Soldiers forced to attend candlelight prayer for suicide prevention

Approximately 800 U.S. soldiers were ordered to participate in a candlelight prayer ceremony, and ‘spiritual fitness’ training for a recent suicide prevention campaign. The soldiers are assigned to Fort Sam Houston’s 264th Medical Battalion, responsible for training soldiers in their medical career after graduating boot camp.

It happened last Wednesday (Sep. 26th) and was documented by Victoria Gettman, an instructor at the schoolhouse. She is a fellow foxhole atheist, and among the bravest that have written to me for help. Gettman described her experience to me. She stressed that she did not speak on behalf of the DoD, though she is a Staff Sergeant in the US Army.

candle prayer for suicide prevention

This is wrong on so many levels.

ATTN: Justin Griffith – Military Director of American Atheists

I am an instructor at Fort Sam Houston, TX. I am assigned to Alpha Company in the 264th Battalion. Bravo Company was also in attendance. We instruct students that have just graduated basic training and it is our responsibility to train them for the job they will have in the Army.

This morning my unit had to attend a suicide prevention brief. We were attending the training in a movie theater to accommodate all of us. The suicide awareness and prevention training was an hour long.

Directly following that training, we had a 45 minute training in master resiliency. This training includes spiritual fitness. Immediately following that training, we received about a 15 minute brief from the chaplain. The master resiliency trainer had mentioned he would be followed by the chaplain. When the chaplain entered, I removed myself and stood in the doorway. Plastic candles were handed out. I was giving the chaplain the benefit of the doubt. His first few statements included having something bigger than yourself in your life and NEEDING something divine. I immediately turned around and stood by the front door of the theater. From there I could hear the mass prayer as they turned on the candles, shut off the lights and bowed their heads. The chaplain prayed to his heavenly father.

The students were not given an opportunity to remove themselves. The entire theater was forced into a mass christian prayer. There could have been a break and those that did not want to pray could have remained in the lobby with me or in a formation outside.

Very respectfully,

Victoria Gettman

As the Military Director of American Atheists, I receive a lot of pleas for help. This is one of the most jaw-dropping and blatant violations I’ve seen in a very long time.

There was no opt-out for the students, despite the fact that several of the soldiers identify as non-religious, or as adherents of religions that don’t pray. The action violates several military regulations (AR 600-20 Equal Opportunity, as well as AR 165-1 section 1-6, among many others), as well as constitutional law.

Fix this, now.

Leadership should investigate the incident, reprimand and punish those responsible for the incident, and institute corrective training for everybody who neglected to realize this was unethical and illegal. Furthermore, an immediate public statement acknowledging the incident, and an apology to all of the soldiers involved would be an easy first step towards mitigating the damage already done.

It is hoped that commanders understand that Gettman is not motivated to ‘give the unit/Army a black eye’. The Army deserves the opportunity to become a better Army by correcting its mistakes. It’s honorable to take the ‘hard right’ rather than the ‘easy wrong’. Gettman has whistle-blower protections that are built into the regulations, but it is painfully obvious that regulations are not always followed. Leaders should make a special effort to protect her career from any backlash.

Apart from the looming ethical concerns, I have no idea how much these plastic candles cost taxpayers. Maybe $5-10,000? Perhaps that’s not much, but letting this go on would cost Americans a lot more by setting a dangerous precedent. I urge all of you to speak out!

How you can help

Do you have thirty seconds to spare? Painless ways to support Victoria are below the fold.

This is another one of those times where foxhole atheists need you to speak out for them. With the help of public pressure, I’ve already gotten the Army to order all commanders to stop mandatory online spiritual fitness training. It’s time for the ban to be extended to offline situations too. Honestly, they need to scrap the whole spiritual fitness and the related ‘Master Resilience Trainer’ concept – they’re notoriously unpopular and demonstrably ineffective. Look at the data!

Reporters at the local San Antonio Express did not return the messages I left with the intern that answers their phones. Perhaps you will have better luck.

San Antonio Express

Email- Newsroom

Editor: Mike Leary

Phone: 210-250-3171

Let me know if you hear anything, I can get any reporters in touch with Victoria Gettman, who has already taken the plunge and been cleared for media interaction. Thank you for caring.

