Breakfast Links for 11/06/12 – Political Idolatry; the Cinderella Dress; God and the Yankees

BREAKFAST LINKS 11/06/12:

Paul Kengor, Real Clear Religion: We Are Obama’s Brother’s Keeper

Joe Carter: “Every election season we’re reminded that God is neither a Republican nor a Democrat. From this obvious truth many people draw the conclusion that their choice in candidates is therefore morally equivalent. It isn’t.”

Steve Kornacki, Salon: The Obama Landslide Scenario

Fred Barnes: Why Romney Will Win.  Will Barnes, Barone and Noonan look like geniuses tomorrow, or will Nate Silver enjoy the praise instead?

Drew Dixon, Christ and Pop Culture: “I hope you vote wisely and thoughtfully tomorrow, but please, don’t buy into the idolatrous lie that your future hangs in the balance. If you are a Christian, I would encourage you, regardless of the results of tomorrow’s election, to be gracious, kind, and humble. Show the world that your hope is not in this life or in the things of this world, but in the One who offered Himself on the cross as a ransom for sinners.”

Richard Dahlstrom: “Son, life and death don’t matter, but right and wrong do. Daddy dead is Daddy still. But Daddy dishonored before God is something too awful for words.”

Diane Vincent, The Scriptorium: “But sooner or later, all this Cinderella talk was bound to result in some grandparent or other bringing home from Costco “for a great price”…the dress.”

David French: “Tomorrow is not about the grand gesture, it’s about commitment — individual commitment by a vast movement of people who know that life matters, that liberty matters, and that this — the greatest nation on earth — is destined for more than debt and decline.”

Peter Enns: “You say, “Well, if God is directing the current Yankee dynasty, why haven’t they won the World Series each year since 1996?” You ask because you do not understand the ways of God.”

Laurie Shrage, New York Times Opinion Pages: The End of Marriage

Clara Moskowitz, SPACE.com: The Best Space Photos Ever

About Timothy Dalrymple

Timothy Dalrymple was raised in non-denominational evangelical congregations in California. The son and grandson of ministers, as a young boy he spent far too many hours each night staring at the ceiling and pondering the afterlife.
 
In all his work he seeks a better understanding of why people do, and do not, come to faith, and researches and teaches in religion and science, faith and reason, theology and philosophy, the origins of atheism, Christology, and the religious transformations of suffering


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