Deschooling Religious Ed

The ideological assumption that 'schooling' and 'education' are synonyms, that they both describe the same exact thing, has sunk so deeply into our collective consciousness, that it is at this point ubiquitous. Common sense has gone insane.Homeschooling, for the most part, is nothing more than schooling in a home. The kitchen table replaces the desk, but the textbook and the formulaic curricula remain.So much of the dreary  institutionalization that measures-out time into Mondays, … [Read more...]

Something Remarkable in Steubenville

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I attended Franciscan University of Steubenville from 2001 to 2005; I used to play music most Thursday nights in the back room of the The Spot Bar, to a group of students. The "townies" stayed at the front end of the bar, segregated by class, custom, and self-importance. We shared the gross bathrooms. A stinky solidarity.I played two benefit concerts for The Harmonium Project this past October and, in the process, I got to know the core group of young visionaries working there. I saw their … [Read more...]

Indiana Teacher of the Year Reviews the Primer UPDATED

Steve Perkins is the 2014 teacher of the year for the state of Indiana. This accolade is most impressive to me because he teaches Latin. The very concept that a classicist can be honored in the present regime of schooling is a surprise and a sign of hope and promise.He came across my book, A Primer for Philosophy and Education, at First Things, in Stephen Webb's theological review, and has begun writing a series about it at his blog. Like all good book reviews, he adds to the book itself and … [Read more...]

The Educational Significance of Advent

Liturgy is mystogogical. In other words, one role of liturgy is to teach and form the faithful, to catechize us both in and out of formal liturgical events. If our home is a "domestic church," then it should look, sound, and feel like a church, especially if we live with children. Why? Because churches are decorated and arranged for more than ornamental purposes. The pictures, colors, structure, style, and order of a church are all deeply catechetical. The images teach and show. The form of the … [Read more...]

Excellent Review of My “Primer” at First Things

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Stephen Webb's column at First Things today --- titled "Sam Rocha’s Strange and Startling Philosophy of Education" --- gives a generous (and even foreboding) theological review of my book, A Primer for Philosophy and Education. Webb writes:A Primer for Philosophy and Education, his brief introduction to the philosophy of education, is proof that educational heresy is what you get when you begin with theological orthodoxy. (Theology is a science, and education an art, but most educators get t … [Read more...]

Why I’m Not Too Worked Up About Common Core

The history of compulsory schooling in the United States resembles the political history of Latin America, only its successes are fewer and shorter-lived. It is replete with failure, reform, reform of the reform, and more failed reform.From the Common School Movement in the 1830's, founded by Horace Mann, to the Common Core of today, there are identical language and themes along with unrealized and misguided aspirations throughout.If you look at the reforms stretching from National D … [Read more...]

Discussion on the Mount?

Over at First Thoughts, there is a post titled, "The Lecture Works, and It Always Has." Although it oversimplifies the issue, it does a good job of bluntly stating the obvious fact that there is something about the art of lecturing that will not soon go away.I think lectures will endure in human life --- they are highly effective ways of communicating, and can be quite beautiful and transformative --- but they may be banned from many of our colleges and universities someday. There are many … [Read more...]

Lessons from a Veteran, Teacher

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National holidays tend to bring out the most annoying personality traits of the mirror-imaged two sides --- the liberals and the conservatives --- that clutter the public discourse of this country. Sadly, I have a tendency to get caught up in that song and dance, too. But this misses the real opportunity that any holiday brings: a chance to recall stories, lives, and lessons, rooted in the person, not the ideological accoutrements. HERE IS A SHORT STORY AND TRIBUTE about my Tio Meme, Manuel R … [Read more...]

Boredom is Laziness

We live in a culture of boredom. It may seem odd that, within the most overstimulated society in human history, there is such rampant boredom, but I am not sure that this is quite as odd as it seems. These apparent --- and delightful --- contradictions are riddled across the flux of  life, in all of its forms.The real question is simpler and more direct. What is boredom and what can be done about it?Here is the situation: My two sons are generally occupied without interruption, but they … [Read more...]

Update: Thank You, Fall Schedule, Books, and Album

It's been just over a year now that I've been blogging at Patheos. That year has coincided with our relocation to North Dakota. The winters here are long and brutal. Without Patheos --- you the readers, and the beautiful motley crew of writers at the Catholic Channel, Los Patheosi --- I don't know what I would've done.Thank you.I should especially thank Elizabeth Scalia, who gave me my shot and who puts up with my antics and promotes my stuff.*This Fall will be my busiest to date … [Read more...]


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