Warming up to these ideas yet?

With a world conference beginning to address the issue of climate change, I found two interesting reads this morning in the New York Times.  The first is about the conference itself, particularly the cries from the far right about the possibilities of dire economic consequences if we actually take steps to address the issue.  Really?  I was in Germany last week, which is cloudy like Seattle, and farther north, and yet while traveling by train I passed dozens of solar farms, acres of solar panels quietly creating energy without carbon emissions.  At least 30% of the houses seem to have some form of supplemental solar heating.  Cars get 40 miles to the gallon and upward.  Farther north, it’s wind that’s energizing the Netherlands.  Yes, it surely appears that Europe is in the midst of a disaster due to their commitment to be green.  In fact, American companies that are working in solar are considering relocating, not because of labor costs, but because the market for their products is Europe and Asia.

The reality is that we’re in the midst of an economic change in the same fashion that we moved to cars from trains at the beginning of the 20th century.  However, that wasn’t exactly a pure free market was it:  roads, an absolute necessity for cars, came from – tax dollars.  The government intervened and provided infrastructure (surely one of it’s responsibilities).  Why we are afraid of such intervention today?

And before either the left or the right warm up to any of the proposed health care plans, we’d be wise to consider this material, and much more like it that calls us to address prevention.  If we go down “prevention” road, however, we’ll need to start thinking about so many things:  exercise habits, sleep habits, anti-biotics in food, chemicals in everything.  Far easier, I suppose, to simply try (if you’re on the left) to push everyone into a bigger system that is much the same as what we have now, or (if you’re on the right) let the market take care things.

I’d advocate that we shift our paradigm towards prevention and building healthy lifestyles through education and incentives. But, like climate change, such an enormous paradigm shift would be unthinkable because the cost to drug companies, the insurance industry, and some medical establishments would be too high.  When the day is done, though we all acknowledge change is needed, I’m wondering if we have the will to make the hard choices on any either important issue, health care, or the environment?

About Richard Dahlstrom

As Pastor of Bethany Community Church in Seattle, Richard teaches with vision of "making the invisible God visible" by calling people to acts of service and blessing. It's working, as a wilderness ministry, homeless shelter, and community meals that serve those living on the margins are all pieces of Bethany's life. "We're being the presence of Christ" he says, "and inviting everyone to join the adventure." Many have, making Bethany one of the fastest growing churches in America in 2009 according to Outreach Magazine.

  • Kevin

    It seems that the impediment to this whole process is not a lack of will as much as it is a plurality of wills, diverse such that it is seemingly impossible to guide the whole of the body in one direction. Much like the dialog in response to your post on ecumenism, even when there seems to be some consensus on a particular goal or desired outcome, perspectives and opinions often vary so widely that steps in any direction serve onto to further the ideological divide. Don’t get me wrong, I agree with you on the habits necessary to move humanity towards a healthier and more sustainable existence, but I also remember that the bad habits that we desire to move away from were once embraced as a remedy to a prior ailment. We didn’t put chemicals in food or work 60-hour weeks out of a desire to bring about our own demise; we did so to survive a very tangible threat to our existence, regardless of how we might see it in hindsight. True, the choices that we made helped put quite a lot of money in the pockets of the very few, but many were simply providing a product in response to demands of the market. While I want to see the world embrace healthier lifestyle choices, will these present-day choices serve only to become the woes of future generations? Will we one day lambaste the solar-energy moguls and wind farm tycoons for their opportunistic greed?

    • raincitypastor

      heard lots of great stuff about your preaching yesterday… be encouraged!

      RD

    • raincitypastor

      I was recently reading the blog of a doctor and he said that the best advice he ever received while in med school was when a senior physician said, “half the things you now believe to be true w/ regards to medicine, will be wrong by the time you retire”… this is because we’re continually need to adapt to further understanding and growth.

      We surely need to be willing to ‘do the next thing’, even if the next thing might, in a generation, prove to have been deficient. Otherwise we end up trying to freeze time, a hopeless, defensive, arrogant, and petty way to live.

      Of course, when it comes to doctrine and wine skins… some things change, and some things never do, but that’s a discussion we’ve already had.

