Ten Great Words You Should Know and Use – Part 05

I am an unabashed logophile (n. – lover of words). The English language is a tough one to master even for those of us who have been using it our whole life. For some this is merely frustrating. For others her idiosyncrasies make English fascinating and multifarious (adj. – ‘to having many parts; diverse and varied’). And yet the typical [Read More...]

Ten Great Words You Should Know & Use – Part 04

10 Great Words You Should Know & Use part 1 & part 2 & part 3 have been big posts here at Paperback Theology. Here’s another list of ten to feed your inner logophile. sublimate - (v.) To divert the expression of an instinctual desire or impulse from its unacceptable form to one that is considered more socially or culturally acceptable. (Maybe you [Read More...]

What Our Words Tell Us: David Brooks on the Rise of the Individual

brooks

I love to talk about words. 10 Great Words You Should Know & Use part 1 & part 2 & part 3 have been big posts here at Paperback Theology. I love to talk about the words we use not as an expert, but as an observer and lover of culture.. That’s why I was [Read More...]

Can You Bunk Something… or Combobulate Me? 10 Great Words With Essential Prefixes

Can you bunk something? Can you combobulate me? (that sounds naughty:-)). I saw this list on Dictionary.com – where I am a frequent flyer (which also means I belong to a sub-culture known as “the socially awkward”). These are ten words which have essential prefixes. That means the root word without its prefix/suffix is no [Read More...]

Ten Great Words You Should Know and Use – Part 02

I am an unabashed logophile (n. – lover of words), and am always on the lookout for ways to improve my vocabulary. As I’ve begun writing more and more, I’ve noticed that I track in the same semantic (adj. – pertaining to meaning of words), pathways – a kind of syntactical (adj. – pertaining to the study [Read More...]

Ten Great Words You Should Know and Use

I am an unabashed logophile (n. – lover of words). The English language is a tough one to master even for those of us who have been using it our whole life. For some this is merely frustrating. For others her idiosyncrasies make English fascinating and multifarious (adj. – ‘to having many parts; diverse and varied’). [Read More...]


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