Should You Be Making Games?

It was interesting to have an article come across my feed, providing guidance about whether one should quit one’s job and create video games instead, at the same time that I became aware that Leigh Grossman has a Kickstarter campaign for an RPG app: Do take a look, and consider either contributing or helping to [Read More…]

Studies in Late Antiquity

Via Jim Davila, I learned about this fascinating new book series that Edinburgh University Press has launched, which will be a good venue for, among other things, those who work on the Mandaeans. Alternative Histories: Narratives from the Middle East and Mediterranean Series Editor(s): Sargon Donabed Explores the narratives of minority communities and individuals in [Read More…]

Preservation through Quotation: From Q to Doctor Who

When a clickbait title says that there are 30 things I never knew about The Force Awakens, or 9 outrageously awesome Doctor Who facts, I tend to be skeptical, but may well click through nonetheless. It was genuinely new information for me that the footage of the Beatles appearing on Top of the Pops has been lost, [Read More…]

Rome in a Day, Part 1: An Overarching Arc of Arches and Archaeology

I am in Italy for the first time, and will be heading to Camaldoli today by way of Arezzo to attend the Enoch Seminar on John’s Christology and/as Jewish Messianism. Jim Davila mentioned that the last time he was there the wifi was “primitive,” and so liveblogging the conference may not be possible. Yesterday I [Read More…]

Ten Prayers that Changed the World

I am grateful to have the opportunity to participate in a blog tour about Jean-Pierre Isbouts’ latest book, Ten Prayers That Changed the World. The book takes the fascinating approach of choosing individuals, and key historical moments connected to or surrounding those individuals, which also gave rise to famous prayers. Isbouts approaches the subject as a historian, and he treats the [Read More…]

Venturing Outside One’s Area of Expertise

Everyone is talking about Neil de Grasse Tyson’s problematic tweets – see the recent blog posts by Jerry Coyne, Hemant Mehta, and P. Z. Myers. But I think the most important post on the topic is that by Jonathan Bernier. He points out that, once someone moves outside of their field of expertise, no matter how [Read More…]

Jesus, Sherlock Holmes, and Hercules

Internet apologists for mythicism are always ready to point to Sherlock Holmes and Batman and say “look, here we have stories, so these prove the existence of fictional detectives and comic book heroes, don’t they?” Can they not see that this is absolute silliness, that one could respond with the same trite comeback about anyone [Read More…]

Recreation of Rome in the Era of Constantine

Thanks to the Khan Academy for making the above video, and George Athas for sharing it. This is a recreation of what Rome looked like in the era of Constantine. I hope you enjoy your virtual visit to the ancient world! [Read more…]

Epiphany and History

Having attempted to do away with contradictions between Matthew and Luke for Christmas, Ian Paul has now offered a blog post claiming that Matthew’s story of the arrival of the magi can be treated as historical. I am not persuaded. Infancy stories featuring miracles are a common feature in ancient literature, and are consistently devoid [Read More…]


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