How Does “Dying for our Sins” Work?

I read a great post from Brian Zahnd this week, it’s worth a read. Here’s a quick excerpt. You can find the whole article and Brian’s blog here:

When we say “Jesus died for our sins,” what does that mean? It’s undeniably an essential confession of Christian faith, but how does it work? This much I’m sure of, it’s not reducible to just one thing… To try to reduce the death of Jesus to a single meaning is an impoverished approach to the mystery of the cross. I’m especially talking about those tidy explanations of the cross known as “atonement theories.” I find most of them inadequate; others I find repellent. Particularly abhorrent are those theories that portray the Father of Jesus as a pagan deity who can only be placated by the barbarism of child sacrifice. The god who is mollified by throwing a virgin into a volcano or by nailing his son to a tree is not the Abba of Jesus!

Neither is the death of Jesus a kind of quid pro quo by which God gains the necessary capital to forgive sinners. No! Jesus does not save us from God; Jesus reveals God! Jesus does not provide God with the capacity to forgive; Jesus reveals God as forgiving love…

Let me suggest that when we say Jesus died for our sins, we mean something like this: We violently sinned our sins into Jesus, and Jesus revealed the heart of God by forgiving us. When Jesus prayed, “Father, forgive them,” he was not asking God to act contrary to his nature. When Jesus prayed, “Father, forgive them,” he was, as always, revealing the very heart of God!

At the cross we violently sinned our sins into Jesus, and Jesus absorbed them, died because of them, carried them into death, and rose on the third day to speak the first world of the new world: “Peace be with you.”

When I say “we” violently sinned our sins into Jesus, I mean that all of us are more or less implicated by our explicit or tacit support of the systems of violent power that frame our world. These are the very political and religious systems that executed Jesus. At the cross we see where Adam and Eve’s penchant for blame and Cain’s capacity for killing have led us — to the murder of God! At Golgotha human sin is seen as utterly sinful. God did not require the death of Jesus — but we did!

What I love about the way Brian is interacting with this theme, is that he is taking seriously our own complicity in Christ’s death. We are the ones that call for blood. God does not delight in the blood of bulls and goats. Jesus, dying on the cross, is God saying “enough with all the blood already.” I also love that Brian is connecting violence to the gospel. Where God reigns there is peace. Where God does not reign (where what God wants to happen isn’t happening), there is violence. You want to know where sin & death reigns? Follow the violence. You want to know where the gospel is? Follow the peace.

"Maybe with the same rage as Judas. I can tell though you aren’t a person ..."

Why Corruption Matters
"No God agrees with you, so I cannot and would never have to trust you ..."

Why Corruption Matters
"Pretty fascinating encounter. Can't say I've ever had quite that close a personal encounter, though ..."

Why Corruption Matters
"He said we have to carry His cross and share His burdens, which become lighter ..."

Why Corruption Matters

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


TRENDING AT PATHEOS Progressive Christian
What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment