Working People

Our corporate media lines up hard against working people. They extol the virtues of the rich and proclaim the necessity of robbing the worker in every situation, from maintaining an unequal tax structure that permits some to pile up great wealth while forcing workers to pay more than the Biblical ten percent on every loaf of bread and gallon of milk they buy. 

They yammer constantly about the totally fallacious “necessity” of cutting Social Security or putting it into the stock market where the wealthy can get a bite of it, but they say nothing about the vast corporate welfare and “privatization,” (Which is just a form of graft that attaches corporate profits to the tax base.) that is actually bankrupting the country. 

You would think, listening to them, that a living wage was robbery and robbing retirements and social security so that we go back to the practice of putting our elderly people in poor farms was righteousness. 

Who are working people?

I believe that would be you and me. And a few others in our past and present. Let’s have a look. 

Working People 

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Sonshine and Christopher Closeup

Do you need a spoonful of sugar to help the cynicism and anger of this campaign season go down? I can’t think of a better place to go looking for it than Christopher Closeup, written by fellow Patheos blogger, Tony Rossi.

Tony’s posts aren’t about May flowers and sunshine. They are about Sonshine; the grace of goodness and good that is all around us, if we just look for it.

For instance, what would you do if money came raining down in front of you? Would you keep it, or would you retrieve and return it to its rightful owner?

What Happened When a Volunteer Lost $800 Meant to Feed the Homeless? gives us one man’s answer. It is an affirmation of what good people are made of and how they behave when temptations float down on them from the car ahead.

As 77-year-old Jane Corbett drove to buy groceries for the St. Louis, Missouri, homeless shelter where she volunteers, hundreds of dollars were flying out of the envelope she had accidentally left on top of her car while buckling in her adopted special needs child.

Construction worker Ray Leuthauser, who was driving behind Corbett, saw what was happening and unsuccessfully honked at her to try to get her to stop. He finally just pulled over and started grabbing all the money flying around — over $300 — along with the Sam’s Club credit card that had come out of the envelope too.

The credit card was made out to Sts. Peter and Paul Church which is how Leuthauser tracked Corbett down to return the money … (Read more here.)

Check out Christopher Closeup next time you need a lift. You won’t be disappointed.


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