Jesus and the Political

A blog reader asked me two questions in a recent comment: “Is Obama who you thought he was? and has America changed for the better(long term) since he was elected?” I thought about it a bit and started writing a response, but it was too long so I made it into this post. Here’s my response:

Q1: Obama seems to be about what I expected him to be.

Q2: I don’t think America has changed appreciably since he took office.

That’s probably not what you are looking for, but I feel no special allegiance to any of the American political parties or ideologies. I don’t generally watch Fox News or MSNBC, unless Jon Stewart is poking fun of them. I don’t buy the bashing and conspiracies from the right and I’m not an Obama sycophant.

Christianity is a politic, to be sure. But it is not Republican or Democrat, Conservative or Liberal in nature. Our agenda is mercy and justice, right relationships between the person and God, the self, other persons, and God’s good creation. We work with anyone who works for peace, no matter their race, religion, creed, or politics. I can’t even begin to explain how much I don’t care about the typical bashing that goes on from the right and left alike. Nothing good comes from that, it is not designed to inspire hope, but hatred, fear and negativity.

America seems to be struggling as a culture and a country. But it’s not simply the fault of politicians. I think politics largely reflects culture and our culture has chosen greed & affluence over mercy & justice. Even more than that, as a culture, we’ve lost the ideal of the “common good” as well as any concept of “enough.”

But it’s not only the fault of culture, it’s the fault of the church as well. As Christians, we’ve offered no alternative vision strong enough to counter the narrative of greed. We’ve largely gone along with the culture and baptized the values of individualism, consumerism and nationalism with religious language. In the end, we’re not appreciably different from anyone else in our culture, in many ways we’re just less tolerant, more self-concerned and more violent.

Followers of Jesus need to learn how to embody and proclaim a completely different vision of reality. The alternative vision is the kingdom of God and it is the central message of Christ, (see Matthew 5, 6 and 7, Mark 1, Luke 4). This narrative calls into question our entire way of life and it is actually powerful enough to inspire a completely different “way” of being human.

In this “way,” we find our life by losing it…losing ourselves on behalf of others. We do not exploit weaknesses in our opponents, we become purposefully weak ourselves so that the power of God can inhabit our weakness. We practice kenotic self-emptying and humbling. And we believe that this way of being human is what Jesus has inaugurated and empowered through his life, death and resurrection. It has very little resemblance to either side of the American political landscape and must not be so joined to either one that it becomes impossible to embody something so radically different as the kingdom of God.

About Tim Suttle

Find out more about Tim at TimSuttle.com

Tim Suttle is the senior pastor of RedemptionChurchkc.com. He is the author of several books including his most recent - Shrink: Faithful Ministry in a Church Growth Culture (Zondervan 2014), Public Jesus (The House Studio, 2012), & An Evangelical Social Gospel? (Cascade, 2011). Tim's work has been featured at The Huffington Post, The Washington Post, Sojourners, and other magazines and journals.

Tim is also the founder and front-man of the popular Christian band Satellite Soul, with whom he toured for nearly a decade. The band's most recent album is "Straight Back to Kansas." He helped to plant three thriving churches over the past 13 years and is the Senior Pastor of Redemption Church in Olathe, Kan. Tim's blog, Paperback Theology, is hosted at Patheos.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16362575507895945799 David Young

    Superbly stated.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02289110643212600386 Scott Stone

    Hey Tim,

    I'm fascinated with this post of yours so I have a few questions, When do you think the culture changed in America and why? Why do you think the church isn't able to offer a better vision? And final, do you think Americans are even able to grasp the redeeming message of Christ. I don't disagree with you that as a nation we are struggling but it has to be more than just greed. We as a nation have spent $1 trillion dollars on the war poverty and rates haven't changed. Yet we have the ability to feed the whole world but choose to feed only a portion of it.

    My view is that the rights attempt to inject religion into their platform coupled with the lefts belief in moral relativism have had incredible damage on people, who for the most part don't have critical thinking skills. How do we in this climate even have a dialogue about the emptiness of life outside of Christ. And I think that is what people are experiencing,,,Emptiness. Trying to fill it with stuff.

