The Immaculate Conception, St. Thomas Aquinas, and the Catholic Church

Today, December 8, is the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. Sometimes my Evangelical Protestant friends, knowing that I am a Thomist, will point out that St. Thomas Aquinas did not believe in the Immaculate Conception, suggesting that the Church should have stuck with St. Thomas and not declared the Immaculate Conception a dogma. For example, my friend Norm Geisler writes: "Many of the Catholic beliefs that concern Protestants most were not declared dogma until long after Aquinas. For example, … [Read more...]

Catholics Come Home

Every time I watch this video I get choked up. You can find out more about Catholics Come Home here. It is a wonderful website. … [Read more...]

Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta will vote on reversing condemnation of Pelagius

(HT: Rod Dreher). Over 1500 years in the making, Pelagius is making an ecclesiastical comeback. The story begins: The [Episcopal] Diocese of Atlanta has been asked to rehabilitate Pelagius. Delegates to the diocesan convention will be asked to reverse the condemnation of the Council of Carthage upon Pelagius, and to explore whether the Fifth century heretic may inform the theology of the Episcopal Church. Resolution R11-7 before the convention states in part: “Whereas the historical record … [Read more...]

“From Catholic to Evangelical and Back Again: A Christian Philosopher’s Journey.”

That is the title of a talk I am giving on November 2 at 7 pm at Baylor University's St. Peter's Catholic Student Center. You can find out more information here. If you want to learn more about St. Peter's, go here. … [Read more...]

The Christian University

That's the title of my latest entry over at The Catholic Thing. It is adapted from my September 23, 2011 talk at the installation of Myron Steeves as Dean of Trinity Law School. Here's how it begins: As is evident by where and how we mark this event – in a church, accompanied by prayer and song – Trinity Law School, and the university of which it is a part, is Christian. “Christian” may seem a mere adjective that modifies “university” or “law school” in the same way that … [Read more...]

Revelation, Sacred Tradition, and the Magisterium

That's the title of my latest column over at The Catholic Thing. Here's how it begins: This past Tuesday, September 13, I taught my first RCIA class, offered at St. Peter’s Catholic Student Center at Baylor University. Although I have been teaching philosophy to college students for twenty-five years, I was a bit nervous. Thankfully, I have a minor role in the class, leading only one session this semester with perhaps another one or two in the Spring. Our RCIA team consists of several … [Read more...]

Another Christian “Dominionist”?

With all this talk of certain Republican Christians and their alleged connection to Dominionism--a view inaccurately ascribed to several Christian writers in articles published in the New York Times and the New Yorker--there's one Christian that our East-of-the-Hudson betters seemed to miss. Here are his shocking comments, where he explains how America's laws should reflect God's eternal law: Just as the prophets of the eighth century B.C. left their villages and carried their "thus saith the … [Read more...]

The Bible Made Impossible: Why Biblicism is Not a Truly Evangelical Reading of Scripture

That is the title of a new book by Notre Dame sociologist, Christian Smith. I received my copy of it yesterday, and I cannot put it down. (Readers of Return to Rome may recall that in June I blogged about Professor Smith's other recent book, How to Go From Being a Good Evangelical to a Committed Catholic in Ninety-Five Difficult Steps (Cascade Books 2011). My endorsement of the book is on its back cover). Unsurprisingly, The Bible Made Impossible is causing quite a stir on the internet. Over at … [Read more...]

Mormonism and Natural Law

That's the title of my latest entry over at The Catholic Thing. Here's how it begins: With the increasing likelihood that Mitt Romney will be the Republican nominee for President, it is important for Catholics and other Christians to reflect on some concerns raised by Damon Linker in a 2007 New Republic article. Linker argues that Mormon theology does not have important resources that traditional Christians have at their disposal, such as natural-law theory. Although LDS writings say little … [Read more...]

C. Stephen Evans on Kierkegaard

My Baylor colleague, C. Stephen Evans, was interviewed earlier this week on KGO radio in San Francisco. The topic was the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, a thinker about which Steve knows quite a bit. You can listen to the interview here. … [Read more...]


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