Class Notes

“Foundations of Educational Thought” — second meeting The most important thing that happened in class yesterday did not occur in the time/space of the class. About two hours before class I was busy sorting through a reimbursement snafu where I completely lost my composure. I was seething mad. In retrospect I am pretty happy that I didn’t do anything REALLY stupid given how internally angry, how royally pissed off, I was.  Prior to that I prepped a pretty good class … [Read more...]

Happy Feast of St. Monica!

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A Perverse Chapter on Zizek and Education

I’ve recently been invited to write a chapter in a book on Slavoj Zizek and Education. I know some of you who visit here are Zizek nerds like me, so I figured I’d share it for that reason. The title is “The Fantastic Emergence of Narrative: Educational Fantasies in Zizek’s Atheistic Theology.” For the rest, I present it as an exercise in self-humiliation. It is a perverse proposal, and will be a perverse chapter, in the sense that it is built with outrageously specialized … [Read more...]

Class Notes

I like the idea of keeping this log about my teaching. It will also give the curious souls in my classes ways to get indirect feedback about what we just experienced, from my point of view. Last night my “Historical Foundations of Education” class met from 7 to 10 pm. Amazingly enough, we didn’t take a formal break. But we did take time to read and be quiet. I lectured and did board-work for at least half of the time. As a change of pace, I had them read drafts of my … [Read more...]

Latest Article: Who Gets to Be a Philosopher?

The Ohio Valley Philosophy of Education Society puts together a fine peer-reviewed journal each year, featuring the best work from their annual conference. This year’s issue is dedicated to the theme of “immortal conversations,” and it produced some interesting and good work. Eduardo Duarte’s poetic piece — “Retrieving Immortal Questions, Initiating Immortal Conversations” — is fantastic, especially as it trans-forms into poetry. Bryan Warnick, my … [Read more...]

Class Notes

I taught my first class at the University of North Dakota yesterday: “Foundations of Educational Thought.” These graduate courses meet once a week and go just shy of three hours. I tend to scoff at the idea of “running out stuff to talk about,” but I did learn that there is a certain mental fatigue that sets in around hour two. I plan on watching very long movies (like Into Great Silence) to try and condition myself and learn the art of sustaining attention. I suppose certain liturgical rituals w … [Read more...]

Bus Tour Results

I’m returning from my three-day bus tour today. As critical as I tend to be, I found something here, in this rural, humble state, that I needed to rediscover: humility, hard work, hope, and real joy. I met politicians, real politicians, who melted some of my cynical assumptions about the efficacy of politics. I met administrators who have begun to change my rather defensive posture towards institutional life. I saw real people, people who treated me with dignity and respect, but also a … [Read more...]

Reservation Talk

Greetings from North Dakota! I’m on my second day of a triduum bus tour of the state, sponsored by the University of North Dakota. This morning we visited Sitting Bull College and heard lectures about the college, the Dakota and Lakota nations, and the life of Sitting Bull.One of the great blessings of my Latino ethnic heritage is that I do not suffer from white guilt, nor do I have to apologize about it. (To hear my thoughts about whiteness, race, and identity see my talk, “White H … [Read more...]

Update: Primer, Syllabi, and Deleted Cigarettes

It’s been a busy few days of writing and course prepping. I finished the first draft of A Primer for Philosophy and Education and would be happy to share a digital copy with those interested in it. (Just send me an e-mail.) Course syllabi are just about finished for my upcoming classes at the University of North Dakota: “Foundations of Educational Thought” and “Historical Foundations of Education.” Finally, I deleted my essay “In Praise of Cigarettes” … [Read more...]

Mysterium: building Catholic culture through the arts

During the Fall of 2004, I played a small coffeshop gig at Franciscan University: my opening act was the newly-arrived freshman singer-songwriter, Kevin Heider. He was good. Real good. Fresh, witty, but not annoying. Not the usual guy-with-a-guitar-and-a-song fare. Now, with some friends, he’s up to some great work with Mysterium, a collective of Catholic artists. I just supported their Kickstarter project for their new live studio album — The Glory Collective, Shine — and you … [Read more...]


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