    Just some thoughts.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10974397437648079481 Tim Suttle

    I think the American culture has always been this way to some extent. For all of the great stuff we did – liberty, freedom, equality, rule of law – we also eradicated millions of Native Americans and prospered on the backs of black slaves for two centuries, all in the name of progress and manifest destiny. Lately it has become more about affluence & unbridled consumerism.

    I think the church isn’t able to offer a different vision to live by because we don’t live by a different vision. The gospel is centered on the principle of kenosis – self-emptying, taking up our cross, taking the humble road…it’s the meek who will inherit the earth, the poor in spirit will see God. The American church doesn’t offer anything different than the American culture’s quest for power and control. We have lost the center of the gospel, which is that in our powerlessness, Christ’s power is perfected – we descend into greatness. Often times we just offer a way to feel superior to other people, kind of a Gnosticism that says “we have the truth and you don’t, you need to listen to us.”

    For the culture at large, I don’t think it’s a matter of grasping the message, at least not as a concept or abstraction that we must give mental assent to. It’s a matter of enjoining a way of being human that is “after Christ.” Eugene Peterson calls it the “God life.” Paul calls it the “mind of Christ” which we mistakenly take as merely a belief system. But the word in the Greek, phronein, means a wholistic, cruciform pattern of thinking feeling and acting that is peculiar to the people of God. If Americans cannot grasp it, it is not their fault, it is our fault for not embodying to such an extent that we literally become salt and light everywhere we go. Right now they have no alternative narrative being modeled for them.

    I think individualism, consumerism and nationalism are not Christian values. Yet the Christian church embraces those things and doesn’t stand apart from them embodying our essential connectedness: instead of individualism, we could practice humbling and emptying ourselves on behalf of the poor and marginalized; instead of acquiring more and more stuff & giving ourselves over to a consumer culture we could practice a simpler way of life – a life with plenty of margins in our time, our money, etc.; instead of pledging allegiance to the country in which we live, we could give ourselves fully and only to God, his people and his way of living.

    I think you are right about the political left’s relativism. There are just as many pitfalls on the American political left as the right. Christians cannot simply become liberals. The left often plays the exact same power games the right plays. They just use tools like political correctness as a way to gain dominance and control. The left is every bit as sold out to individualism, consumerism and nationalism as the right. They also, as you point out, seem to espouse a kind of tolerance that seems more like a refusal to stand up for anything. That type of tolerance is meaningless. The left is often smug and cynical about religion – preferring politicians who have absolutely no inner life that end up operating only out of self-interest, power, and fear…especially the fear of not being re-elected.

    I do disagree on one thing. I don’t think emptiness is the problem – but I might be misunderstanding how you are using that. If you mean there is a void that only God can fill (like meaninglessness) I’m with you. But I think one of our big problems is there's no empty space for God to fill. We’ve crammed our lives full of so much stuff that they number one answer to “how are you doing?” has become “Busy!” We don't live with margins of time in which to encounter God and other people. We don't budget with margins from which to be generous. We don't trust God to keep us safe and happy, we trust government. We entertain ourselves to the hilt and have little space to commune with God. We need more emptiness in our lives…space and margin that God can inhabit.

    That’s what I think.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15065500839727028064 Nate

    In this "way," we find our life by losing it…losing ourselves on behalf of others. We do not exploit weaknesses in our opponents, we become purposefully weak ourselves so that the power of God can inhabit our weakness. We practice kenotic self-emptying and humbling. And we believe that this way of being human is what Jesus has inaugurated and empowered through his life, death and resurrection.

    Amen.

    This posture is the connection between achievement culture (read: American/Western/Capitalistic) and church culture that is so fascinating. It is in direct opposition to everything we hold dear.

    Why would anyone empty themselves in a professional situation where promotions and prestige are on the line? "I mean, this is about my family!"

    Speaking of politics – the very nature of politics smacks the face of the emptying ethos. It is about winning no matter the means. "We're doing it for the unborn, for the poor!"

    What about where we choose to live, thus the very definition of HOW we live? "Why would I live in THAT neighborhood? I can't send the kids to THAT school!"

    The ethos of the achieving class will provide us excuses until we are all dead and gone and the earth has spit us out. We keep running from God and God keeps chasing us down. That's really the amazing part. How does God love this world of selfish bastards?!?

