Enoch on Salome

The Enoch Seminar website includes a subsection devoted to the figure of Salome – who was obviously part of my course on the Bible and music last semester. Here is the link: http://www.4enoch.org/wiki4/index.php?title=Category:Salome_(subject)

It was in the process of looking for a musical snippet from among those mentioned on the Enoch Seminar site that I found this post-punk Japanese treatment…

"Jesus is coming.. the Bible is truth.. and there are going to be some VERY ..."

How Much of the Bible do ..."
"Hi James. You know, I never considered the parallel between subjective discoveries of backwards satanic ..."

Secret Mark and Rock Lyrics
"Since the scientific theory of evolution doesn't involve cats becoming dogs, that really doesn't seem ..."

How Much of the Bible do ..."
""DNA’s specificity limits its ability to change,"Please give evidence for that. (If you have it, ..."

How Much of the Bible do ..."

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!

What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • John MacDonald

    Mark may have been inventing the relationship of Salome to John the Baptist.Josephus does not mention Salome in his account of the death of John the Baptist. And Dennis MacDonald suggests Mark’s account of the death of the Baptizer may be a sort of mimesis on earlier Greek sources: Price points out that Dennis MacDonald shows how the story of John’s martyrdom matches in all essentials the Odyssey’s story of the murder of Agamemnon, even to the point that both are told in the form of an analepsis or flashback. Herodias, like Queen Clytemnestra, left her husband, preferring his cousin: Antipas in the one case, Aegisthus in the other. This tryst was threatened, in Clytemnestra’s case, by the return of her husband from the Trojan War, in Herodias’, by the denunciations of John. In both cases, the wicked adulteress plots the death of the nuisance. Aegisthus hosted a banquet to celebrate Agamemnon’s return, just as Herod hosted a feast. During the festivities Agamemnon is slain, sprawling amid the dinner plates, and the Baptizer is beheaded, his head displayed on a serving platter. Homer foreshadows danger awaiting the returning Odysseus with the story of Agamemnon’s murder, while Mark anticipates Jesus’ own martyrdom with that of John. The only outstanding difference, of course, is that in Mark’s version, the role of Agamemnon has been split between Herodias’ rightful husband (Philip according to Mark; another Herod according to Josephus) and John the Baptizer.

    • Nick G

      the story of John’s martyrdom matches in all essentials the Odyssey’s story of the murder of Agamemnon

      Gosh – I’d never realised Salome was married to John the Baptist! Or that John had sacrificed their daughter, or that their son then killed Salome!