Stop Excusing Evil

Laura Robinson Trump quote

Laura Robinson wrote on Facebook:

You know, whenever Trump’s at his usual evil worst, I’m not even that angry at him. I’ve known what Trump was since I was eleven years old and saw him on television. I’ve never expected him to be anything else.

The people I really get mad at are the people from the Religious Right who looked at that man’s greed, sexism, racism, authoritarianism, and violence and decided to call a man like that a Christian so people would vote for him. And to be honest, I’m mad at the Christians who fell for it.

The post continues later:

I’m writing this really sincerely to the people of my parents’ generation who are members of the churches I grew up in. If you want the next generation of Americans to be Christians, there is only one way to do it: stop excusing evil. All the apologetics and outreach in the world will not make people join a church that refuses to name evil for what it is in the interest of political expediency. Stop caring about anything else until we get this right.

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  • Gary

    Clinton’s now infamous speech answered Robinson’s question. Not this part:

    “We are living in a volatile political environment. You know, to just be grossly generalistic, you could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables. Right? (Laughter/applause)”

    But this part:

    “— but that other basket of people are people who feel that the government has let them down, the economy has let them down, nobody cares about them, nobody worries about what happens to their lives and their futures, and they’re just desperate for change. It doesn’t really even matter where it comes from. They don’t buy everything he says, but he seems to hold out some hope that their lives will be different. They won’t wake up and see their jobs disappear, lose a kid to heroin, feel like they’re in a dead-end. Those are people we have to understand and empathize with as well.”

    Clinton (and Obama) did not do a good job on that.

    Robinson said… “I’m writing this really sincerely to the people of my parents’ generation who are members of the churches I grew up in. If you want the next generation of Americans to be Christians, there is only one way to do it: stop excusing evil.”

    I would say – “Stop lecturing your elders. Get over it. I am sure if Clinton was elected, you would attend church every Sunday (laughter and applause). In the meantime, take the advice of your mentor, Clinton, “Those are people we have to understand and empathize with as well.””

  • Neko

    If you want the next generation of Americans to be Christians, there is only one way to do it: stop excusing evil. All the apologetics and outreach in the world will not make people join a church that refuses to name evil for what it is in the interest of political expediency.

    Good for Laura Robinson; I concur. However, the religious right makes precisely the same accusation against progressive Christians.

    • John MacDonald

      I’m a little bothered by your quote from Robinson saying: “If you want the next generation of Americans to be Christians …” Apparently Robinson views America as a cultural melting pot rather than a cultural mosaic.

      • Neko

        It seems to me Robinson means the next generation from Christian families:

        I’m writing this really sincerely to the people of my parents’ generation who are members of the churches I grew up in.

        But even if her meaning is more expansive, Christians are supposed to attract converts. Christianity 101.

        • John MacDonald

          I know Christians are supposed to convert. I was just questioning how moral that is (the melting pot philosophy versus the mosaic philosophy).

          From beginning to end the purpose of the movement was to sell the new religion to the world:

          (A) 17 And Jesus said to them, “Follow Me, and I will make you become fishers of men.” (Mark 1:17)

          (B) The Great Commission
          16 Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. 17 When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. 18 Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” (Matthew 28:16-20)

          (C) Sending out Emissaries
          Just as Moses had chosen twelve spies to reconnoiter the land which stretched “before your face,” sending them through the cities of the land of Canaan, so does Jesus send a second group, after the twelve, a group of seventy, whose number symbolizes the nations of the earth who are to be “conquered,” so to speak, with the gospel in the Acts of the Apostles. He sends them out “before his face” to every city he plans to visit (in Canaan, too, obviously).

          (D) For Paul, Jesus resurrection is understood as the “first fruits” of the general resurrection, and so was a selling point for the new religion: “The end of the world is at hand, so you better join the winning team.”

          Christianity was all about winning converts and spreading the word, so it is no surprise that they succeeded doing just that:

          Locutus of Christ: You will be assimilated. Resistance is futile. lol https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyenRCJ_4Ww

          • Neko

            I think your interpretation of Robinson’s remarks are overdetermined.

  • John MacDonald

    Robinson says “The people I really get mad at are the people from the Religious Right who looked at that man’s greed, sexism, racism, authoritarianism, and violence and decided to call a man like that a Christian so people would vote for him.”

    Many people vote according to their liberal or conservative bias, and explain away characteristics of the politician that, in other contexts, they would find objectionable. This is why voters are so interested in getting in Supreme Court Justices that reflect their political biases, because the people know the judges will frame their decisions to support a particular political agenda and worldview.

    • John MacDonald

      After all, for instance, Trump isn’t the first to have objectionable treatment of women (E.g. Bill Clinton).

  • http://aebrain.blogspot.com Zoe_Brain

    The way things are to going, the next generation of Americans will be Christian all right. Christian just like Trump.