Pope Francis’ First Audience and Missing the Point

Two things.

First, Pope Francis’ remarks at today’s audience are simply remarkable and in perfect step with the early weeks of his pontificate. Here is an excerpt:

Jesus lived the daily realities of most ordinary people: He was moved by the crowd that seemed like a flock without a shepherd, and He cried in front of the suffering of Martha and Mary on the death of their brother Lazarus; He called a tax collector to be His disciple and also suffered the betrayal of a friend. In Christ, God has given us the assurance that He is with us, in our midst. “Foxes”, Jesus said, “have dens and birds of the sky have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to rest His head” (Mt 8:20). Jesus did not have a home because His house is the people — that is, us; His mission is to open all God’s doors, to be the loving presence of God.

Read it all here, in English — y aquí en Español.

It is also remarkable to see the present pulse of the Vatican as compared to the US political scene.

Secondly, Elizabeth Scalia (our fearless leader at Patheos Catholic) has written a brilliant and feisty essay on how the secular press and the Catholic insiders are getting things wrong about Pope Francis. She writes,

Practically from the moment he appeared on the balcony of St. Peter’s, gazing with remarkable placidity upon the throng before him, it has been clear that this pope is a spiritual brawler — to the world, a quiet menace, because a spiritual brawler will smile and offer you nothing but ferocious tenderness, the kind that will impact, repeatedly, on the solar plexus, until we are breathless and ready for mercy. The world needs precisely this sort of pummeling — anything besides tenderness, and its guard would be forever up. As I have said before, everyone in turn, and in varying measures, is going to find something to love about Francis and something to be bugged by; we’re all going to be challenged out of our comfort zones.
As Pope Francis put it today:
…living Holy Week following Jesus means learning how to come out of ourselves – as I said on Sunday – to reach out to others, to go to the outskirts of existence, to be the first to move towards our brothers and sisters, especially those who are most distant, those who are forgotten, those who are most in need of understanding, consolation and help.
Looks like I’ve got a lot of work to do.
  • Victor

    Hey! That’s a good start “MAN”!

    Keep “IT” UP!
    By The Way, please pray for me too.

    Peace


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