Poverty in the Biblical World and Today

Another statement from a program unit of the Society of Biblical Literature: It seems that studying poverty, whether in ancient times or today, makes people more sympathetic to the plight of the poor. [Read more…]

Biblical Scholars Stand With Refugees

If it has been disheartening to see the actions of America’s president and his supporters, and the harmful effects on people that those actions have had on refugees and other extremely vulnerable constituencies, it has been encouraging to see so many people of different backgrounds being united in their outspokenness against these policies. I plan [Read More…]

Triple-Sponsored #CFP for #AARSBL17 – The Impact of Digital Humanities on the Study of Non-Canonical Texts

The Impact of Digital Humanities on the Study of Non-Canonical Texts One or two Traditions of Eastern Late Antiquity (AAR) sessions in 2017 will be co-sponsored with the SBL Digital Humanities and Pseudepigrapha program units. All papers for these sessions should explore the influence of the Digital Humanities in general, and the ongoing digitization of [Read More…]

Aramaic Magic Bowls at #AARSBL16

I found that there is one disadvantage to blogging on one’s phone: it can look like you are texting rather than taking notes or blogging, and so I wasn’t comfortable doing so while seated at the front in the Digital Humanities session where I presented on the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife. And so I will [Read More…]

Immigration and the Changing Face of America at #AARSBL16

I attended a Council for Foreign Relations lunch that was simply fascinating. In a recent survey, Americans were divided almost evenly in their answer to the question of whether America has gotten better or worse since the 1950s. That mirrors the different campaign slogans in the recent election: the backward-looking “Make America Great Again” vs. [Read More…]

The Gospel of Jesus’ Wife and Raman Spectography at #AARSBL16

I was only able to catch the end of Brent Nongbri’s paper about the dating of papyri. It was David Ratzan, Sarah Goler, and James Yardley about the development of new non-destructive means of dating carbon-based inks, in order to assess the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife.  They did not set out with the hypothesis that [Read More…]

Meeting Mandaeans at #AARSBL16

I am so grateful to Jorunn Buckley for organizing a meeting between scholars who work on the Mandaean religion, and two representatives of the Mandaean community here in San Antonio. We had fascinating conversations about the challenges their scattered small communities face, and explored practical ways that scholars might be able to support them. [Read more…]

Scholarly Communication at #AARSBL16

Before heading to the 1pm Digital Humanities session on scholarly communication, I saw a tweet saying that if publishers want to reach the public and have them well informed, we cannot continue to make academic books so ridiculously expensive. In the session, John Kutsko talked about SBLCentral, a project to move beyond RBL to a [Read More…]

Feminism is for Everybody at #AARSBL16

I am presenting at the same time as the above session, but if you weren’t going to come to hear my paper about the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife anyway, then that is where you should be. [Read more…]

My contribution to the review panel about Ancient Worlds in Digital Culture at #AARSBL16

Here are my thoughts on the first volume in the Digital Biblical Studies series from E. J. Brill, Ancient Worlds in Digital Culture, which I am offering in a review panel that is occurring right now in San Antonio. My own contribution focuses on chapters 1, 5, and 9-12. This first volume in the new Brill series, [Read More…]