Mercy for Gosnell, For Us All

I tend to ramble and write down all the details, leaving them fussily thrown about, in piles and pieces and mess, for you to make sense of. A lot of that is by choice, trying to copycat this or that brilliant writer who has true randomness in her prose, a trait that I fiercely envy. But some of it is just the way this stuff comes out. Editing is tough work, mainly because there is a lot of stuff that, even though it's not perfect, it is as good as it will get.On Friday I felt the way I tend … [Read more...]

Beyond Abortion: Gosnell and a New Dark Age

My sister delivered a healthy baby boy the day before yesterday. When I called to congratulate her, I asked to be spared from the details. When my wife gave birth to our second son, I was the one about pass out during the epidural.This past November, when I saw the headlines about Savita, I tried to ignore it because I have no stomach for delivery room gore. When I did read the stories a day later, my response was angry and indignant. I was pissed. Pissed, but hopeful. I thought we could … [Read more...]

Immigration Seen Through Catholic, Pastoral Eyes

No one, I think, wants to read a blog by a Texican all about present-day, US immigration debates. Too predictable, right?Not quite.Although I was born in a bordertown (Brownsville, Texas), I do not come from immigrant ancestors, in the recent immediate sense of the issue. My maternal and paternal Hispanic families pre-date the United States' aquisition of the southwest. To borrow Gloria Anzaldúa's expression: the border crossed us, literally.Nonetheless, the issue of immigration … [Read more...]

“Google Nose” Smells Funny and Familiar: A Sun Blemish

People got offended by Google's choice to feature a sketch of Cesar Chavez today, Easter Sunday. I have very little to say that First Things editor, Matthew Schmitz, didn't cover in his excellent and timely blog post, "Why It's Fitting to Remember Cesar Chavez on Easter Sunday."Those who remain unconvinced, should read "The Passion of Cesar Chavez," published in Crisis Magazine almost a year ago.The lesson is this: if there is an opportunity to proclaim the Gospel, then doing otherwise i … [Read more...]

Pope Francis’ First Audience and Missing the Point

Two things.First, Pope Francis' remarks at today's audience are simply remarkable and in perfect step with the early weeks of his pontificate. Here is an excerpt: Jesus lived the daily realities of most ordinary people: He was moved by the crowd that seemed like a flock without a shepherd, and He cried in front of the suffering of Martha and Mary on the death of their brother Lazarus; He called a tax collector to be His disciple and also suffered the betrayal of a friend. In Christ, God has … [Read more...]

A Hot Mess: Marriage, Derrida, Nabokov, and Whatnot

images

I don't really understand what the same sex marriage hullabaloo is about. I can understand it at a personal, anecdotal level. I know a great many people who are upset and concerned and animated about this issue. But I do not have a clear grasp of what is really going on.As a Roman Catholic, I understand marriage as a sacrament. I'm not even sure what it means to be "married" outside of the sacrament of marriage. I guess filing taxes is the only place where it makes some concrete sense to … [Read more...]

Pope Francis, Our American Pope

I just arrived in Portland, Oregon. It was a long, beautiful train ride. My pope alarm was rendered useless by rural Montana, but I eventually got the word, narrated over the phone by my wife. Since then, I've consumed news in the patches of 3G service available.Needless to say, I'm not very well informed. But I do hope to read some of his works in Spanish and provide some commentary in the months to come, before the translations begin to pour out. As usual, this isn't journalism. Just … [Read more...]

Papal Indifference and The Will of God at the Bowling Alley

285310_153155001509485_2000548605_n

I don't care who our next pope will be. I find the fanfare understandable and laudable at times, but mostly lackluster. Even slightly annoying. I think a Patheos blogger already wrote about that.Here and there, in conversations I've had lately, I've mentioned that globalizing the papacy makes me uneasy. I think I prefer Italian popes. But I really don't care. I suspect that comment is just to make conversation interesting.I've even found myself indifferent to the papacy in general. I … [Read more...]

Economics Makes Us Crazy

I have no misgivings about, nor apologies for, my near total ignorance of economics. I don't know the special terms nor do I possess insight or erudition about its governing concepts and intellectual history. Sure, I've read a thing or two. But nothing technical. In the very little I have read, especially around election time, I get the impression that the application of econometrics to business and politics are, more often than not, inexact or flat out wrong.Economics as we (don't) know it, … [Read more...]

Benedict XVI: A Portrait of Humility

I was a senior at Franciscan University of Steubenville when Pope John Paul II died. It is hard to describe the rich melancholy that hung in the air that day. The anxiety and uncertainty. The sorrow. We, the students, had only known one pope for our entire lives. It was a sad, disorienting day.We should have seen it coming, and of course we did. Everyone did. I recall the indignation I felt when the media, and sometimes other Catholics, would call for him to resign because of his poor … [Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X