Readers should note that most of the Christians I talked to were also dismayed by the situation. Gettman and I both work closely with religious people on a daily basis, potentially in life-or-death situations at some point in our careers. She specifically empathized with her soldiers who are of minority faiths, with no way out of the room. This suicide prevention stand-down was part of a national effort, and it was done correctly at other bases. This is an instance of abuse that all Americans can stand against, including Christians.

Please spread the word. This deserves national media attention, but grassroots is what we depend on – use those sharing buttons for great justice!

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About Justin Griffith
  • http://www.facebook.com/darsmith1 sc_f4dc61f24d38471e53c9c1f0f4a8b28f

    I was the Operations Officer and HQ Commander when Academy Battalion became the 264th six years ago. I remember the only IG complaint I ever got involved a Chaplain event. We didn’t make it mandatory, but everyone had to show up for formation and then those who didn’t want to participate could leave. Though that initially seemed fair, it unnecessarily singled out the non-Christians and atheists. The complaint was valid and we fixed it. I’m not sure in this case that allowing soldiers to leave the theater would work. Better to just not have similar events in the future. Part of the temptation to include the chaplain in events is that chaplains have access to a separate pool of money that can only be tapped if there is a spiritual element to the event. Even I stretched the rules from time to time so we could get “free” food at an event that was otherwise not related to the chaplain.

    • Justin Griffith

      Better to just not have similar events in the future.

      Totally agreed. I disagree with the compromise she suggested, but appreciate the middleground effort and attitude.

      Part of the temptation to include the chaplain in events is that chaplains have access to a separate pool of money that can only be tapped if there is a spiritual element to the event. Even I stretched the rules from time to time so we could get “free” food at an event that was otherwise not related to the chaplain.

      Extremely enlightening. I never thought about it like that. There’s gotta be another way to access NAF or other funding, though!

    • Ryan Jean

      “Part of the temptation to include the chaplain in events is that chaplains have access to a separate pool of money that can only be tapped if there is a spiritual element to the event.”

      This is actually a major reason behind the push for acceptance of Humanists as Lay Leaders (as Justin once tried and as myself and MAJ Bradley are still attempting), the main difference being that as a Lay Leader we would be accessing the resources on behalf of a specified group, Humanists, as opposed to the generic context you cite.

      I have been tempted myself when in leadership positions to flex in order to tap into those resources, but have always had the luck of other resources being available that I could switch to. I did get shoehorned into one at the last second once, where I worked with a Family Readiness Group to sponsor an event, only to have them request chaplain support without telling me.

    • steve84

      If anything it should be opt-in. I don’t necessarily think such events are wrong per se. But why not just say “If you want to participate be at building 5 at 15:00″? That’s how events are organized all the time. It’s planned, people get told a time and place and then they show up. No reason that can’t work in the military as well.

  • blake page

    This sort of thing happens about monthly, if not more, at West Point…every time we have a dinner with a guest speaker we’re asked to “bow our heads in prayer” to somebody’s heavenly father. There’s no option to leave, and there’s very little question as to which god they want us to pray to.

    • Someon

      You pray to whomever you look up to– if you don’t have a “higher entity” then DON’T PRAY! sing the alphabet in your head, recite the 7X tables, practice french in your head for a two minutes— is it REALLY THAT HARD to NOT pray? Seriously? I’m so sick of everyone “offending’ someone– LIVE WITH IT! MOVE ON! I just left the center of the universe and all these mamby pambys are NO WHERE TO BE FOUND! There are 7.5 BILLION people on this planet and there are 7.5 BILLION points of view– How DARE anyone say someone else has to be like them. Who died and left YOU boss? If I were in that theatre, I’d be RESPECTFUL of everyone ELSE’S RIGHT to PRAY in this FREE COUNTRY bound by the FIRST AMMENDMENT because I don’t think GIVING two minutes of my day is NOT GOING TO KILL ME! GROW UP PEOPLE! Rant done……….

      • Justin Griffith

        Someon’s an idiot

      • captainahags

        The only people demanding that everyone be like them are the ones demanding that we take time to pray to (presumably their) god, whether or not we believe. What gives you the right to demand two minutes of my day for your prayer? What makes you think all the people at these events can’t go home and pray all they want without foisting it on me? You have a poor understanding of the first amendment, among other things.