      • Kevin

        I agree with you one-hundred percent; life is a ceaseless ballet where even death is merely one of the many steps. Adaptation to change is as natural and as necessary as the tides, and just as involuntary. As with the tide, we have the benefit of hindsight, peering into the tidal pools of history to see what shapes have been carved into the shore, what life has remained despite the rushing and churning waters, before we sweep back in to meet the shore again. I think of every sandcastle I’ve ever built and how each one eventually crumbled under the incoming tide, the hours spent on each parapet falling away with each successive wave, and the memory of presence smoothed back into anonymous seashore. My point is not that we should seek to restrain the tide nor spend our efforts diverting or changing its direction, but that we remember that we are not the first to have built houses of sand, not the first to have failed in the attempt.

      • Dan

        Richard,

        “Of course, when it comes to doctrine and wine skins… some things change, and some things never do, but that’s a discussion we’ve already had”.

        Don’t want to pick this scab Richard, so I apologize in advance, but what doctrines of Christ have changed since his time? Or did you mean doctrine doesn’t change, and wineskins do? If that’s the case, I get the analogy.

        Seriously, I’m sorry if it feels like I’m nit-picking, or if it’s just a matter of verbiage that I’m not getting…but I really want to know what you mean. It’s very likely that I’m just a simple tool who didn’t understand.

        In humble query,
        Dan

  • Kevin

    It seems that the impediment to this whole process is not a lack of will as much as it is a plurality of wills, diverse such that it is seemingly impossible to guide the whole of the body in one direction. Much like the dialog in response to your post on ecumenism, even when there seems to be some consensus on a particular goal or desired outcome, perspectives and opinions often vary so widely that steps in any direction serve onto to further the ideological divide. Don’t get me wrong, I agree with you on the habits necessary to move humanity towards a healthier and more sustainable existence, but I also remember that the bad habits that we desire to move away from were once embraced as a remedy to a prior ailment. We didn’t put chemicals in food or work 60-hour weeks out of a desire to bring about our own demise; we did so to survive a very tangible threat to our existence, regardless of how we might see it in hindsight. True, the choices that we made helped put quite a lot of money in the pockets of the very few, but many were simply providing a product in response to demands of the market. While I want to see the world embrace healthier lifestyle choices, will these present-day choices serve only to become the woes of future generations? Will we one day lambaste the solar-energy moguls and wind farm tycoons for their opportunistic greed?

    • raincitypastor

      I was recently reading the blog of a doctor and he said that the best advice he ever received while in med school was when a senior physician said, “half the things you now believe to be true w/ regards to medicine, will be wrong by the time you retire”… this is because we’re continually need to adapt to further understanding and growth.

      We surely need to be willing to ‘do the next thing’, even if the next thing might, in a generation, prove to have been deficient. Otherwise we end up trying to freeze time, a hopeless, defensive, arrogant, and petty way to live.

      Of course, when it comes to doctrine and wine skins… some things change, and some things never do, but that’s a discussion we’ve already had.

      • Kevin

        I agree with you one-hundred percent; life is a ceaseless ballet where even death is merely one of the many steps. Adaptation to change is as natural and as necessary as the tides, and just as involuntary. As with the tide, we have the benefit of hindsight, peering into the tidal pools of history to see what shapes have been carved into the shore, what life has remained despite the rushing and churning waters, before we sweep back in to meet the shore again. I think of every sandcastle I’ve ever built and how each one eventually crumbled under the incoming tide, the hours spent on each parapet falling away with each successive wave, and the memory of presence smoothed back into anonymous seashore. My point is not that we should seek to restrain the tide nor spend our efforts diverting or changing its direction, but that we remember that we are not the first to have built houses of sand, not the first to have failed in the attempt.

      • Dan

        Richard,

        “Of course, when it comes to doctrine and wine skins… some things change, and some things never do, but that’s a discussion we’ve already had”.

        Don’t want to pick this scab Richard, so I apologize in advance, but what doctrines of Christ have changed since his time? Or did you mean doctrine doesn’t change, and wineskins do? If that’s the case, I get the analogy.

        Seriously, I’m sorry if it feels like I’m nit-picking, or if it’s just a matter of verbiage that I’m not getting…but I really want to know what you mean. It’s very likely that I’m just a simple tool who didn’t understand.

        In humble query,
        Dan

  • Linda

    Rain City Pastor, why are you so into politics??? We do not see the Lord Jesus Christ, nor the apostles making a big deal about political issues of their day, do we???

