An African Muslim Prince Goes to Boston in 1828

Muslim History Detective’s log, 2/26/2014 On a jubilant Boston afternoon in August of 1828, David Walker – an African-American merchant, civil rights activist and fierce abolitionist – delivered an intense toast at a banquet in honor of Abdul Rahman Ibrahima ibn Sori, a West-African born Muslim and prince who had been enslaved in the United States [Read More…]

Muslims in the House: A History Lesson Born from a Prayer in Congress

Muslim History Detective’s log, 08/7/13 TALIB SHAREEF, a retired U.S. Air Force veteran and imam of Washington, DC’s Masjid Muhammad, eloquently delivered the opening prayer during last Wednesday’s session of the U.S. House of Representatives. What a refreshing sight to behold during the final few days of the blessed month of Ramadan. At one point, [Read More…]

A Muslim in a New York State of Mind—Part 2

Muslim History Detective’s log, 05/30/13 On October 4, 1865, the anti-slavery, Tunisian Muslim General Otman Hashem arrived in New York via the steamship Persia. The very next day, the New York Times reported his stay in the city to be a one day rest stop before moving on to his intended destination of Washington, DC. [Read More…]

Muslim Ghosts of the Civil War

Muslim History Detective’s log, 03/19/13 “As our nation commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, one group has been wholly overlooked in the modern portrayals of how America ended slavery in the 1860s. Muslims. Wait…. What? Yes, Muslims played historic roles during this critical period (and others) in American history. In the past year, [Read More…]