      • M, Supreme Anarch of the Queer Illuminati

        …so when the speaker commands that everyone bow their heads as a symbol of their submission to Thrice-Great Satan, to whom the souls of all those present are committed…that’s perfectly OK? After all, the speaker isn’t requiring people’s thoughts to conform to their outward profession of faith.

      • Zinc Avenger (Sarcasm Tags 3.0 Compliant)

        Your creative use of capitals suggests you are one of those who would splutter with fury at the thought of the same event being held with prayers explicitly in Allah’s name.

      • http://www.facebook.com/agnon.mema agnonmema

        Now go tell a Christian to do that every time a Pagan prayer is initiated at any Military event…….

        • Justin Griffith

          I’ve never heard of Pagan prayer being initiated at any military event (unless you consider a small pagan-only, and entirely optional event a ‘military event’). I’d have the same problem if it was any religion for mandatory events.

      • Dairy

        Seriously. These guys are supposed to be soldiers, but they’re so precious that sitting in a room while other people pray is “wrong on so many levels”, is “jaw-dropping”, and “an instance of abuse that all Americans can stand against, including Christians.”

      • Dairy

        “Someon’s an idiot” – Yep, that’s probably right too though. Calm down man.

        “Now go tell a Christian to do that every time a Pagan prayer is initiated at any Military event…….” – Yes! Do. What are they? Incapable of sitting still for a bit while stuff they’re not participating in happens? Tell them to grow up and stop being anti-pagan and anti-(non-Christian) bigots. Ditto the atheists who do the same as them.

  • http://freethoughtflorida.com robert a. senatore

    I was under the impression that this type of coercive activity had been banned! These morons continue to force our men/women in uniform to “pray”?????

    Why aren’t these fools summarily dismissed???

    • Dairy

      Because no one was forced to pray?

  • http://www.facebook.com/hawk.silverthorn hawksilverthorn

    E-mails sent. This is illegal, immoral and a violation of the U.S. Constitution!

  • http://www.facebook.com/john.mckay.18659 johnmckay

    There is a valid way that the chaplain could have participated in the event. That would have been to give a presentation explaining the resources and services that the chaplains offer and how those might be used to help religious soldiers.

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  • Give me a Break

    I am Pagan and think these things have all gotten out of hand. Yes this country was founded on FREEDOM OF RELIGION, but where is the tollerance to everyone else. Everywhere you turn some Christian is trying to push their views down your throat, and I don’t believe in half the stuff that comes out of their mouths. Money is all most of these people want which is my main point. IT ALL LEADS TO HOW MUCH YOU PUT IN.

  • Nick

    This was a pretty standard thing during my time in the Army. However, whenever I tried bringing it up to either my chain of command or fellow soldiers who were not atheist, I was immediately given a rant on how I need to be more tolerant of their religious preferences, and I don’t have to pray, I can just sit there quietly.

    To me, this hasn’t even become an issue of policy, it’s an issue of indoctrination. So many people are taught by their parents, pastors, priests, and other religious/ key figures in their lives that anyone who doesn’t believe their particular version of religion is going to hell, they feel morally obligated to include those of us in order to “save our souls” or some such. While most were good people and had good intentions, it did tick those of us who did not share their faith off that we were forced into this on so many occasions.

    I think that as part of the Equal Opportunity training for higher ups and Chaplains and the like, it should be stressed a little more that non theists and those who follow religions that may not be a majority in the army need to be given the opportunity to leave any event during any prayer service, or excluded from them entirely if possible and necessary (such as change of command/ responsibility where soldiers leaving and reentering the ceremony would take away from the importance and professionalism of the event).

  • Cuttlefish

    Nick, if I could modify one thing… I would love to hear of a gathering where “any of you who wish to pray right now, we are giving you the opportunity to leave, so you may go do so.” The remainder can start their meals while they’re still hot.

  • Anonymous Atheist

    Cuttlefish – That would be a refreshing change.

    Price check on LED taper candles: best price I saw is 2-packs for $5.50 in orders of 48+ (96+ candles). Plus 2 AAA batteries each, not included.

