Moses on Moses

I came across the above meme, which nicely highlights one of many absurdities that result from viewing Moses as the author of the Pentateuch. [Read more…]

Were the Titles of the Gospel on #Sillyboi?

You may think I’m a “silly boy” for writing about this. But when Sarah Bond recently wrote a blog post about the ancient Greek use of a tag (sillybos) to indicate the author and title of a work on a scroll, I felt I needed to blog in a bit more detail about the possible implications of [Read More…]

Chronicles as Evidence for Deutero-Isaiah

Today my class on the Bible focused on stories from among the Writings, the third major section of the Hebrew Bible, including Chronicles. I was struck that the ending of Chronicles provides important evidence for the multiple authorship of the Book of Isaiah. In 2 Chronicles 36:22, the author makes much of the fact that the [Read More…]

Brant Pitre, The Case for Jesus

I am delighted to have the opportunity to participate in the Patheos Book Club about Brant Pitre's recent book, The Case for Jesus: The Biblical and Historical Evidence for Christ. Pitre's book touches on a number of points that have been mentioned, or indeed the focus of sustained attention, on this blog as well as [Read More…]

Revelation by the Numbers

Ian Paul shared this chart a while back, suggesting that it provides evidence for the unity of Revelation. I’m not so sure – I’m not entirely persuaded by redactional proposals, but I definitely see why such solutions to the puzzles of Revelation appeal to some. What do readers of this blog think? Is the Book [Read More…]

Luke Volume 3

Jonathan Bernier raised some interesting problems with suggestions that are often made regarding why Luke ended Acts where he did. The open ending doesn’t really work well as a defense of Paul’s innocence, if the work was written after Paul’s death. That does not, however, mean that we must embrace as the only alternative dating Acts to soon after [Read More…]

What Could a Fisherman Compose?

I shared a link to a blog post by Jonathan Bernier a while back, which questioned the relevance of the purported employment of the traditionally-proposed author of the Fourth Gospel. Here’s a list which someone put together of occupations of tannaitic rabbis: The sages of the Talmud worked at many diverse occupations. For instance, Hillel was [Read More…]

Identification of Authors in Ancient Literature

A discussion here on this blog brought up the question of whether other ancient works may, like the Gospels, have initially circulated without an author being indicated, with the attribution to the author being added only subsequently to the manuscript tradition. This led to a blog post by Matthew Ferguson, which made comparisons to the works of [Read More…]

Authorship of 2 Thessalonians

Towards the end of the semester in my Paul class, we’ve focused on the disputed and inauthentic epistles attributed to Paul. One detail that never struck me quite as forcefully before about 2 Thessalonians is its ending: “ I, Paul, write this greeting with my own hand. This is the mark in every letter of mine; [Read More…]

Thanks, Google

A student pointed out to me that, if you ask Google “Who wrote the Pentateuch?” you get the answer, in big, bold letters, “Moses.” I decided to click the “feedback” button and indicate that this is incorrect. Here’s what I wrote as explanation for why I thought so: There has been extensive research on this [Read More…]


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