More on Mumpsimus

Two comments on my recent “Mumpsimus” post seemed worth sharing. First, James Snapp shared an anecdote about the origin of the term: The story goes that there was a medieval priest who habitually mispronounced part of the liturgy; when he was supposed to say “sumpsimus” (we have taken/consumed), he instead said “mumpsimus,” a non-word. He [Read More…]

We Love Hurting People

Unfortunately the sentence on this church sign can be understood in two different ways. And unfortunately there are churches for which each of the possible meanings is true.   [Read more…]

The Old is New Again

By John Atkinson   [Read more…]

Diet Gospels?

Jim West posted the above photo featuring personalized Coke bottles available in the UK. I knew that Jim had really gone off the rails lately, but I had not realized quite how badly. Matthew and John as (according to the label colors) diet Gospels? Hmph!   [Read more…]

Simplified Blogging

By John Atkinson. HT Open Parachute   [Read more…]

The Religion Scholars Song

Here’s a song written with the aim of using rhyme to help you remember key points about theologians and religion scholars of the 20th century. Of course, such aims often prove harder to fulfill than one had hoped. Enjoy the silliness! I expect that those who’ve studied religion or been to seminary will get the [Read More…]

The Kryptonian Harold Camping

Via Scotteriology   [Read more…]

Goodbye, Google Reader!

    Thanks to Jeremy Myers for the inspiration to make the above image!   [Read more…]

John Williams is the Man

I shared this  a cappella humorous tribute to John Williams a couple of years ago, but it is worth bringing out and sharing again from time to time. I was reminded of it by the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra on Facebook, which is currently performing a series of concerts featuring John Williams’ music.   [Read more…]

The Hero’s Journey as Explained by Puppets

Thanks to IO9 to sharing this explanation of Joseph Campbell’s idea of the hero’s journey, the set of standard features that recur in human storytelling, sometimes referred to as the monomyth. It actually does an impressive job of illustrating not just that there are recurring features, but also that myths, legends, and storytelling often switch [Read More…]