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  • Thom R

    I just left Ft Sam back in July. I had been there nearly a year at NMTC. Very embarrassed to hear this sort of proselytizing taking place. Suicide prevent is a big deal and trivializing those efforts with mass prayer and spiritual revivals only further isolates non-religious service members. I haven’t heard if Navy were also required to participate in anything but the emails we received here at NMCSD were vague.

  • are you stupid or just a liberal

    You have to be kidding me! You morons signed your life away to protect your country at the starting price of a measley 20 grand if your lucky and your not gonna complain about the estimated 19000 military rapes or or the quagmire that’s bleeding our country dry or our ignorance towards Syria’s violence , instead you complain about the happenings of a somber suici,de awareness/ training program y

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  • Factman

    Interesting discussion… our military is founded on a faith based orientation…is someone trying to change that to?

    The Oath of Enlistment and Officer’s Oath of Office that every respective military member takes before joining the US Armed Forces states…

    The wordings of the current oath of enlistment and oath for commissioned officers are as follows:

    “I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.” (Title 10, US Code; Act of 5 May 1960 replacing the wording first adopted in 1789, with amendment effective 5 October 1962).

    “I, _____ (SSAN), having been appointed an officer in the Army of the United States, as indicated above in the grade of _____ do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God.” (DA Form 71, 1 August 1959, for officers.)

    http://www.history.army.mil/html/faq/oaths.html

    • Justin Griffith

      Enlisted and Officers certainly can and have requested an affirmation rather than a swearing. Officers can also cross out the last bit (and initial it) in their official commissioning papers.

      Also, here’s a link to AR 601-280 “The Army Retention Program,”… look at appendix D Paragraph 2k

      “Oath of enlistment/reenlistment. Verify with soldier to determine if he or she prefers to “swear” or “affirm.” The phrase, “so help me God” may be deleted for soldiers electing to “affirm.” For soldiers electing to “affirm,” prepare a 3- by 5-inch card, editing the oath, for use by the administering officer”

      Still skeptical? Here is a full-bird colonel chaplain doing MY oath without ‘so help me god’… this is one rank below Brigadier General and only a handful of chaplains outrank him.

      How about you never say this shit again? Glad we had this chat.

      • Factman

        Really glad that you have done your homework, kudos to you. No real need to take a defensive tone. Just the fact that the phrase “So help me God” is omitted and not added validates the my initial statement. Keep up your movement, this is a free country.

    • http://www.facebook.com/agnon.mema agnonmema

      Interesting, extremely interesting. Just when was the requirement that the words “So help me God” implemented — because when I signed on with the USAF in the 1980s there was no such requirement at all.

  • Are you kidding me?

    I was in attendance that morning. I am also an instructor in the same unit and was more than happy to sit in that auditorium with my fellow Soldiers and receive a briefing on a matter that has been plaguing our organization for many years.

    The loss of a Soldier, for any reason, is one the most difficult experiences that any leader is going to face in their military career. When that loss is preventable, the sense of loss is even greater.

    The Army has been under siege of late from the media outlets in regards to the rising population of successful suicides. The Army has taken steps to raise awareness and hopefully reduce the amount of suicide within its ranks. Will this stop all suicides? No. But when the training that takes place can possibly lead to the saving of at least one life, then the time, money, and effort used to raise awareness is more than well spent.

    I did see some posts on the disparity between the training/monetary expenditure on rape/sexual assault and suicide. Perhaps the prevalence of suicide in some commands are not as high, or perhaps it’s the idea that a loss of life is somehow more significant than a rape or sexual assault. I am not saying that either one is fact, but merely used as an example in order to suggest to you that there are more variables to this than what so few might chance to understand or believe. I, sadly, do not have an answer as to why that is, but this is a topic for another discussion entirely.

    A topic that is included in the resiliency training does have a focus on spirituality. That is true. I think what my battle buddy, SSG Gettman, fails to understand is that the basic principles of Resiliency Training is not something that our military came up with out of thin air. Master Resiliency Training (or MRT) is based upon the idea that the Army finds that Soldiers are able to rebound from the trials of adversity, and not fall into the pits of despair, if they are more well-rounded in a number of key areas. Those areas are based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and also incorporates C. Robert Cloninger’s addition of the idea of self-transcendence which is sometimes identified as a form of spirituality.

