Deschooling Religious Education, in Six Claims

1. Compulsory schooling came to the United States in the 18th century, during the Whig "common school movement," built on the Prussian model that was founded after the advent of the Prussian research university. The first compulsory schooling laws were passed in the late 1850's, in New Hampshire and New York. A lot of that movement was motivated by a defensive belief that parents could not be trusted to raise their children. This is where the legal concept of in loco parentis came from.2. … [Read more...]

Deschooling Religious Ed

The ideological assumption that 'schooling' and 'education' are synonyms, that they both describe the same exact thing, has sunk so deeply into our collective consciousness, that it is at this point ubiquitous. Common sense has gone insane.Homeschooling, for the most part, is nothing more than schooling in a home. The kitchen table replaces the desk, but the textbook and the formulaic curricula remain.So much of the dreary  institutionalization that measures-out time into Mondays, … [Read more...]

Reality and the Virtual: Relativity is not Relativism

My previous post on relativism has been mostly well received, to my great surprise. It has also been critiqued in some very useful and important ways, in comments and elsewhere. I am not going to try and write a direct response here; the comment box was actually quite useful and I don't care to add the complexity of rejoinders to what was already a long and tedious post.The most unexpected non-reply was from the great fighters of relativism, the culture warriors, who probably didn't have … [Read more...]

The Splenda of Truth: Remarks on Relativism

Those who are greatly upset by, and concerned about, relativism usually say that they are principally concerned about the truth. If this is the case — if indeed the ultimate aim is to defend the truth — then it would make sense to be upfront and honest about the truth of what relativism is and is not. Otherwise, there is something amiss and asymmetrical about the whole situation.Sadly, this messy lack of symmetry is where I see things today in discussions amongst anti-relativists. In fact, on … [Read more...]

Accessible Augustine: Beauty Ancient and New

I apologize for my infrequent blogging this month. Between travels, the flu, and some other work, I've been unable to write. In the meantime, here is the video of a talk I gave at St. William Catholic Church in Round Rock, Texas, on December 14th, 2013. The talk is a general introduction to Augustine's Confessions.  … [Read more...]

Thoughts on Phil Robertson and Duck Dynasty

I like to watch TV, which is why I don't own one. Plus, I watch plenty of television shows online, so having a television would at this point interfere with my television watching. Needless to say, I've never watched a full Duck Dynasty episode, although some snippets here and there, a quick Google search, and not living under a rock give me a decent general impression.I started watching Survivor this past year and really like it. I also like Project Runway, although I was recently put off … [Read more...]

Fear, Jealousy, and Paranoia: We Love to Wrestle

There can be good clean fun in the political give and take. The sport of politics can be as enjoyable as any other hobby, snack, or professional wrestling. Debate is fun for some of us, and the pleasure we take is in the debate itself, not the issues. I'd rather be interesting than right, sometimes.So I have a hard time taking an absolute position against politics in toto. Politics can be okay. It depends.But these days things are not so innocent and it seems to be getting worse. A lot … [Read more...]

The Harmonium Project Must Fail

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The Harmonium Project is the name given to a group of students at Franciscan University of Steubenville (FUS) who have made a radical choice. They've decided to live in Steubenville, OH, not by chance, force, or unfortunate accident, they have decided live in a run-down, smoggy, depressed and dirty town that they could just as easily ignore from their privileged perch on a hill that preserves the University from the streets and the people of town.Frannies vs. Townies.These students see … [Read more...]

¡No le aflojes! (from Things and Stuff)

(My first book of essays — Things and Stuff — was published in 2011 as something of an experiment. The result was, in many ways, premature. This past weekend, at a talk I gave at St. William Catholic Church in Round Rock, Texas, I looked at it again and was surprised by its appeal. I think it outsold my Primer. Here is an essay from the collection that, in many ways, paved the way for the the Primer that I dedicated to my late Abuelito Rocha. I wrote this the day after he passed away.)¡No l … [Read more...]

Indiana Teacher of the Year Reviews the Primer UPDATED

Steve Perkins is the 2014 teacher of the year for the state of Indiana. This accolade is most impressive to me because he teaches Latin. The very concept that a classicist can be honored in the present regime of schooling is a surprise and a sign of hope and promise.He came across my book, A Primer for Philosophy and Education, at First Things, in Stephen Webb's theological review, and has begun writing a series about it at his blog. Like all good book reviews, he adds to the book itself and … [Read more...]


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