    • Glenda

      Political issues…like the CRC? ;)

  • raincitypastor

    I’m into politics Linda, because the church in Germany wasn’t ‘into politics’ and so watched while six million Jews were put in gas ovens, as they continued to go to church every Sunday. I’m into politics because Rwanda was the most Christianized nation in Africa, with the highest rate of both conversions and church attendance. It was the poster child of missions success, until in the span of 100 days, two warring tribes turned on each other and began butchering men, women, children…estimates ranging from between 500,000 to 800,000 dead. I’m into politics because the American south was filled with people who were the Klan’s hate on Saturday night, hanging African Americans from trees and torching their houses, while worshipping Jesus on Sunday. I’m into politics because abortion in America is holocaust too.

    On the other hand, I’m not “into politics” at all, because I don’t think the Christian can subscribe to any political party, thinking salvation will reside there. Instead, the Christian is called to thoroughly understand what the coming reign of Christ will look like and, even though he/she understands that our works will never bring about the reign of Christ, live in this present moment as a light of hope, a picture of what the coming reign of Christ will look like – thus would should be ‘into’ standing against all reigns of terror, all racisim, all greed, all systems that rob from the poor and enslave children, and yes, even question systems that pollute the earth (because we’re called to be stewards)

    that’s why I care about these things…and yes, the apostles to do make a big deal about political issues – Paul was killed for refusing to idolize the state.

    • Linda

      All these people doing these horrible things, people like Nazis, communists, KKK, abortionists need Christ. They do these horrible things because they do not know Christ. You can try to get laws changed to make them conform somewhat, but they will still go to Hell if they do not repent and trust in Christ Christ is the solution.

      The churches in Germany during the Holocoust were full of goats pretending to be sheep. That goes the same with churches in America today, all because of the watered down gospel that pastors are preaching, an easy believism gospel, just say a prayer with no repentance gospel. So the real solution is for preachers to preach the real gospel, and people will be saved and whole nations will be changed.

      • raincitypastor

        I must say that Hitler wasn’t threatened at all by the Pietists who were content to keep preaching salvation, as long as they remained complicit with his plans to overrun Europe. Some of the pastors who didn’t like Dietrich Bonhoeffer and other members of the ‘confessing church’ thought exactly as you do, that we should simply keep preaching the message of salvation, but not get into ‘politics’. Most of those who lived through the hell of those years came to regret their ‘privatized’ faith, repenting of limiting the scope of their message.

        For myself, I choose to align with Bonhoeffer, believing the he aligned himself more fully with Christ in that he publicly declared the gospel demands our resistance to policies that are contrary to God’s reign.

      • Glenda

        Linda, what about those who carried out these atrocities in the name of Christ?

      • Dan

        Glenda,

        Whatever people do “in the name of Christ” doesn’t make those actions Christian. If Ted Bundy killed in the name of Christ, he obviously would not qualify as a true confessing Christian.

      • Glenda

        Is it not God who judges between what is and what is not Christian? While it’s easy to spot those things which are obviously not in line with the heart of God (ie. dehumanizing and violent acts like rape, murder, etc.) it becomes far less easy to discern when it comes to the more covert atrocities, those that don’t always flower into violence (racism, classism, sexism, etc.). Many of these are carried out by “true confessing Christians”, many of whom we would gladly pass the plate to and stand alongside for a good hymn-sing. How many true confessing Christians do you know who would say that it’s not only correct but righteous to discriminate against homosexuals?

      • Dan

        Hopefully no “real” professing Christian would say that it’s not only correct but righteous to discriminate against homosexuals. But I don’t know the “quality” of everyone’s faith.

        Yes Glenda, God does decide about what is and is not Christian. People are known by their fruits, correct? And I think the Bible makes it pretty clear what a Christian looks like. And part of what a Christian looks like is a completely unworthy sinner who needs to repent and be sanctified by Christ daily.

        If you mean by “discriminating” against homosexuals that someone is treating them any differently than any other person (in a negative way) than of course that person is not practicing Christian charity. But if it’s discriminatory to show a homosexual what the Bible says about their way of life (in a loving way) and try to help turn them away from that life, then I guess a lot of professing Christians would be guilty. There is a night and day difference bewteen the two, however.

