Not In The Spaces We Know

A special issue of the Journal of Hebrew Scriptures, exploring the intersection of the Hebrew Bible and science fiction, is now available in print form as a book from Gorgias Press. The title is Not In The Spaces We Know, and I mentioned the online edition here previously. You can read the blog post that the volume’s editor and contributor Frauke Uhlenbruch wrote on the Patheos blog “Religion Now.”

Here is the blurb for the book:

This volume explores themes at the intersection of the Bible and science fiction. In the genre of science fiction in film, books, comic books, or fan fiction, we find portrayals of possible futures, altered pasts, supernatural or beyond-human beings. Just as in biblical literature, science fiction can contain metaphysical speculation. Departing from this intersection, the authors engage with biblical texts ‘as’ science fiction, asking different questions of their sources: can science fiction theory and practice yield new approaches to the discussion of biblical texts? The authors reflect on methodology and offer case studies that include, among others, superhuman biblical kings and uncanny divine intermediaries.

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  • John MacDonald

    The encountering of the historical Jesus of the Academy by a young student believer in the fundamentalist Christ of Faith reminds me of the following exchange between Q and Captain Picard:

    Capt. Picard: I understand what you’ve done here, Q. But I think the lesson could have been learned without the loss of 18 members of my crew.

    Q: If you can’t take a little bloody nose, maybe you ought to go back home and crawl under your bed. It’s not safe out here. It’s wondrous, with treasures to satiate desires both subtle and gross. But it’s not for the timid.

    • Gary

      I like the intersection of the Old Testament, Balaam’s donkey, with “Animal Farm”. The animal New Testament prophet, Old Major, perhaps following John Wesley’s lead in England:
      Animal Psalm?
      “I am old and my voice is hoarse, but when I have taught you the tune, you can sing it better for yourselves. It is called Beasts of England.’
      Old Major cleared his throat and began to sing. As he had said, his voice was hoarse, but he sang well enough, and it was a stirring tune, something between Clementine and La Cucaracha. The words ran:
      Beasts of England, beasts of Ireland, Beasts of every land and clime, Hearken to my joyful tidings
Of the golden future time.
      Soon or late the day is coming, Tyrant Man shall be o’erthrown, And the fruitful fields of England Shall be trod by beasts alone.
      Rings shall vanish from our noses, And the harness from our back, Bit and spur shall rust forever, Cruel whips no more shall crack.
      Riches more than mind can picture, Wheat and barley, oats and hay, Clover, beans, and mangel-wurzels Shall be ours upon that day.
      Bright will shine the fields of England, Purer shall its waters be,
Sweeter yet shall blow its breezes
On the day that sets us free.
      For that day we all must labour, Though we die before it break;
      Cows and horses, geese and turkeys, All must toil for freedom’s sake.
      Beasts of England, beasts of Ireland, Beasts of every land and clime, Hearken well and spread my tidings Of the golden future time.”

      This Psalm is obviously a rejection of Temple sacrifice, and a rejection of Balaam’s donkey’s subservience to man.