Riders of the Purple Sage

Review of Riders of the Purple Sage by Zane Grey By ALEXIS NEAL Young, beautiful Jane Withersteen seems to have it made.  She owns several thousand head of cattle, a powerful lot of land, the fastest, most beautiful pair of black racehorses in the state, and the only spring for miles around.  But trouble is looking for [Read More...]

Free of Charge

Review of Free of Charge: Giving and Forgiving in a Culture Stripped of Grace by Miroslav Volf By JUSTIN HAWKINS The greatest cause for joy in the life of the Christian is the fact that God has forgiven the presumably indelible stain of his depravity. It follows, then, that the Christian’s forgiveness of others ought [Read More...]

When Religion Goes Bad, Turn to Paul

Review of Bad Religion by Ross Douthat By CHRISTIAN HAMAKER Yes, that’s the Apostle Paul referred to in the title. I can already hear the objections. “No! When religion goes ‘bad,’ turn to Jesus!” “Turn to God!” or even “Turn to the Bible!” There’s nothing wrong with any of those approaches, except that none of [Read More...]

Tehanu

Review of Tehanu by Ursula Le Guin By COYLE NEAL I think that Ursula Le Guin must be a desperately unhappy person. Not only is she one of the few female science fiction/fantasy writers out there (I want to say she was the only one when she started, but that might be a lie), but [Read More...]

The Philosophy of Murder

Review of Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky By PAUL D. MILLER Crime and Punishment may be the most theologically explicit and ambitious novel ever written.  It attempts nothing less than the conviction of nihilism and postmodernism for the sins latent within them, and the conversion of their adherents to Christianity.  The books follows a [Read More...]

Night Watch

Review of Night Watch by Sergei Lukyanenko By ALEXIS NEAL Years before emotionally stunted vampires first sparkled in idyllic mountain meadows, bloodthirsty creatures of the night stalked the streets of Moscow in search of human prey—and they are not the only ones.  To the vampires, shape shifters, and dark sorcerers of the world, humans are [Read More...]

The Age of Innocence

Review of The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton By PAUL D. MILLER Why does Newland Archer walk away? That is the parting question of this powerful story. This novel is a fascinating and minute observation of broken relationships, the power of convention, and the tempting pull of vain dreams. It is almost mournful and [Read More...]

Lit!

Review of Lit!: A Christian Guide to Reading Books by Tony Reinke By ALEXIS NEAL Fact: I love to read.  I like books.  I even like books about books.  So when I heard that there was a new book on the market, a Christian book about books and reading, I was pretty stoked.  And when, [Read More...]

The Battle for America’s Soul in American Gods

Review of American Gods by Neil Gaiman By JULIA POLESE Neil Gaiman’s American Gods hit all the right buttons. Gaiman himself described it as an “American phantasmagoria,” an extraordinarily apt descriptor (See the interview with Gaiman in the 10th anniversary edition). It’s a fantasy novel with deep philosophical underpinnings, a healthy dollop of whimsy, and [Read More...]

Huck Finn – When Great Books Were Fun

Review of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain By PAUL D. MILLER Great books are great because of their depth and because of how they teach great truths about human life.  But because most great books are very old, they require the reader to do some heavy lifting to get to the good [Read More...]


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