How Do You Do Lent in a Time of Feasting?

Lent

It’s still Lent.

We’ve got a week and a half of the deepest, darkest passage in human history to relive. Jesus arrested, betrayed, beaten, tortured, shamed and murdered; that’s what lies ahead of us in these next days.

We are approaching the depths of Lent; the remembrance of humanity’s greatest crime against innocence in the flesh. And we are almost there. 

But how do you do lent in a time of feasting? 

Last week, the Papal Conclave elected the first non-European pope in 1200 years, the first American pope and the first Jesuit pope in history. That conclave turned the Catholic world upside down … and left it unchanged.

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Pope Francis is the continuation of an unbroken line of popes going back to the moment when Jesus said “I will call you Peter.” The Church as a conduit of grace, a connection to the divine and a highway to heaven is untouched, unchanged and unchangeable. Despite the rancorous demands from some quarters that the Church re-write 2,000 years of Christian teaching to excuse the fashionable sins of our day, it will never do that. It has never done that; not for kings and princes, not for tanks and guns. 

Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today and forever. His Church, despite its human failings, is like Him in that. Nothing that matters, nothing that’s central to what the Church is, changes, has changed, or will change. 

Last week, we elected a pope. Yesterday, he celebrated his inaugural mass. It has been a week of spiritual feasting, a time to get drunk on the Spirit and wave flags, cheer and experience the jubilation of this proof of His continued presence in our lives. 

How do we come down from that to Passion Week and the awful reality of the crucifixion? 

Transfiguration

Perhaps, we do it the same way Peter, James and John did when they came down from the mount of Transfiguration. They saw something that no one had ever seen before or since, at least not in this life. They saw the transfigured Christ in His glory, conversing with Moses and Elijah — the law and the prophets. They saw the promise of what is to come, of the meaning on the other side of the cross that they were to preach for the rest of their days. 

We saw a glimpse of that same promise in this election and inauguration. Not the transfiguration, of course, but the promise of what it meant when Jesus told us “I am with you until the end of the world.” He was promising us that when we are lost, He will call us without ceasing. When we are found, He will walk with us through whatever we must face. He will speak to us through the Holy Spirit in our deepest hearts. He will come to us in the Eucharist and forgive us in confession. In all the years of our lives, he will never leave us without a shepherd to guide us and teach us and show us the way to Him.

This past week of two living popes and one unchanging church has not been the same mountain-top view of the Transfiguration that the three chosen Apostles experienced. But it has been the Transfiguration that the whole wide world needed at this time in history. 

Now, we must, as the Apostles had to, come down from the mountaintop and turn our faces toward Jerusalem. It is Lent, and the way we do Lent in a time of feasting is to face the magnitude of our sins and the unbelievable mercy that God has shown us. 

This year, like no other, we have been given our own view of Transfiguration. 

White crucifixion

Holy Father’s Inauguration: Videos of the Day

It was a historic day in Rome!

Once again, I wish so much that I could have been there. It’s hard, being tied down with a job, isn’t it? But then, jobs that pay the bills and provide meaningful work are blessings in themselves.

Since I couldn’t be there and film with my own camera, I trolled for videos that would capture the day for all of us. My personal favorite is when the Holy Father stopped the procession and got out of the Popemobile to bless a disabled man. Look at the expression on that man’s face. It says it all.

Here, for your enjoyment, are a few videos that I hope help you feel as if you were there.

Pope Francis receives the Papal Ring. 

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Pope Francis delivers Inaugural Mass homily.

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Pope Francis greets pilgrims after Inaugural Mass.

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Festive atmosphere at St Peter’s 

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Pope leaves popemobile to bless disabled man before Inaugural Mass

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That We May Be One: Wounds of a Thousand Years Begin to Heal

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Is a thousand years long enough to say you’re sorry?

Maybe, but for a long time, “sorry” wasn’t in the vocabulary of either side of what is known as the “Great Schism.” The Great Schism split the Church, East from West, around the year 1050. The Church has paid dearly for this split down through the past millennia, with the fall of Constantinople being part of the price.

From then to now, the thaw has been slow and touchy. Pope John Paul II paved the way by making the first moves toward reconciliation. Today, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Bartholomew I announced that he will attend the inauguration of Pope Francis.

Mark Shea made the poignant observation that Pope Francis, who only has one lung, is the pope under whom the Church will once again begin to breath with both lungs. None of this is to say that what we are looking at is a re-uniting of the two rites. But it is of incredible importance in a world in which Christians of every communion are increasingly subjected to hostility, outright discrimination and violent persecution that we come together in our mutual self defense.

The Patriarch of Constantinople surely understands this far better than I do.

We must begin to stand together.

I view this wonderful news as an indication that our leaders know this and are beginning to move toward doing it.

God bless both these men.

Deacon Greg Kendra has the story. Also, This article from AsiaNews.com gives details:

For the first time since the Great Schism, ecumenical patriarch to attend pope’s inaugural Mass
The metropolitans of Argentina and Italy will accompany Bartholomew. Moscow Patriarchate hopes in closer cooperation with Rome but excludes for now a meeting between Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill.

Istanbul (AsiaNews) – The Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Bartholomew I will attend Pope Francis’s inaugural Mass. The Ecumenical Patriarchate Press Office informed AsiaNews about the decision, noting that this is the first time such an event occurs since the Catholic-Orthodox split in 1054, an important sign for Christian unity.

The ecumenical patriarch will be accompanied by Ioannis Zizioulas, metropolitan of Pergamon and co-president of the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Roman Catholic and the Orthodox Church, as well as Tarassios, Orthodox Metropolitan of Argentina, and Gennadios, Orthodox Metropolitan of Italy.

Relations between Catholics and Orthodox have been improving since the Second Vatican Council through mutual visits, acts of friendship and theological dialogue.

Under Benedict XVI, the dialogue picked up in earnest after a lull. In trying to promote it, the pope suggested ways to express the primacy of Peter’s successor that could be acceptable to the Orthodox, finding his inspiration from the undivided Church of the first millennium. (Read the rest at: http://www.asianews.it/news-en/For-the-first-time-since-the-Great-Schism,-ecumenical-patriarch-to-attend-pope’s-inaugural-Mass-27408.html)


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