    The idea of self-transcendence is that you think of yourself as part of the universe. You are the part of a greater machine. That you are important and matter to others. (This begins to sound a lot like what you might want to tell someone that might be considering suicide and it is something that we try to tell our Soldiers at every turn.) The fact is, as Soldiers, we are part of a team and what we do matters to others. If you are able to attach yourself to a higher purpose, be it your family, your team, your unit, your friends, or even your religion then one of your basic needs will be fulfilled. If you know that you are part of something greater than yourself then there is sometimes a sense of accomplishment in what you help your organization achieve.

    What I can tell you is this. I am not a Christian. Yes. I, like many of you, was brought up in a Christian home, and still hold many Christian values. Treat others how you would like to be treated. Take the high road or turn the other cheek. I wouldn’t label myself as Atheist. I am agnostic. I have adopted a belief that it is better to live and let live. I have no true faith in a higher power, but I am a fervent believer in the fact that there is a higher purpose. I have faith in my family, faith in my Army, and faith in my country. But I also have faith in humanity.

    I would like to believe that Atheists would value life above many things as they, and I, believe that death is the end of all things. I would also like to believe people would not go so far as to say that one person or belief is above any one other person or belief.

    What transpired in that theater may not have been explained to the fullest by SSG Gettman. It is often easy to take things out of context with an email and a picture. I can assure you that prayers do happen frequently in the military. When your line of work typically involves the possibility of loss of life, very many turn to their respective faiths for comfort and guidance. I respect that fact. Others turn to their families, friends, teams, or units. That is more than worthy of respect too.

    The chaplain corps is not meant to sling religion around, but to be an avenue of counseling and support to all Soldiers. When a chaplain is at a function, he/she is going to pray with everyone (as the majority of Soldiers in the formation pray, too). The chaplain is going to pray for the safety of all Service Members, dead and living, and the families of those Service Members. I must echo what a few others are saying. If you are in the formation and the formation is praying, but you do not want to…

    Don’t.

    Do what I do. Hope. I hope that nobody else will commit this senseless act. I hope that every Soldier will be able to come home to their children one day. I hope that my family and friends stay well. Do I believe that my hoping will help or change anything? Not a chance. But does it hurt?

    I also hope that SSG Gettman reads this. I hope that she realizes that she is foolish for making a mountain out of a molehill. I hope that she understands that there are better ways to improve the organization from within, rather than trying to tear it down from without. I would also like to remind her of her NCO Creed. While I am proud that she has the moral courage to stand up for what she believes is right, I question her motives and her tact in doing so.

    Before I hit submit, I would like to ask you all to do me a favor. Call me what you will, but please don’t call me anything that will question my honor or duty to this country.

    I thank you for your time, and I look forward to any discussion that you might also have on the topic.

    • Justin Griffith

      First off, I’m a soldier too, so it’s a bit odd that you’d assume that I’d question your honor… That won’t be happening here.

      Are you aware that the suicide prevention day took place on every base? Fort Sam Houston is the only base where a candlelit prayer was part of the mandatory training. Did you not care that this violated several regulations, including chaplain regulations, as linked above (AR 165-1)?

      A topic that is included in the resiliency training does have a focus on spirituality. That is true. I think what my battle buddy, SSG Gettman, fails to understand is that the basic principles of Resiliency Training is not something that our military came up with out of thin air. Master Resiliency Training (or MRT) is based upon the idea that the Army finds that Soldiers are able to rebound from the trials of adversity, and not fall into the pits of despair, if they are more well-rounded in a number of key areas. Those areas are based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and also incorporates C. Robert Cloninger’s addition of the idea of self-transcendence which is sometimes identified as a form of spirituality.

      The idea of self-transcendence is that you think of yourself as part of the universe. You are the part of a greater machine. That you are important and matter to others. (This begins to sound a lot like what you might want to tell someone that might be considering suicide and it is something that we try to tell our Soldiers at every turn.) The fact is, as Soldiers, we are part of a team and what we do matters to others. If you are able to attach yourself to a higher purpose, be it your family, your team, your unit, your friends, or even your religion then one of your basic needs will be fulfilled. If you know that you are part of something greater than yourself then there is sometimes a sense of accomplishment in what you help your organization achieve.