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10111203088192233369 AaronTiffany

    Hey Tim, funny you blogged about this. I was wondering the same thing on your thoughts on Obama since the election and some of the decisions being made and things going on in our nation.
    I agree about the right and the left. It just seems to me that Obama is just as far left as anybody.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14577192429618221591 Loren

    Tim, As Aaron said above I was thinking about those who voted for Obama and/or supported him enough during the campaign to be vocal in favor of him. I cannot refute anything you said about our role as christians in the world and what our focus and actions should be. With that being said I wanted to ask these 2 questions to someone who vocally supported him through their blog. One of your answers was that "he seems to be about what I expected him to be."

    Just to be clear and upfront about some of his actions and views: Reckless spending via a "stimulus" plan that had only 10% of funds dedicated to job creation, Record and historic spending via the 2009 US budget, recently has proved himself to be an opportunistic divider not a unifier on race as he assured us during the campaign(as evidenced in his comments about the Cambridge, Mass. police dept and his former colleague), routinely targeting, maligning and lying about those who assert their right to speak out against his views or agenda( Joe the plumber, the Orlando Fl. news reporter and her husband, Rick Santelli and Jim Cramer of CNBC), Dedicating his early lifes work of community organizing to the teachings of a man who dedicated his most popular book to Lucifer( Rules for Radicals by Saul Alinsky), by the way have you read Rules for Radicals? It made me physically ill and my head spin. Our President followed, spoke and taught this book to others in his community. This book teaches people how to destroy your target/enemy at any cost and by any means. is he still who you thought he was?

    A man who allows reckless idealogy to cloud his decisions on tough situations like Gitmo(deciding it would be close in 1 year before any serious investigation of facts, facilities and options are looked into). A person who uses intimidation and fear with coworkers in Congress. Threating them when they dare speak out in opposition(Quote: "Don't think were not keeping score" and "you're going to ruin my presidency"). He encouraged congress not to read the stimulus but pass it anyway because there was a crisis, then after he got what he wanted, was slow to act with the funds that he claimed were need so badly. Made the man who said about the US economy "never let a good opportunity go to waste" his chief of staff. Has been as still on track to be the most liberal and radical president the US has ever seen. Went against the Honduras national constitution when the country threw out a dictator in the making. Continually passes the buck on the economy and blames others when he is the one who assured us that he knew what to do economically in this situation and asked for this job. Liying to the American public about the quality of medical care, coverage andthose who don't have medical care( the real number of those who don't have insurance is around 19 million not 47 million according the the 2006 census, 8% of the US population).

    You may think of me as a right wing nut job but these are the facts. Most of the above info was pulled from the Wall St. Journal newspaper. It is hard for me to believe that you can say that "he is about what you expected him to be". I'm not telling you that you are wrong or coming against you as a person or a christian. But to say he is who you thought he was and for the facts above to be true, is mind boggling. You decided to support him on your blog during the campaign and I now choose to question you and others on how much people understand of our president on the real issues that face our nation. To quickly answer my questions and then spend several paragraphs on a completely different subject is evasive. Once again, I cannot disagree on your assessments about how christians should interact in our world. But if you speak in support of a candidate you should at least be ready to explain your views on relavant issues and actions by that candidate.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10974397437648079481 Tim Suttle

    Loren,

    Joe the Plumber? Seriously? It's difficult to respond to a post with such an acerbic tenor. I'm reticent to dialogue with someone who is feeling feisty enough to channel Glen Beck, but I'll try to engage as gracefully as possible.

    I was not being evasive or diffident, sometimes the best answer to the question "Is this black or white," is "yes," or "sort of." I doubt there is anything I could say that would curtail your disapprobation. But I believe this tells me much more about you than it does about President Obama's job performance.

    I would encourage you to engender an attempt at an open mind. Stop watching Fox News and listening to Rush; read something challenging; take off your dualistic lenses and try to meet reality instead of judging it for a change. If your posture toward everything President Obama says or does is vitriolic opposition, I should think it no surprise that you will fulminate at every turn. But I do not believe this to be a helpful or hopeful posture and it's not one I am comfortable assuming. Plus it’s just a frustrating way to live your life! The wise person knows that there is a difference between being right and having made up your mind. Only if we remain open can we learn, change and grow. It seems to me your mind is already made up, you see what you want to see.

