Jeremy Lott, Rachel Held Evans, and Taboos in the Evangelical Christian Culture Industry

One duckling is not like the others.

In the attempt to track down sales figures for the evangelical Christian marriage book market, I found the following article by Jeremy Lott. He originally wrote it in 2003, but recently reposted it on his blog. The article discusses the range of products that make up the Christian culture market, including books. I think it’s [Read More...]

Checking Out of Privilege: Timothy Kurek’s “The Cross in the Closet” and What it Means to Change Your Identity

mask

What do John Howard Griffin, Barbara Ehrenreich, Timothy Kurek and Rachel Held Evans have in common? What do they have in common with Natalie Reed and “Thomas,” an anonymous subject of Kristin Schilt’s research on gender inequality in the experiences of transgender men in the workplace? What about with ex-fundamentalists like Libby Anne and me? [Read More...]

On Identity and Political Christianity

republican-jesus-poster

When I was growing up, I believed our church to be mostly apolitical. This was because we were anti-dominionist. As premillennialists (Christians who believe that Christ will return before the millennium, a period of paradise on earth), we believed that Western government was irredeemable and that getting involved in politics was submitting to “the prince [Read More...]

A snarky response to an annoying facebook post about poverty

If you can afford to buy a senator, you don't need a tax break.

So, I keep seeing this seriously problematic image circulating on facebook. It’s an ugly beige and red graphic with the following text: If you can afford beer, drugs, cigarettes, manicures and tattoos, you don’t need foodstamps or welfare. Now, first of all, let me critique this thing as quickly as possible: 1. What you’re basically saying [Read More...]

How do Food Stamps Work?

Food stamp card

Courtney at From Austin to A&M has an excellent article about food stamps that helps bust a number of myths about poor people at large cheating the system and spending their own money on frivolous things like televisions. There is also the fact that the surplus of refined food products in the United States means [Read More...]

Daughter of the Patriarchy: Ripping the Moorings, Part Two

My mother is stubborn. My father jokes that it’s the Polish in her (and me) that makes us clutch ideas so hard they fuse with our fingers and become permanent fists of stony resolve. This tenacity kept my mother with my father, kept her in church despite the disapproval of other women, kept her homeschooling [Read More...]

Libertarians, Welfare and Private Charities: Why Haven’t They?

I’ve written a little about the fact that my best friend in my teen years was a libertarian, and I thought I was, too. One of his go-to arguments for abolishing welfare was that private charities and churches would step up to fill the gap. At the time, I rolled my eyes at his naivete [Read More...]

15 Reasons Graduate School is Like a Religious Cult

Note: These are meant to be tongue-in-cheek. My graduate school experience is like one of the cushier New England convents with private swimming pools and flatscreen TVs than the forlorn mountainside shelters where monks beat each other with rocks and eat tree bark. 1. On the first day you arrive, you’re reminded that you’re part [Read More...]

From Austin to A&M: Don’t you know you’re not special?

Those who liked my Open Letter and Millennial Problems posts will really like this one from Courtney Stoker: From Austin to A&M: Don’t you know you aren’t special? An excerpt: I was told, proudly, that I was a per­fec­tion­ist, and no one even noticed that my per­fec­tion­ism was a gen­er­a­tional symp­tom of a pro­foundly dys­func­tional way [Read More...]

Libertarianism, Patriotism, and Starting Points: How I Apparently Became a Pinko Commie

I was seventeen when Ayn Rand captured the hearts of my best friend, Sven and his other male friend. “We’re libertarians,” they proclaimed proudly, though I had no idea what that meant. When I asked, they responded that I ought to read Atlas Shrugged, because it would open my eyes to the Way Politics Really [Read More...]


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