message to get everyone riled up and ready to act. A for instance is likened with an article the other month about the beer label. I mean seriously, the channels for complaints are already there, but the harassment those people incurred was uncalled for… most people probably never even noticed before.

    It’s like the voice is creating it’s own voice. (And I mean no disrespect to The Witches Voice/Witchvox.)

    We have to know when it is and when it isn’t necessary to speak up about something that truly needs to be said. There’s war, famine, plague, oh it goes on and on and that’s truly what’s important.

    • http://www.patheos.com Star Foster

      You’re right, we are a diverse set of communities but that doesn’t mean there isn’t an overarching sense of Pagan community.

      Catholic writers can’t express the views of all Catholics. Shoot, the Pope doesn’t even express the views of all Catholics. It’s the same with Pagan writers. We try to be inclusive and diverse, but we also have to be authentic to our own views. It’s a struggle sometimes to straddle that but there are folks like Jason who do it very well. I recently reviewed “American Mystic” and found myself wincing because Morpheus Ravenna wasn’t expressing inclusive, diverse pan-Pagan values, but speaking authentically from her own heart. I had to make myself let go of that need for her to “be all” and appreciate her openness and authenticity to her vision.

      Sure, the beer label thing was silly. But if we said “oh that’s silly I won’t respond to that” then only those who were huffing and puffing would be heard. It’s part of the give and take of the media in any religious community. The answer isn’t less dialogue, it’s more. Pagan media should be diverse and wide-ranging, and we should support those media outlets who respect the diversity of our communities as well as those who express themselves in a heartfelt and authentic way.

      • Secondsight

        Well written reply, will think upon it. :)

  • Info

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  • Yundah

    I agree with you wholeheartedly. As a Wiccan whose first influence was Starhawk, it is impossible for me to be quiet. I’m out, I’m an educator and I teach a class on Earth Based Religions (which seems to be very popular. Not so much me as the topic I’m glad to say.)
    My experience is that many folks don’t act or speak on topics , or at least don’t publicly relate those topics to their pagan beliefs, because of fear of repercussions. Most of those I know embrace the world and life with gusto and love, the way most pagans ought to, but they hide the religious/spiritual part of it, keeping from the world in that manner, out of fear. I live in an area of the U.S. that is very Christian, all manners of Christianity are practiced but the tendency is towards conservatism if not fundamentalism. I have discovered that some of my friends and colleagues who are clergy or members of traditionally liberal churches have issues with my bringing the concept of paganism into a discussion, even though they may have been discussing the Christian perspective.
    I won’t lose my job over my religion but I know that if I worked at a more conservative institution, I might. It took me quite a long time here to come out of the broom closet. I think that it will be those of us who are “safe” who can educate others, be the talking heads, pundits, etc. until non-traditional religions, especially those viewed as pagan or heathen, are seen as “okay” by the majority, or even a majority of the majority.
    I want to thank you for providing good food for thought.
    Merry Met

  • Yundah

    I agree with you wholeheartedly. As a Wiccan whose first influence was Starhawk, it is impossible for me to be quiet. I’m out, I’m an educator and I teach a class on Earth Based Religions (which seems to be very popular. Not so much me as the topic I’m glad to say.)
    My experience is that many folks don’t act or speak on topics , or at least don’t publicly relate those topics to their pagan beliefs, because of fear of repercussions. Most of those I know embrace the world and life with gusto and love, the way most pagans ought to, but they hide the religious/spiritual part of it, keeping from the world in that manner, out of fear. I live in an area of the U.S. that is very Christian, all manners of Christianity are practiced but the tendency is towards conservatism if not fundamentalism. I have discovered that some of my friends and colleagues who are clergy or members of traditionally liberal churches have issues with my bringing the concept of paganism into a discussion, even though they may have been discussing the Christian perspective.
    I won’t lose my job over my religion but I know that if I worked at a more conservative institution, I might. It took me quite a long time here to come out of the broom closet. I think that it will be those of us who are “safe” who can educate others, be the talking heads, pundits, etc. until non-traditional religions, especially those viewed as pagan or heathen, are seen as “okay” by the majority, or even a majority of the majority.
    I want to thank you for providing good food for thought.
    Merry Met

  • An Independent Asatru

    When a beautiful little nine year old girl is shot to death everyone needs to speak out in outrage and grief. Religion becomes secondary.

  • An Independent Asatru

    When a beautiful little nine year old girl is shot to death everyone needs to speak out in outrage and grief. Religion becomes secondary.

  • Illiezeulette

    I agree. I think that staying up-to-date on international news, politics, etc. is a sacred act, and so is indulging in the fruits of artistic inspiration (even….American Idol? Maybe). I’ve equated Paganism and “liking material things” in my mind, and the rejection of this world is the rejection of fundamental and inextricable parts of our traditions.

  • Illiezeulette

    I agree. I think that staying up-to-date on international news, politics, etc. is a sacred act, and so is indulging in the fruits of artistic inspiration (even….American Idol? Maybe). I’ve equated Paganism and “liking material things” in my mind, and the rejection of this world is the rejection of fundamental and inextricable parts of our traditions.

  • Phoebe

    I like the concept of ‘catching’ criticism and negativity. It puts me in mind of a net that is there to protect others who may be more vulnerable, and deflect attacks that are unreasonable, meeting them with an attitude that may lessen the number of such attacks.

    I definitely am happy with the encouragement this article gives me to be more open. I have been a coward in many ways, and will probably continue to be, but it’s something to work on.

  • Phoebe

    I like the concept of ‘catching’ criticism and negativity. It puts me in mind of a net that is there to protect others who may be more vulnerable, and deflect attacks that are unreasonable, meeting them with an attitude that may lessen the number of such attacks.

