Where Is Mormonism On Civil Rights?

This week I went to an anti-racism rally here in Lexington, Virginia in response to Ku Klux Klan fliers being dropped around town. It was such a remarkable experience. It was uplifting and awesome for a multitude of reasons. I got to hear people stand and repudiate the KKK. A black Washington and Lee professor stood up and called on us to examine more than just the clearly racist actions of a few; to be introspective in how we are complicit in structural oppression and white supremacy. We stood … [Read more...]

The Courage and Light of Martin Luther King, Jr.

In a meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for the 1963 civil rights protests in Alabama that landed Martin Luther King, Jr. in a Birmingham jail, King warned his fellows: I want to make a point that I think everyone here should consider very carefully and decide if he wants to be with this campaign. . . . I have to tell you that in my judgment, some of the people sitting here today will not come back alive from this campaign. And I want you to think about it. Deadly violence … [Read more...]

Mitt Romney Still Doesn’t Want to Talk About Race in the Mormon Church

So the guy who was in charge of getting Barack Obama elected both times, David Axelrod, recently sat down for an interview with Mitt Romney. Romney, you might remember, was pretty convinced that Obama didn't deserve a second term in office. So much so that he ran against him. You might also recall that Romney lost.So the man who basically orchestrated what may turn out to be the final word in Mitt Romney's political career just had a cordial chat with him for about an hour, and then uploaded … [Read more...]

Souls, not Skin: Why I stand with the 3 new Apostles

Yes, I admit the natural woman in me was somewhat dismayed that the 'white American standard' within the Quorum of the Twelve was preserved last weekend when three new Apostles were called and sustained. However, I chose then and continue to choose now to trust that it was the right thing to do and that the callings were of God and not of man. Where each of the three new Brethren spoke of how President Monson told them their calls were from Deity, it makes me wonder if those who are criticizing … [Read more...]

Ahmed Mohamed, and The Need For A New Narrative

  Ahmed Mohamed, a high school student in Irving, Texas, had a rude awakening this past week when he brought a homemade clock to school. Much has already been written about Ahmed’s experience, as he appeared on Good Morning America, had a shout out from Mark Zuckerberg, and President Obama himself.One of his teachers thought the clock looked like a bomb, and alerted authorities. Ahmed was escorted out of class, handcuffed, and interrogated. He was not even allowed to call his p … [Read more...]

James Bond becoming more interesting and relevant isn’t a bad thing

 Idris Elba basically oozes everything one associates with James Bond. Pretty much everyone recognizes this. He's also an amazing actor (see: BBC's Luther, among other things). But recently, author Anthony Horowitz (who apparently writes James Bond novels?) thinks he is “too street” to do the job right. There are lots of problems with this, racism being the most apparent, but I'm also really interested in how this reflects our attitude toward longstanding franchise characters.As Kev … [Read more...]

The Risks and Revelations of Protest and Lament

On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass gave voice to the unspeakable injustice of American slavery in an address unrivaled either before or since. As a former slave, he spoke from profound experience. As an orator, he spoke with deft and sharpened words. “What, to the American slave,” he asked his white audience, “is your 4th of July?” The answer: “a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim.” This was not celebr … [Read more...]

Review: “Selma”

Selma deserves a Best Picture win, because even with all of its imperfections, it is a story that engages with history honestly and insightfully. It highlights an important part of the civil rights movement, enlightens a common narrative of a historical figure, yet respectfully keeps the integrity of Dr. King’s legacy intact.It is good history as far as narrative filmmaking goes. Somehow I’ve managed to keep up with most of the Oscar nominees this year, and a disproportionate number of them a … [Read more...]


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