      • Glenda

        Do we have so malleable an identity that we can simply write people out of our history if they behave in a fashion that we deem to be reprehensible? Let’s face it, Dan, there are people who read the same bible as you and I, believe in and worship the same God, but who go about being servants of the Kingdom–in the name of Christ–through ways and means that we would find disgusting. And they’re Christians, if only by virtue of the fact that they claim that identity. The bible can spell out what it means to be a Christian all it wants, but the sheer plurality of denominations within the Christian church gives clear testimony to the fact that our bible is read in many different ways by many different eyes; all of them Christian. Just look to our brothers and sisters in Christ at the Westboro Baptist Church…

      • Dan

        Disagree Glenda. I believe the pastor of Westboro is knocking on the doors of hell, because he obviously understands nothing of Christ. It’s not completely what he or any other Christian says about Christ. It is about what Christ says about you. (Election it’s called).

        A profession with the mouth with no reception in the heart is worthless, and NOT Christian. That’s the problem with the church. The modern (un-reformed, confessionless) church is full of people who walked up to the front to “Just as I Am” at a Billy Graham crusade and were told to utter “these” words and you’re IN. Yay for you for saying the sentence. Now go about your lives. That is heresy.

        I am saying all of this, mind you, as a very unworthy and sinful person. This morning, I coincidentally sent the following paragraph to a friend of mine, because I fear for his soul. It’s by J.I. Packer. I pasted the link to the whole article, which isn’t too long, but it is a must read in the context of what we are talking about.

        Packer: The pastoral effect of this teaching can only be to produce what the Puritans called “Gospel hypocrites”—persons who have been told that they are Christians, eternally secure, because they believe that Christ died for them, when their hearts are unchanged and they have no personal commitment to Christ at all. I know this, for I was just such a Gospel hypocrite for two years before God mercifully made me aware of my unconverted state. If I seem harsh in my critique of Hodges’ redefinition of faith as barren intellectual formalism, you must remember that once I almost lost my soul through assuming what Hodges teaches, and a burned child always thereafter dreads the fire.

        I hope you read the complete article: http://www.fpcjackson.org/resources/apologetics/Modern%20Unbib%20Chall%20to%20Covt%20Theology/packer_lordship_controversy.htm

      • Glenda

        I think we are coming at this from different angles, Dan; you seem to be coming at the definition of Christian from God’s perspective while I’m trying to emphasize the social and political dimension of Christian identity. My immediate concern is not so much what Christ says about me than it is what the world says about me as a manifestation of Christ. This sort of ties into RD’s most recent post, and about people’s perceptions of the church; for those outside looking in, there is no way to distinguish between those that claim Christ. For the watching world–the world that we desire to reach–those at Westboro Baptist are our kith and kin, regardless of what we might say otherwise. You and I can construct our own religious identities in any way that we say fit, but by choosing the mantle of “Christian” we stand in solidarity–either willing or unwilling–with every other human abomination that ever carried out horrors in the name of Christ.

        Besides, though I may cringe at the ways in which they live out their faith, can I really say that those at Westboro Baptist don’t love Christ? I certainly don’t understand their means or their motives, but that doesn’t mean that they are not seeking after God. As convinced as I may be that they are missing the mark by a wide margin, I can’t say that they’re not driven by the same need for God that drives me. Like you said, we are all “completely unworthy [sinners] who needs to repent and be sanctified by Christ daily.”

      • Dan

        Yeah Glenda, we are definitley coming at this from different angles. Although I agree with Richard and you, that we have to conduct ourselves in ways that don’t turn the world away from Christ, my primary concern is what God thinks of me, not the world. In fact Jesus said we would be hated because of Him. Obviously many Christians have been martyred for Him. And of course they weren’t martyred because they were presenting a “palatable” gospel that people looked at and felt good about. They were killed because of what Jesus–and they–were saying and doing.

        I’m a Calvinist, and I have a lot of friends on the other side of that debate that HATE what I think. Oh well, I think what I think is Biblical, so that is all I care about. There is even a tiny bit of a rift in my family about my thoughts…but so be it.

        So this line from your post I just can’t agree with:

        “My immediate concern is not so much what Christ says about me than it is what the world says about me as a manifestation of Christ”.

        My only concern, really, is what Christ says about me. And if I am doing what Christ did I will be killed. But I will also help change the world a little bit in the process, and enter into my real, heavenly home. I pray that I will be told “well done, good and faithful servant”. I shudder at the idea of being told “you sure did an admirable job trying to make me look good; now depart from me, for I never knew you”.