    I definitely am happy with the encouragement this article gives me to be more open. I have been a coward in many ways, and will probably continue to be, but it’s something to work on.

  • http://www.confessionsofapagansoccermom.com/ Mrs.B.

    Very well said! I agree completely! We need to be active, to take our place in the world and be a part of it. We need to be aware of what’s going on with the Pagan community and our personal communities as well.

    I’d also like to add that I believe we should be concerned with news (and often the attacks) on non-Pagan witches. As long as people are persecuted in the name of witchcraft, no matter where they are in the world, no one who claims the title “witch” is safe.

  • http://www.confessionsofapagansoccermom.com/ Mrs.B.

    Very well said! I agree completely! We need to be active, to take our place in the world and be a part of it. We need to be aware of what’s going on with the Pagan community and our personal communities as well.

    I’d also like to add that I believe we should be concerned with news (and often the attacks) on non-Pagan witches. As long as people are persecuted in the name of witchcraft, no matter where they are in the world, no one who claims the title “witch” is safe.

  • http://twitter.com/APippinger Angela Pippinger

    I think it’s important too to be thankful for the many pagan blogs (small and large) that are all over the internet. Because of these blogs people can dive into who pagans really are instead of relying on old stereotypes. It doesn’t even matter if the blog is talking about politics or headline news, it’s still a push in the direction of interfaith in a different sort of method. I hope more and more pagans find that voice and use it!

  • http://twitter.com/PaganMomBlog Angela Pippinger

    I think it’s important too to be thankful for the many pagan blogs (small and large) that are all over the internet. Because of these blogs people can dive into who pagans really are instead of relying on old stereotypes. It doesn’t even matter if the blog is talking about politics or headline news, it’s still a push in the direction of interfaith in a different sort of method. I hope more and more pagans find that voice and use it!

  • Nemea

    Please change the attribution of the quotation at the beginning. This was said by Edmund Burke, not Tolstoy! I want folks to read it, because I think it is an important thing for people to think about and discuss, but the mis-attributed quote is the only thing that shows when it is shared on Facebook. Embarrassing! http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Edmund_Burke

  • Nemea

    Please change the attribution of the quotation at the beginning. This was said by Edmund Burke, not Tolstoy! I want folks to read it, because I think it is an important thing for people to think about and discuss, but the mis-attributed quote is the only thing that shows when it is shared on Facebook. Embarrassing! http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Edmund_Burke

  • Kerry W.

    Thanks for writing this — it’s brilliant. Strife within my own witchcraft community and an ongoing discussion with a very spiritual nature-lover who stands by his atheism have me reflecting on Earth: what it means to be silent, how it works, when silence is and is not appropriate, what we need to grow, what it means to be corporeal, what our relation with the planet and all its faces should be. This piece is so well-written and so well-thought-out.

  • Kerry W.

    Thanks for writing this — it’s brilliant. Strife within my own witchcraft community and an ongoing discussion with a very spiritual nature-lover who stands by his atheism have me reflecting on Earth: what it means to be silent, how it works, when silence is and is not appropriate, what we need to grow, what it means to be corporeal, what our relation with the planet and all its faces should be. This piece is so well-written and so well-thought-out.

  • Beth W.

    This is a good piece. Thanks for writing it. Although I am not a practicing pagan, I feel STRONGLY that pagans of all stripes need to speak out and be visible, if for no other reason than to counteract the idea that pagans are questionable, imbalanced, or even violent people. Whenever there’s a crime and “the occult” is bandied about, either as a motive or as part of the criminal’s lifestyle, it creates the impression that pagans/occultists are lawbreakers. This is something I’ve written about a couple of times.

    Loughner’s “twisted shrine” probably isn’t: http://backwardmessages.wordpress.com/2011/01/11/loughners-twisted-shrine-probably-isnt/

    Occult Profiling: Where it comes from and why it’s worth fighting http://plutonica.net/2010/03/24/occult-profiling-where-it-comes-from-and-why-its-worth-fighting/

  • Beth W.

    This is a good piece. Thanks for writing it. Although I am not a practicing pagan, I feel STRONGLY that pagans of all stripes need to speak out and be visible, if for no other reason than to counteract the idea that pagans are questionable, imbalanced, or even violent people. Whenever there’s a crime and “the occult” is bandied about, either as a motive or as part of the criminal’s lifestyle, it creates the impression that pagans/occultists are lawbreakers. This is something I’ve written about a couple of times.

    Loughner’s “twisted shrine” probably isn’t: http://backwardmessages.wordpress.com/2011/01/11/loughners-twisted-shrine-probably-isnt/

    Occult Profiling: Where it comes from and why it’s worth fighting http://plutonica.net/2010/03/24/occult-profiling-where-it-comes-from-and-why-its-worth-fighting/

  • Wes Isley

    Thanks, Star, for the encouragement. I think some people turn to paganism for an escape perhaps, thinking they can leave this world behind. Far from it! Paganism is more connected to this world than most (in my opinion) religions out there.

    But I do have to disagree on one point: I secretly enjoy all those bad Nicholas Cage movies!

  • Wes Isley

    Thanks, Star, for the encouragement. I think some people turn to paganism for an escape perhaps, thinking they can leave this world behind. Far from it! Paganism is more connected to this world than most (in my opinion) religions out there.

    But I do have to disagree on one point: I secretly enjoy all those bad Nicholas Cage movies!

  • Wachwurd

    HI Star,

    This is an excellent article.

    M

  • Wachwurd

    HI Star,

    This is an excellent article.

    M

  • Anonymous

    These blogs people can dive into this pagan really is instead of relying on old stereotypes. It is always a push toward inter-religious in a different kind of method.


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