Checking Out of Privilege: Timothy Kurek’s “The Cross in the Closet” and What it Means to Change Your Identity

mask

What do John Howard Griffin, Barbara Ehrenreich, Timothy Kurek and Rachel Held Evans have in common? What do they have in common with Natalie Reed and “Thomas,” an anonymous subject of Kristin Schilt’s research on gender inequality in the experiences of transgender men in the workplace? What about with ex-fundamentalists like Libby Anne and me? [Read More...]

Disability and Abortion, Part Two: Individual moral choices are not categorical imperatives

This is not a case of The Right Choice for All vs. The Wrong Choice for All. If it were, it wouldn't be about choice.

I have been asked to write a response to S.E. Smith at Tiger Beatdown after both of our articles appeared on R.H. Reality Check. What follows is that response. My previous post titled Disability, Prenatal Testing and the Case for a Moral, Compassionate Abortion began with a long disclaimer in which I wrote, If you come [Read More...]

How do Food Stamps Work?

Food stamp card

Courtney at From Austin to A&M has an excellent article about food stamps that helps bust a number of myths about poor people at large cheating the system and spending their own money on frivolous things like televisions. There is also the fact that the surplus of refined food products in the United States means [Read More...]

Daughter of the Patriarchy: Ripping the Moorings, Part One

My family’s most diligent deceit never worked on me. My father told me not to worry about money. My mother told me that my focus should be on getting an education. They both told me that they didn’t want me to end up the way they did, ensnared in a financial trap. They told me [Read More...]

Libertarians, Welfare and Private Charities: Why Haven’t They?

I’ve written a little about the fact that my best friend in my teen years was a libertarian, and I thought I was, too. One of his go-to arguments for abolishing welfare was that private charities and churches would step up to fill the gap. At the time, I rolled my eyes at his naivete [Read More...]

Libertarianism, Patriotism, and Starting Points: How I Apparently Became a Pinko Commie

I was seventeen when Ayn Rand captured the hearts of my best friend, Sven and his other male friend. “We’re libertarians,” they proclaimed proudly, though I had no idea what that meant. When I asked, they responded that I ought to read Atlas Shrugged, because it would open my eyes to the Way Politics Really [Read More...]

Homeschooling: The Good

I liked being homeschooled. To this day, I have no problem with it. Nonetheless, I will scrutinize my experience a little bit and discuss how I think things could have gone better. Hence splitting up the topic into good, bad and ugly, like I did with homemaking. Let me state up front, however, that I [Read More...]

Homemaking: The Ugly

In my previous two posts, I pointed out the advantages (an orderly house, fresh food, simple living) to the homemaking ideal sold by evangelical-fundamentalist organizations like Vision Forum, Above Rubies, and individuals like Mary Pride. I also demonstrated some of the ways the inflexibility of that ideal leads to pain, frustration, a sense of persistent [Read More...]


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