      • Dan

        Glenda,
        To respond to the second paragrah in your last post I would say who cares if someone is seeking after God if that seeking is after the wrong God? Mormons are seeking after God, and they say Jesus all the time in their churches, but they aren’t worshiping the Jesus of the Bible, so they, tragically, are misled and, I believe, hellbound.

        Same with the people who feel they are hearing God’s word at Westboro, while the preacher is leading the charge in Jesus name to go out and picket “the fags” and scream at them that they are going to hell. They obviously don’t see the planks in their own eyes, so they are practicing a false gospel (in my humble opinion).

        Saying “Jesus” when you pray, but the Jesus you’re praying to isn’t the real Jesus, is a prayer that is going nowhere. Might as well pray to David Koresh or Jim Jones.

      • Glenda

        Obviously, Dan, but does the aching and longing for God that rests in the heart of all humanity not draw those of other faiths as well? It is ignorant in the utmost to assume that people of other faiths believe as they do out of any other motivation. Who cares if they’re seeking after the wrong God? I do, for they are my brothers and sisters by virtue of our shared humanity. Feel free to condemn Mormons to hell if you like (and Jews, and Muslims, and Hindus while we’re at it), but don’t say that their seeking after God is worthless; leave such judgement to the Almighty. They may be wallowing with the pigs now, but the desire of every prodigal is to return home.

      • Dan

        “Who cares if they’re seeking after the wrong God”?

        I’ve nothing else to say.

      • Dan

        of course I always have one more thing to say. I’m not condemning people to Hell Glenda. God is. The God of the Bible that demands your worship of the TRUE HIM. Anyhting less is what damns you to hell. We all have our weak attempts at worship, but if you are worshiping a Mormon Jesus, it’s the wrong one. As are many others, such as Joel Osteen’s Jesus.

      • Glenda

        We’ve pretty much left the tracks at this point, but I will say that my question was rhetorical.

      • Dan

        Agreed. There’s been a derailment.

  • raincitypastor

    I’m into politics Linda, because the church in Germany wasn’t ‘into politics’ and so watched while six million Jews were put in gas ovens, as they continued to go to church every Sunday. I’m into politics because Rwanda was the most Christianized nation in Africa, with the highest rate of both conversions and church attendance. It was the poster child of missions success, until in the span of 100 days, two warring tribes turned on each other and began butchering men, women, children…estimates ranging from between 500,000 to 800,000 dead. I’m into politics because the American south was filled with people who were the Klan’s hate on Saturday night, hanging African Americans from trees and torching their houses, while worshipping Jesus on Sunday. I’m into politics because abortion in America is holocaust too.

    On the other hand, I’m not “into politics” at all, because I don’t think the Christian can subscribe to any political party, thinking salvation will reside there. Instead, the Christian is called to thoroughly understand what the coming reign of Christ will look like and, even though he/she understands that our works will never bring about the reign of Christ, live in this present moment as a light of hope, a picture of what the coming reign of Christ will look like – thus would should be ‘into’ standing against all reigns of terror, all racisim, all greed, all systems that rob from the poor and enslave children, and yes, even question systems that pollute the earth (because we’re called to be stewards)

    that’s why I care about these things…and yes, the apostles to do make a big deal about political issues – Paul was killed for refusing to idolize the state.

    • Linda

      All these people doing these horrible things, people like Nazis, communists, KKK, abortionists need Christ. They do these horrible things because they do not know Christ. You can try to get laws changed to make them conform somewhat, but they will still go to Hell if they do not repent and trust in Christ Christ is the solution.

      The churches in Germany during the Holocoust were full of goats pretending to be sheep. That goes the same with churches in America today, all because of the watered down gospel that pastors are preaching, an easy believism gospel, just say a prayer with no repentance gospel. So the real solution is for preachers to preach the real gospel, and people will be saved and whole nations will be changed.

      • Glenda

        Linda, what about those who carried out these atrocities in the name of Christ?

      • Glenda

        Is it not God who judges between what is and what is not Christian? While it’s easy to spot those things which are obviously not in line with the heart of God (ie. dehumanizing and violent acts like rape, murder, etc.) it becomes far less easy to discern when it comes to the more covert atrocities, those that don’t always flower into violence (racism, classism, sexism, etc.). Many of these are carried out by “true confessing Christians”, many of whom we would gladly pass the plate to and stand alongside for a good hymn-sing. How many true confessing Christians do you know who would say that it’s not only correct but righteous to discriminate against homosexuals?