      This idea of ‘spirituality’ is roughly equivalent to the less controversial ‘medical’ definition, which was indeed cited by the U-Penn authors. They cited ‘Spirituality’ as one out of 27 aspects of their ‘positive happiness’ concept – the ‘think positive = good life’ strategy that is increasingly unpopular in medical circles (outside of U-Penn). The Army took this concept of Spirituality and handed it over to the chaplains… completely misunderstanding the connotative difference between the medical definition and the theological definition!

      In the FOIA we request we unearthed emails where their own JAG lawyers told them they couldn’t make it mandatory – because it’s unconstitutional. The chaplain in charge of the Spiritual portion of MRT / GAT / SFT (all rolled up in the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness organization), then replied to the JAG lawyer with a sarcastic: “That sounds like ‘legal advice’ not ‘an order’… I non-concur.” Everything a JAG says is legal advice! E.g. they can’t ‘order’ you to plea guilty, etc…

      Look at section 3B of this ALARACT that I fought for. The ‘online’ spiritual fitness training can no longer be mandatory. This is from Feb 2011, right before MRT started in full. It needs to be applied to offline Spiritual fitness training too… so that MRT’s like yourself don’t set the US Army up for lawsuits (one-inch putt of a law suit, at that).

      Now ask yourself… if the Army *really* thought that ‘Spiritual Fitness’ was entirely religion-free, and more ‘medical’ in its definition of ‘spiritual’… why did they make it optional, but the rest mandatory? If it was based solely on medical data (which I’d argue could easily be done), this whole discussion would be a red-herring.

      Instead it looks more like this.

      Check out the INSANE ‘virtual spiritual fitness center.’

      Is this the ‘medical’ definition at play?

      And lastly… while you were in the audience, did you see any Muslims face towards mecca while they prayed? Did they set their candles down as they pulled out a smart phone to properly orient themselves? Did you see any Buddhists pray (because they don’t do that…)? Did you see any Wiccans wince because they don’t have a ‘heavenly father’? There is NO such thing as ‘nonsectarian prayer’. This is ‘Christian privilege’ on the part of the chaplain. It doesn’t matter if he left off ‘Jesus’, it’s still the Christian method of prayer. You can’t mandate it!

      • Teresa Feliciano

        I participated in Suicide Prevention Stand Down at Fort Knox and we did not have any type of a mandatory prayer vigil.

        I became a Christian when I found absolutely no hope in anything else. I know what it feels like to think about ending it all. If not for the hope I have in God I may not be here. I propose that if faith (Christian or otherwise) saves the life of just one Soldier by offering a message of hope, is it not worth it?

        • Justin Griffith

          What about soldiers who reject faith? Don’t we deserve:

          A) not to be slapped in the face with mandatory bible thumps and candlelight prayers

          B) suicide prevention that is tailored to us too? Or alternatively, secular suicide prevention training that is universal to all soldiers

          C) medical approach to a medical problem (depression, anxiety, PTSD, etc.)

          Look, you can have your plastic candle jesus chants. Just don’t force the muslims, jews, wiccans, and atheists to attend. How? Make it completely and undeniably optional.

    • Bruce Gorton

      To add to what Justin is saying, there is a fair degree of risk that in promoting specific theological outlooks (as that prayer does) leads to the increased marginalisation of religious minorities.

      Particularly as this is often taken as an excuse to harass secular members of the armed forces.

      The likes of Christian Fighter Pilot, a bigot who is noted for slandering junior military personnel who cannot in fact respond for fear of being accused of insubordination, demonstrate that evangelical Christians in particular are prone to abusing religious minorities.

      As military service is a particularly stressful field of endeavour, this means that by forcing attendance at such events, the military likely actually increases the risk of suicide amongst its members.

      It produces the image that not only are Christian Fighter Pilot and his ilk supported by military command, but endorsed by the higher ups.

      While it is important that this sort of “training” is a complete violation of the constitution, it is also important to note that it actually has the opposite effect to what is intended. In other words, it is likely one of the reasons why suicide now outpaces war deaths amongst US service members.

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  • grammasheila

    If you can’t put aside your personal prejudices and care for your patient, don’t go into any medical field.

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/rockbeyondbelief/ Justin Griffith

      Go to bed, gramma. LOL stop kicking anthills.


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