    I'm not going to go look up stats or dig up the accomplishments of the Obama Administration to try and counter your one-sided analysis and justify my support of the President. I will say that I feel no need to oppose him right now, but pray for his success and that he will use the power he has been given to support the cause of mercy and justice.

    I appreciate that the President has not started any new wars and seems to be showing patience and restraint with foreign policy issues with North Korea and Iran. News today says the draw down of troops in Iraq could go even faster, I think that is a good thing.

    I think it is laudable that he is engaging rising cost of health-care which virtually everyone agrees needs to be addressed, but hardly anyone has stuck their neck out and shown the will to lead. This one issue may be doing as much to torpedo our economy as anything else. I’m sure the president will pay a huge political price, but I'm happy with his willingness to compromise on the issue. He's been out there making his case and trying to sell his ideas to the American public. He's attempting to break a long standing and self-destructive stalemate. It's bound to be stilted and messy, but only good can come of that.

    The Massachusetts police did act stupidly. They should have left Professor Gates alone the moment they knew it was his house. He can do whatever he wants to his own front door.

    On the economic front, I think my original post engaged that issue and portrays my thinking.

    Bottom line – why be a hater? Why not be open to seeing the world in a different way? Let go of some of the conservative dogma and ideology and try to get past the liberal/conservative dualisms. The world looks so much more fraught with genuine possibility from here!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02289110643212600386 Scott Stone

    Tim,

    I'm always amazed how excited people get when we blend the topics of religion and politics together. I'm fortunate enough to spend time in Europe every year and can tell you that nowhere on that continent do people have such a visceral response.

    With that being said, people need to get back to some basic truths. Men will fail us. We can not put our hope in the ways of this world. Every time I have a Christian brother or sister go off on the President, the first thing I do is ask them when was the last time they prayed for him. God has put him in a place of authority and whether we agree or not it is our job to pray for him. I'm no fan of Barack Obama but I was no fan of GW. They are both men and because of that they are seriously flawed just like the rest of us.

    As someone who did my Grad work in Economics I have a plethora of reasons to disagree with this President. But that doesn't advance the discussion. I need to be working on justice and equality in my own community instead of getting all worked up on the macro issues.

    I'm only going to take issue with one thing you said and that's in regards to Professor Gates. As someone who has family in law enforcement, the Professor was out of line and the President admitted he didn't have all the facts yet felt compelled to choose sides. One of the most dangerous calls an officer has to respond to is walking up to a house and not knowing what is going on inside. They ask the person in the house to exit so they know no one is standing behind him with a weapon. Gates is an arrogant Ivy league Professor. No big surprise, it goes with the territory but, if you have ever heard him speak extemporaneously you would find that he has an issue with white people. Race is the dirty little topic we don't want to really have an honest discussion about and I think race was the overriding fact for the President when he made the comment he did.

    Since we are talking religion and politics lets keep the temperature up. Race sure will do that.

    Scott

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02289110643212600386 Scott Stone

    Tim,

    I'm always amazed how excited people get when we blend the topics of religion and politics together. I'm fortunate enough to spend time in Europe every year and can tell you that nowhere on that continent do people have such a visceral response.

    With that being said, people need to get back to some basic truths. Men will fail us. We can not put our hope in the ways of this world. Every time I have a Christian brother or sister go off on the President, the first thing I do is ask them when was the last time they prayed for him. God has put him in a place of authority and whether we agree or not it is our job to pray for him. I'm no fan of Barack Obama but I was no fan of GW. They are both men and because of that they are seriously flawed just like the rest of us.

    As someone who did my Grad work in Economics I have a plethora of reasons to disagree with this President. But that doesn't advance the discussion. I need to be working on justice and equality in my own community instead of getting all worked up on the macro issues.

    I'm only going to take issue with one thing you said and that's in regards to Professor Gates. As someone who has family in law enforcement, the Professor was out of line and the President admitted he didn't have all the facts yet felt compelled to choose sides. One of the most dangerous calls an officer has to respond to is walking up to a house and not knowing what is going on inside. They ask the person in the house to exit so they know no one is standing behind him with a weapon. Gates is an arrogant Ivy league Professor. No big surprise, it goes with the territory but, if you have ever heard him speak extemporaneously you would find that he has an issue with white people. Race is the dirty little topic we don't want to really have an honest discussion about and I think race was the overriding fact for the President when he made the comment he did.

