Star Wars or Star Trek?

TheoFantastique linked to a piece by Janice Vega asking about this, and offered one opinion. What about you? Which do you prefer?

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  • http://twitter.com/JeremiahBailey JeremiahBailey

    Both. Star Wars has that epic narrative feel, but Star Trek does better on the existential introspective side of things. 

  • Jeremiah

    Both. Star Wars has that epic narrative feel, but Star Trek does better on the existential introspective side of things. 

  • Paul D.

    Star Wars.

  • Paul D.

    Star Wars.

  • Anonymous

    False dichotomy! Why not both?

  • bobpatteson

    False dichotomy! Why not both?

  • Anonymous

    Comparing Star Trek to Star Wars is like comparing C. S. Lewis to J. R. R. Tolkien. Both are good, but one is clearly better.

    I’ve never been a fan of Star Trek’s racial profiling: Ferengi care about money; Vulcan’s are logical; Klingon’s seek glory in battle. It all feels very colonial; a sci-fi commentary on the current political climate (starting with the Cold War and moving onward). Often the whole thing is blatantly allegorical (like Lewis’ Narnia).
    Star Wars, on the other, works in a very different way. The opening crawl always asserts that these events occur in mythic time. “A long time ago, in a galaxy far far away” acts as a marker of mythic and cyclical time—what Eliade refers to as Illo Tempore. 

  • Jim Getz

    Comparing Star Trek to Star Wars is like comparing C. S. Lewis to J. R. R. Tolkien. Both are good, but one is clearly better.

    I’ve never been a fan of Star Trek’s racial profiling: Ferengi care about money; Vulcan’s are logical; Klingon’s seek glory in battle. It all feels very colonial; a sci-fi commentary on the current political climate (starting with the Cold War and moving onward). Often the whole thing is blatantly allegorical (like Lewis’ Narnia).
    Star Wars, on the other, works in a very different way. The opening crawl always asserts that these events occur in mythic time. “A long time ago, in a galaxy far far away” acts as a marker of mythic and cyclical time—what Eliade refers to as Illo Tempore.