Another Christian “Dominionist”?

With all this talk of certain Republican Christians and their alleged connection to Dominionism--a view inaccurately ascribed to several Christian writers in articles published in the New York Times and the New Yorker--there's one Christian that our East-of-the-Hudson betters seemed to miss. Here are his shocking comments, where he explains how America's laws should reflect God's eternal law: Just as the prophets of the eighth century B.C. left their villages and carried their "thus saith the … [Read more...]

The Bible Made Impossible: Why Biblicism is Not a Truly Evangelical Reading of Scripture

That is the title of a new book by Notre Dame sociologist, Christian Smith. I received my copy of it yesterday, and I cannot put it down. (Readers of Return to Rome may recall that in June I blogged about Professor Smith's other recent book, How to Go From Being a Good Evangelical to a Committed Catholic in Ninety-Five Difficult Steps (Cascade Books 2011). My endorsement of the book is on its back cover). Unsurprisingly, The Bible Made Impossible is causing quite a stir on the internet.Over at … [Read more...]

Mormonism and Natural Law

That's the title of my latest entry over at The Catholic Thing. Here's how it begins: With the increasing likelihood that Mitt Romney will be the Republican nominee for President, it is important for Catholics and other Christians to reflect on some concerns raised by Damon Linker in a 2007 New Republic article. Linker argues that Mormon theology does not have important resources that traditional Christians have at their disposal, such as natural-law theory.Although LDS writings say little … [Read more...]

Libertarians for Life: A Nice Resource

You can find their website here. … [Read more...]

C. Stephen Evans on Kierkegaard

My Baylor colleague, C. Stephen Evans, was interviewed earlier this week on KGO radio in San Francisco. The topic was the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, a thinker about which Steve knows quite a bit. You can listen to the interview here. … [Read more...]

The Eucharist and Cannibalism

My Baylor colleague, Michael P. Foley (associate professor of patristics), is a new contributor to The Catholic Thing. His first entry was published today. Entitled, "The Eucharist and Cannibalism," it begins this way: Perhaps the most disconcerting Catholic doctrine is the Real Presence of Jesus Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. Many people today have the same reaction as those disciples who heard Jesus preach it for the first time in Capernaum and were scandalized, “This saying is hard, and who … [Read more...]

Why I’m Catholic: Philosopher Richard Sherlock

There is a wonderful new website, "Why I'm Catholic," or www.whyimcatholic.com. Among the many stories on this site is the one told by my friend, Richard Sherlock, Professor of Philosophy at Utah State University. Richard, who was received into the Catholic Church just this past Easter Sunday (2011), is a convert from Mormonism. He begins the account of his journey in this way: One should never leave the religion in which one was born or raised for anything but the most serious of reasons. Warm f … [Read more...]

Thomson’s “A Defense of Abortion” at Forty

That's the title of my latest entry over at The Catholic Thing. It is adapted from portions of my August 3, 2011 presentation at the University of Colorado symposium commemorating the 40th anniversary of Thomson’s article. Here's an excerpt: What Thomson is granting, then, is a view of personhood consistent with the pro-life position only insofar as it is aligned with a minimalist understanding of autonomy and choice. That view isolates the individual from other persons – generationally, contem … [Read more...]

August 3 Symposium on the 40th anniversary of Judith Jarvis Thomson’s “A Defense of Abortion”

Tomorrow, August 3, I will be at the University of Colorado in Boulder participating in a symposium on the 40th anniversary of Judith Jarvis Thomson article, "A Defense of Abortion," published in 1971 in Philosophy and Public Affairs. (For more on the symposium, go here. It is open to the public.) What makes Thomson's argument so important is that she grants to the prolifer his most pivotal premise, that the pre-born human is a person from conception, but nevertheless concludes that abortion is … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X