What’s on Your Gen Con Event Wish List?

The program for Gen Con was made available online on Sunday. That means that you can search for keywords such as “gamification,” “education,” or “McGrath and find the session that my Butler University colleagues and I are hosting.  I was somewhat dismayed to see that they have scheduled a session about using games to teach [Read More…]

Viva La Library Live

This is a recording of the first ever live performance of the information literacy song, Viva La Library. This took place at the opening ceremony of the Butler Summer Games on May 10th, 2017. Performed by the LibCats.   [Read more…]

What’s Your Source?

Dawn Trautman shared this image on Facebook. Does it match your perception of these sources? If not, do you assume that the issue is with the chart, or with your perception?   Also, does the infographic itself convey the message that being a political centrist is more correct than leaning to the right or left? Isn’t [Read More…]

Fact Checking Politics and History

I constantly tell my students that the skills they learn in my classes are transferable, and so even if they are not especially interested in the subject matter, the things they learn to do are applicable to other areas of life. As we near the end of this election season, I am struck by how [Read More…]

If I Had a Denarius

Robert Piper offered this quip on Facebook as a comment on another meme, and I thought it deserved to become a meme in its own right, and so (with his permission), here it is. [Read more…]

CIC Information Fluency Workshop

I am currently in Baltimore with some colleagues, at a workshop focused on information fluency in the disciplines of religion, philosophy, and the history of ideas. It started yesterday, and has already offered a lot of fascinating perspectives from faculty and librarians, including practical examples and specific online tools that can be used for teaching [Read More…]

Quote for the Start of Semester

The quote from Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, comes from an article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, “Wikipedia Founder Discourages Academic Use of His Creation.” The same can be said of the dictionary – I find it hard to believe that I get students starting essays with “Webster’s Dictionary defines…” – or worse still, [Read More…]

Viva La Library Remix

I feel quite honored – my parody of “Viva La Vida,” “Viva La Library (The Information Literacy Song),” has been covered by the librarians at Ivy Tech Community College. I think they did a great job, and needless to say the video itself is much more impressive than my still slides with the words. They made a [Read More…]

Thanks, Google

A student pointed out to me that, if you ask Google “Who wrote the Pentateuch?” you get the answer, in big, bold letters, “Moses.” I decided to click the “feedback” button and indicate that this is incorrect. Here’s what I wrote as explanation for why I thought so: There has been extensive research on this [Read More…]

Too Old

A student sent me this e-mail recently: Dr. McGrath, Sorry about the multiple emails. I’m not sure if we went over this or not but I was wondering what your thoughts were on about how far back we should go when deciding which articles to use? I have all mine set, but one is from the [Read More…]