The Age of Innocence

Review of The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton By PAUL D. MILLER Why does Newland Archer walk away? That is the parting question of this powerful story. This novel is a fascinating and minute observation of broken relationships, the power of convention, and the tempting pull of vain dreams. It is almost mournful and [Read More...]

Lit!

Review of Lit!: A Christian Guide to Reading Books by Tony Reinke By ALEXIS NEAL Fact: I love to read.  I like books.  I even like books about books.  So when I heard that there was a new book on the market, a Christian book about books and reading, I was pretty stoked.  And when, [Read More...]

The Battle for America’s Soul in American Gods

Review of American Gods by Neil Gaiman By JULIA POLESE Neil Gaiman’s American Gods hit all the right buttons. Gaiman himself described it as an “American phantasmagoria,” an extraordinarily apt descriptor (See the interview with Gaiman in the 10th anniversary edition). It’s a fantasy novel with deep philosophical underpinnings, a healthy dollop of whimsy, and [Read More...]

Huck Finn – When Great Books Were Fun

Review of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain By PAUL D. MILLER Great books are great because of their depth and because of how they teach great truths about human life.  But because most great books are very old, they require the reader to do some heavy lifting to get to the good [Read More...]

The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook

Review of The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook: Slaying the Living Dead Within by Jeff Kinley By ALEXIS NEAL Coyle Neal recently discussed the relationship of zombie myths to Christianity. In The Christian Zombie Killer’s Handbook, I encountered another intersection between Christianity and everyone’s favorite mindless monster. The book is, sad to say, a rather meandering, [Read More...]

The Big Sky

Review of The Big Sky by A.B. Guthrie, Jr. By COYLE NEAL The Big Sky is the story of Boone Caudill, who just wants to be left alone. Left alone by his parents, left alone by society, and left alone by every other human being. So he moves West, where he learns the ways of [Read More...]

Epic Men

Review of The Song of Roland By PAUL D. MILLER The Song of Roland is the medieval French Catholic Crusader abridged version of the Iliad.  It tells the story of the rearguard of Charlemagne’s army, led by the eponymous Roland, fighting against overwhelming numbers at the Battle of Roncesvalles in 778. Imagine the armies of [Read More...]

Velvet Elvis

Review of Velvet Elvis: Repainting the Christian Faith by Rob Bell By ALEXIS NEAL Allow me to start by saying that I have a low tolerance for vaguely deep-sounding statements that don’t actually mean anything.  The word ‘journey’ gives me hives.  I get queasy when I read sentences like ‘Somewhere in you is the you whom [Read More...]

The Banality of Angst

Review of Faith and Other Flat Tires by Andrea Palpant Dilley By COYLE NEAL Another entry into the ever-growing “memoir” category, Andrea Palpant Dilley’s Faith and Other Flat Tires chronicles her journey from being a missionary kid to being a sort-of agnostic back to being some kind of theist. Using Pilgrim’s Progress as a (very) [Read More...]

Wuthering Heights

Review of Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë By PAUL D. MILLER Wuthering Heights was voted Britain’s favorite love story in 2007, according to the Guardian—which is what I hated so intensely about the book. Wuthering Heights is not primarily a love story. The love story is the pretext for a story about addiction, slavery, and revenge. [Read More...]


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