      • Glenda

        Do we have so malleable an identity that we can simply write people out of our history if they behave in a fashion that we deem to be reprehensible? Let’s face it, Dan, there are people who read the same bible as you and I, believe in and worship the same God, but who go about being servants of the Kingdom–in the name of Christ–through ways and means that we would find disgusting. And they’re Christians, if only by virtue of the fact that they claim that identity. The bible can spell out what it means to be a Christian all it wants, but the sheer plurality of denominations within the Christian church gives clear testimony to the fact that our bible is read in many different ways by many different eyes; all of them Christian. Just look to our brothers and sisters in Christ at the Westboro Baptist Church…

      • Glenda

        I think we are coming at this from different angles, Dan; you seem to be coming at the definition of Christian from God’s perspective while I’m trying to emphasize the social and political dimension of Christian identity. My immediate concern is not so much what Christ says about me than it is what the world says about me as a manifestation of Christ. This sort of ties into RD’s most recent post, and about people’s perceptions of the church; for those outside looking in, there is no way to distinguish between those that claim Christ. For the watching world–the world that we desire to reach–those at Westboro Baptist are our kith and kin, regardless of what we might say otherwise. You and I can construct our own religious identities in any way that we say fit, but by choosing the mantle of “Christian” we stand in solidarity–either willing or unwilling–with every other human abomination that ever carried out horrors in the name of Christ.

        Besides, though I may cringe at the ways in which they live out their faith, can I really say that those at Westboro Baptist don’t love Christ? I certainly don’t understand their means or their motives, but that doesn’t mean that they are not seeking after God. As convinced as I may be that they are missing the mark by a wide margin, I can’t say that they’re not driven by the same need for God that drives me. Like you said, we are all “completely unworthy [sinners] who needs to repent and be sanctified by Christ daily.”

      • Dan

        Glenda,
        To respond to the second paragrah in your last post I would say who cares if someone is seeking after God if that seeking is after the wrong God? Mormons are seeking after God, and they say Jesus all the time in their churches, but they aren’t worshiping the Jesus of the Bible, so they, tragically, are misled and, I believe, hellbound.

        Same with the people who feel they are hearing God’s word at Westboro, while the preacher is leading the charge in Jesus name to go out and picket “the fags” and scream at them that they are going to hell. They obviously don’t see the planks in their own eyes, so they are practicing a false gospel (in my humble opinion).

        Saying “Jesus” when you pray, but the Jesus you’re praying to isn’t the real Jesus, is a prayer that is going nowhere. Might as well pray to David Koresh or Jim Jones.

      • Dan

        “Who cares if they’re seeking after the wrong God”?

        I’ve nothing else to say.

      • Glenda

        We’ve pretty much left the tracks at this point, but I will say that my question was rhetorical.

  • Dan

    here here Richard.

    • patricknygren

      hear, hear, indeed.

      • Josh A.

        Hear, hear, hear!

  • Hannah

    Genda and Dan, maybe you should just ask God to start posting instead of trying to talk for him. Who knows, he might show up!

    • Dan

      Hannah,

      You’re right. Christians shouldn’t blog or talk about anything/or have any ideas or conversations. I’ll just ring up God and tell Him to log on. All the “posts” we need from God are in the Bible, which is what Glenda and I were talking about. But according to you I guess we should just shut up and hug and get along. No room for discussion about what God says in Christendom? That’s why the church is dying in America. It’s weak.

  • Hannah

    Genda and Dan, maybe you should just ask God to start posting instead of trying to talk for him. Who knows, he might show up!

  • Hannah

    Dan, yea i think it would be a great idea if we just shut up and hug and get along. I think the world would be a better place if all of the “Christians” would shut up and start hugging people that did not know Jesus. I am pretty sure Jesus wanted us to go and make disciples not go and talk/blog about making disciples :) Of course saying this I am aware that I am currently talking about it, ahhh i love irony.

  • Hannah

    Dan, yea i think it would be a great idea if we just shut up and hug and get along. I think the world would be a better place if all of the “Christians” would shut up and start hugging people that did not know Jesus. I am pretty sure Jesus wanted us to go and make disciples not go and talk/blog about making disciples :) Of course saying this I am aware that I am currently talking about it, ahhh i love irony.

  • patricknygren

    hear, hear, indeed.


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