The Art of Blogging No. 4: An Interview with Calah Alexander

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 Calah Alexander was born and raised in Bedford, TX; she blogs at Barefoot and Pregnant. Her style of blogging is subtle: At first glance, she appears to be a mommy blogger, and would be the first to agree with this classification. But in her posts, and this interview process, she reveals a confessional motivation that is driven by a sharp, critical, and searching mind accompanied by a full and generous heart. Her story of life and faith are tightly woven together, and appear here in some … [Read more...]

Pewsitter: Brilliant Irony or Self-Parody?

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I had never visited Pewsitter* before, and had only heard of it, in online passing, until about ten minutes ago. I don't know about their history or mission of anyone (that I know of) who writes or works there. My sense, prima facie, is that much like The Vortex is made in the image of the O'Reilly Factor, Pewsitter is an imagus Drudge. So be it. My comparison here is simply that: a one to one comparison.*Recently Simcha Fisher posted a fiery post, critical of Pewsitter's phrasing in a … [Read more...]

“The incendiary scene reminded me of Nativist mobs” — Dolan on the Dignity of Immigrants

Yesterday, Timothy Cardinal Dolan posted a brief note at his site where he unambiguously reprimands those treating immigrants with hostility and scorn.A week or so ago, I watched with shame as an angry mob in southern California surrounded buses filled with frightened, hungry, homeless immigrants, shaking fists, and shouting for them to “get out!”It was un-American; it was un-biblical; it was inhumane.  It worked, as the scared drivers turned the buses around and sought sanctuary else … [Read more...]

Benedict XVI vs. Francis: The Great Papal Football Finale

A day after the Germans blitzed their Brazilian hosts 7-1, the Argentines have outlasted the Dutch in penalty kicks. This sets the stage for Sunday, where Germany will face Argentina, in the World Cup final, a clash that surely will be of interest to the Vatican, for obvious reasons. I'll be rooting for the Americans to hoist the cup.Not only do we live in the a time of two living popes: We now also witness, for first time in world history, two popes who will surely be rooting for their … [Read more...]

A Christian Case Against the Literal Reading of Scripture

If being a Christian is to be a follower of Jesus Christ, then it follows to think that Christians ought to be like Christ.In many cases this might prove difficult. We do not know everything Christ did on Earth in the finest detail. In other cases, when overextended, this would be silly. It would be outrageous to say (as some people sometimes imply) that women cannot be Christians, because Jesus Christ was a man.Here we see that even when trying to be a Christ follower it is crucial not … [Read more...]

A House is Not a Home: Domestic Church and the Art of Homemaking

This is part of the Patheos Catholic summer symposium, anticipating the Church's "Synod for the Family" in October.*I write surrounded. By boxes. We are moving into our new place in Vancouver, British Columbia. This is the 14th move of my 31 years of life, excluding small and transitional moves.I have now been a resident in three countries: the USA, Mexico, and Canada.There is a process of thinking and way of being, an attitude and approach about the place where one lives, that … [Read more...]

The July Experiment

During the month of July I will try to blog more and less: I will try to blog more frequently, perhaps even posting several posts in a day, but I will limit my posts to five-hundred words or less --- which is significantly less than the usual fare. (Yesterday's post doesn't count because I starting writing it in the wee hours of June.) If this "works" (whatever that means), I may halve the word count for August.The reasons behind this experiment are many, and teasing them all out would be … [Read more...]

One Question Answered (and Raised Again) by SCOTUS

I love reading Supreme Court decisions and dissents. They are without rival in US public discourse. Even though the court is polarized in many ways, even their predictable decisions must come with reasons. Good reasons, bad reasons, odd reasons, but reasons nonetheless. That alone makes these things an all-too-rare treat.The headlines and spectacles of coverage mostly miss the ways that these decisions not only set legal precedents, but also (and many times more importantly) advance public … [Read more...]

Agonism, Antagonism, and Attitudes About Certainty

I think PEG really hit one nail on the head in his last post of our ongoing discussion on education. He understands, and sympathizes, that social scientific research used to bolster policy and curriculum for schooling today is, mostly, garbage. This fact, he rightly intuits, forces me into a defensive attitude about any unqualified appeal to science. He goes on to present his most careful and thorough to date explanation of what he means by 'science' and shows that there is a tradition of … [Read more...]

Against Best Practices and Unintentional Philistinism

PEG has penned another fine rejoinder to my last, rather tedious, reply. I appreciate his patience and willingness to add details and nuance that, in many cases, have convinced me that my initial critique was, in some ways, unwarranted or aimed at the wrong side of the argument.For instance, I am no longer concerned about PEG’s insistence on method. He has swayed me with his appeal to holism. I would only add the following: holism as a method is not what many methodologists means by the term … [Read more...]


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