Call for Papers on Personhood in Science Fiction

Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy

Call for Papers 

General Theme

The Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy, a peer-reviewed, open access publication, is dedicated to the analysis of philosophical themes present in science fiction stories in all formats, with a view to their use in the discussion, teaching, and narrative modeling of philosophical ideas. It aims at highlighting the role of science fiction as a medium for philosophical reflection.

The Journal is currently accepting papers and paper proposals. Because this is the Journal’s first issue, papers specifically reflecting on the relationship between philosophy and science fiction are especially encouraged, but all areas of philosophy are welcome. Any format of SF story (short story, novel, movie, TV series, interactive) may be addressed.

We welcome papers written with teaching in mind! Have used an SF story to teach a particular item in your curricula (e.g., using the movie Gattaca to introduce the ethics of genetic technologies, or The Island of Dr. Moreau to discuss personhood)? Turn that class into a paper!

 

Yearly Theme

Every year the Journal selects a Yearly Theme. Papers addressing the Yearly Theme are collected in a special section of the Journal. The Yearly Theme for 2017 is All Persons Great and Small: The Notion of Personhood in Science Fiction Stories.

SF stories are in a unique position to help us examine the concept of personhood, by making the human  world engage with a bewildering variety of beings with person-like qualities – aliens of bizarre shapes and customs, artificial constructs conflicted about their artificiality, planetary-wide intelligences, collective minds, and the list goes on. Every one of these instances provides the opportunity to reflect on specific aspects of the notion of personhood, such as, for example: What is a person? What are its defining qualities? What is the connection between personhood and morality, identity, rationality, basic (“human?”) rights? What patterns do SF authors identify when describing the oppression of one group of persons by another, and how do they reflect past and present human history?

The Journal accepts papers year-round. The deadline for the first round of reviews, both for its general and yearly theme, is October 1st, 2017.

Contact the Editor at editor.jsfphil@gmail.com with any questions, or visit www.jsfphil.org for more information.

 

 

 

"I think you've got your pattern in the wrong order: 1 - Historical events occur, ..."

Community Baptist Church
""Jesus believed that Genesis 1-11 was literal? I'll ask for a couple of references here..."Really. ..."

Historical Jesus: The Role Playing Game ..."
"Price sometimes strikes me as a "shock jock" who takes delight in adopting and advocating ..."

Moss and Baden on the Lastest ..."
"I didn't say anything that detracted from your post. I was merely emphasizing the NT's ..."

88 Reasons Why The Rapture Will ..."

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • John MacDonald

    I think an interesting paper might be how the Greek notion of δεινόν-deinon (uncanny / unhomely) is to be understood in distinction to the concept of παρἐστιοσ-parestios (one in the warmth of the hearth fire). This could be explored by relating themes of the passengers of Voyager in Star Trek trying to return home and Odysseus pining for home on the Island Of Calypso, the “δεινὴ θεός- deinē theos).” Exploring the relationship between parestios and deinon in this way would also provide an interesting opportunity to attempt a translation of Sophocles’ fundamental interpretation of humans in the Antigone when he writes “Polla ta deina kouden anthropou deinoteron pelei,” which is usually translated as “Many are the wonders and terrors but none more wondrous than man.”