    Since we are talking religion and politics lets keep the temperature up. Race sure will do that.

    Scott

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14577192429618221591 Loren

    Tim,

    Had I known that you would respond to my second post the way you did I would have never written it. The last thing I wanted this to be was a war of words between two Christians. That is not what I desire or wish to be a part of. My mindset was that of a counter-point to the U.S. mainstream media who is overwhelmingly positive on Obama. My "one-sided analysis" was meant to act as a counter balance or to shed light to a Obama supporter on issues and views that the mainstream media does not pursue.

    You may have misunderstood my post to be an attack on yourself or our President. My intent was neither. My desire was to dialogue with someone whom I know is like me in one area and unlike me in another. The number of examples I used in describing Obama was a mistake on my part. That is probably where I lost you. Had I limited my examples to a select few we may have had a better mutual understanding about each other and I may have been able to understand a Christians views on supporting Obama in a deeper way. Instead it devolved into personal judgement and insults.

    Jesus said the world "would know us by our love". Our communication at this point is fruitless and lacking brotherly love. Once again, my intent was not to attack you. I am sorry if you interpretted my comments in this way.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10974397437648079481 Tim Suttle

    I'm certainly not the first to point out the conflation of evangelical christianity and right wing politics. Much of what I'm saying in this thread is just an attempt to contravert what appears to me an unholy alliance. Christians must learn to see the whole ballgame through a different lens, a post-conservative post- liberal politics . I just don't feel any affinity for the God & country thing, nor do I feel any need to look for the bad in our cuurent presidential administration. I know it must appear radical, but the sermon on the mount is nothing like the typical conservative political agenda – thats what I think.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02289110643212600386 Scott Stone

    Tim,

    Nor is the sermon on the mount like
    any typical liberal agenda. I think
    that is the point. The term Christian
    conservative or Progressive Christian
    just doesn't work for me. I may be a
    bit more conservative than others on
    some issues and a bit more liberal
    on others but that has nothing to do
    with my pursuit of Jesus.

    Scott

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10974397437648079481 Tim Suttle

    Hey Scott, true…but I don't think the liberals are in danger of being over-run by evangelicals anytime soon…he he. I do think that our politics has everything to do with our pursuit of Jesus, though. Would you agree?.

    Also, are you still going to the Moltmann thing in Chicago? I'm hoping to catch up with you while I'm there:-)

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02289110643212600386 Scott Stone

    Tim,

    Yeah, no concern about that or the evangelicals being inundated with liberals either. I see your point. Still planning on attending the conversation so far. I'm hoping my schedule holds up.

    I've really been chewing on your statement about our politics having everything to do with our pursuit of Christ. I'm going to disagree with you only because I'd like a better explanation.

    I don't believe my pursuit of Christ and my political views are interrelated. Politics is the pursuit of power and the pursuit of Jesus is antithetical to that. Maybe some who have only a dualistic view of things, good vs. evil, right vs. left, may let their politics affect their walk but even then there are fundamentals we can all agree upon.

    I've got to think about it some more because my initial reaction was to agree with you. I'd hate to think I let my political views bastardize pursuit.

    Scott

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10974397437648079481 Tim Suttle

    Scott – It’s a fair question, but one which is now seems fairly well settled in current scholarship. I come down with a long list of scholars who think that a Christian faith which is privatized and focused largely on personal salvation of the soul is a dangerous kind of dualism. Not only is it a reduction of the gospel which Jesus came to preach – the Good News of the coming of the kingdom of God – but if Christianity is not political then although the church can have free reign over the soul, the body is essentially the property of the state. I think of the warden’s line from The Shawshank Redemption, “Give your heart to Jesus but your ass belongs to me.” This is really not the Christian story. Our bodies are the property of our maker and the way we organize them (politics) is very much an issue of faith.

    Hauerwas argues that evangelicalism is just the kind of civil religion the American democracy has come to depend upon. If the churches are busy saving individual souls then maybe they won’t speak out against the rampant materialism and violence of our culture. If Christians will keep in line, the state will afford us certain protections and freedoms. In our culture, the church will be determinant in the person's eternal plans but will have little to say about how we organize our common life. In essence our Soteriology becomes a substantiating rationale for the existence of a secular, liberal democracy and the church merely a supporting institution for a government that espouses individualism, materialism and violence.

