What Biblical Scholars Do (since you were likely losing sleep about it)

Biblical scholars build models. A model is a way of accounting for as much of the available data as possible in as coherent and persuasive manner as possible, producing along the way as little cognitive dissonance as possible. A model is a hypothesis of what the “big picture” looks like. Models do not focus on biblical issues [Read More...]

Historical Criticism and Evangelicalism: A Uneasy Relationship (my post at respectfulconversation.net)

Over at Respectful Conversation, Harold Heie is continuing his series “American Evangelicalism: Present Conditions, Future Possibilities.” This month’s topic is “Evangelicalism and the Modern Study of Scripture.” My contribution to this topic is “Historical Criticism and Evangelicalism: An Uneasy Relationship. The purpose of this post is to offer a constructive description of the nature of [Read More...]

Evangelical Faith and the Challenge of Historical Criticism (a new book on a recurring problem)

Today we have an interview with Dr. Christopher M. Hays (DPhil, University of Oxford), who, along with Christopher B. Ansberry, has edited Evangelical Faith and the Challenge of Historical Criticism. Hays and Ansberry have brought together a dozen evangelical scholars to tackle some of the more vexing challenges of historical criticism—such as Adam, unfulfilled prophecy, the historical Jesus—and [Read More...]

Guess What: Your Presuppositions Don’t Automatically Make You a Better or Worse Interpreter of the Bible

A couple of weeks ago I posted on “3 ways I would like to see evangelical leaders stop defending the Bible.” The third way I was complaining about is the common claim that if one’s presuppositions are false, false conclusions are sure to follow. I see this not only among evangelical leaders but also now and [Read More...]

3 Things I Would Like to See Evangelical Leaders Stop Saying about Biblical Scholarship

On occasion I come across some sweeping public claims made by Evangelical leaders about the state of biblical scholarship. These claims may be genuinely felt, but they are still false, though they persist in the Evangelical subculture. 1. Historical Criticism is either dying or at least losing momentum in academia. Rather than assuming that the Bible [Read More...]


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