The Great Religious Divide

Religion as mirror or magnifying glass

Here is something I wrote for Facebook when I shared a meme I made with a quote from Richard Rohr:

One of the biggest religious divides cuts across religious traditions rather than between them. It is the difference between those who treat religion as a magnifying glass to help expose and oppose the sins of others more effectively, and those who treat it as a mirror to help one’s own spiritual and moral life by fostering introspection and personal repentance and transformation.

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  • John MacDonald

    Jesus raises the “holier than thou rallying flag” of the self-righteous.

    • How so?

      • John MacDonald

        I was being sarcastic. lol. Jesus is the opposite of a “holier than thou” attitude. It’s ridiculous that people would condemn others, and then justify it, by invoking His name.

        • John MacDonald

          With the possible exception of The Temple Tantrum – lol

        • charlesburchfield

          yes it is and I’m glad you bring up the subject. I’ve been thinking a lot lately of the kubler-ross thingy about denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance stages of grief and loss. personally the divide for me was when I entered some of the stages of anger and bargaining was before I actually grocked what Jesus was saying. I am just one tiny Microscopic person who considers my inside condition to be church but I think the stages apply to the larger picture of the Meta Church: which I consider to be all of us humans whether one is intentionally, consciously aware of the Holy Spirit’s interventions and interactions or in a deep sleep of unawareness or denial. IMO it is only when one enters the stages of depression in extreme loss and grief where one no longer wants to live bc something essential to one’s being like loss of relationships one has held dear, the death of loved ones or when an addiction stops working does one pick up the thread of what Jesus was saying, believing, living through and living out. if one can escape out of the numbness of denial, be willing to tolerate the feelings of devastation that come rushing out at one & one is perhaps humbled enough because of depression one realizes one cannot escape the fact of one’s powerlessness to control people, places and things. to turn all such over to the care of one’s higher power one has finally reached the early stages of acceptance and may now hope with some confidence that that hope will not be disappointed and one wiil make contact that will begin the relationship with Holy Spirit & be given the grace to see it.

          • John MacDonald

            Sounds a little like Alcoholic’s Anonymous.

          • charlesburchfield

            you guesster chester! *[|°•)

          • John MacDonald

            That’s an interesting coincidence. I’ve struggled with alcoholism and faith in the past. I wrote a short story about it if you’re interested: http://www.caseagainstfaith.com/the-eternal-return.html

          • charlesburchfield

            hey I just want to thank you for turning me onto your blog! me and my spouse can definitely relate. my spouse is one and I am two if you know what I mean. your story reminds me of ‘the running with scissors’ chap.
            anyhoo I was really blessed by your stories bc I feel I have lived some of what you explain so articulately! being ‘dual’ is such a drag but it has ultimately been a blessing and been useful bc I was able to stay in the margins long enough to see how screwed up the system is &, in my opinion, I can critique it accurately as I heal from the source of my pain and reconnect with the intentional creativity that I feel God has invested me with.

          • John MacDonald

            It’s always nice to share ideas with others who have been through similar struggles – not my website, though. I just published a story there back in 2009

  • Phil Ledgerwood

    I wish there were a way to “like” posts. This is a great quote.

    • Sharing it on social media accomplishes the same thing! 🙂

      • Phil Ledgerwood

        I’d have to be social for that.

  • Amod Lele

    Why restrict this to “religions”? “Secular” political perspectives work the same way: do you work directly with existing or new institutions to make a better world as you see it, or do your political views function primarily as a way of highlighting and denouncing others’ sins?