    From the very start of our story, the Christian narrative addresses the way in which we organize our common life together as human beings. The first commands were to be fruitful and multiply, fill the earth and subdue it, till the earth and keep it and we were given dominion over the animals and nature. We are meant to rule and reign over the earth in a particular way. Christians have universally agreed that at least we were created in the image of God and commanded to be God’s icons – image bearing people – so that all the earth would be filled with people that image/icon God. To image/icon God means that when you see the way these people live their lives you see past the people themselves and see the God who is their creator and sustainer. The law, summed by the 10 commandments is a politic – organizing principles for the people of God – and the Sermon on the Mount was the Christological re-interpretation of those organizing principles. It is political because it is not talking to discreet individual person about how they can receive eternal life, but to a people – the people of God – about how they should organize their common lives together in such a way that they image God to all creation.

    What the folks I read, (like Hauerwas, Yoder, Cavanaugh, Moltmann, Jenson, Pannenberg, NT Wright and others) argue is that the church must play by different rules, organizing our common lives according to the teachings of Jesus. This happens not merely as discreet individuals, but as a people – thus it is inherently political. And, in so doing we will embody the politics of the kingdom of God, where people organize themselves in peace, not grasping but being humble and practicing a kenotic offering of the self to the other. In so doing, we will image God. I think this is highly political. The idea is that we will become the city on the hill, the lamp on a stand, we will be salt and light to the world. That’s the best way I can explain what I mean by our faith is political. It has everything to do with how we organize our common life and whether that images God or simply images culture.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13373007682572967645 Hayes

    Tim,

    I have enjoyed reading this dialogue. Thank you for your thoughts.

    There are camps that line up with many of your views, some take it as far as to believe that as Christians, they belong to a nation of Christ and not the nation of America or Canada or…. Some go as far as to not participate in national politics but only local. Some do not participate on any level, so they do not believe it is their role to even vote. What are your thought on this? As Christians, to what extent are we or not called to participate in politics? Is it our duty to vote? If only sometimes, are we to only vote when we see horrible atrocities?

    Thanks,
    Hayes

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10974397437648079481 Tim Suttle

    Hayes,

    That’s a good question. I’m not sure I’ve found a camp besides the church – those are my people. I don’t think we should drop out of society by any means. But I think it is Yoder in “The Politics of Jesus” who rightly reminds us that baptism into the church was considered a renunciation of citizenship in the Roman Empire for the first century convert. Not that I think we should renounce our own citizenship in whatever country we live – I don’t think that. I do think it is helpful to remember that no political allegiance should usurp our allegiance to the mission of God. I don’t think we should refuse to participate because I have a missional commitment. I’m a part of a faith that is political in that we believe we are called to be a part of God’s creation rightly ordered – imaging God wherever we go including the political arena. I think voting is good, getting involved and calling/emailing our representatives is good. I’m not so sure I would see it as, strictly speaking, a duty.

    One question your thoughts bring to mind is this: does the Christian have civic duties? It seems like we do, but maybe they are initially pointed toward obedience to God, then toward serving our fellow man (which often looks like civic duty). But I also think sometimes our duty to the kingdom overrides civic duties – even laws – as was the case with those who worked on the underground railroad during slavery or the non-violent protests during the civil rights movement which violated the law of the country, but respected the laws of God.

    This is a hard issue because none of it is that cut and dried. I do know this – it’s really good to talk about it and to try to not demonize each other. I’ve still got a long way to go to pull that off consistently (as you can tell by some of my short tempered responses in this post :-)

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  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17612227041383997608 T & T Livesay

    I am reading through your stuff, obviously going back to older posts. I agree with the first commenter, this is superbly stated. Struggle with this stuff a lot. We have been removed from the thick of things for a few years and it makes it seem much worse (more divisive and sad) to us being removed and watching it from afar.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17612227041383997608 T & T Livesay

    Great thoughts, agreeing that it was superbly stated.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10974397437648079481 Tim Suttle

    thanks – hold on to your hat because it's about to get crazy here with a presidential election on the horizon. God help us to not tear one another down.


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