Robinson Crusoe

Review of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe By PAUL D. MILLER I love this book. The practical parts were fun. I loved seeing Crusoe’s inventiveness and industry. I would certainly have perished. After the part about Crusoe domesticating the goats and getting milk, butter, and cheese out of them, I asked Google how to make [Read More...]

What does power reveal? Caro answers.

Review of The Years of Lyndon Johnson (Vol. 1, 2, 3) by Robert A. Caro NOTE: The fourth volume will be reviewed in a future post. By KENDRICK KUO When The Passage of Power hit the shelves in May this year, every major literary magazine, political blog, and newspaper with an opinion column, felt obligated [Read More...]

Inferno

Review of Inferno by  Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle By COYLE NEAL In my college Epic Poetry class, I was given the assignment of writing a new Canto to Dante’s Inferno. I had two ideas that seemed equally appealing, so I stuck them both into my own three-page masterpiece of undergraduate prosy. First, being the [Read More...]

David Copperfield

Review of David Copperfield by Charles Dickens By PAUL D. MILLER “Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anyone else, these pages must show.” I immediately liked the tenor of the book from the first sentence. Dickens is very funny—I loved [Read More...]

The Imitation of Christ

Review of The Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis By ALEXIS NEAL A devotional classic, dating from the 1400s, this book has been published into almost every language, and some argue that it is the most widely read devotional work next to the bible.  The author (generally accepted to be Thomas à Kempis, a 15th Century German monk), [Read More...]

Allison Hewitt is Trapped

Review of Allison Hewitt is Trapped by Madeline Roux By COYLE NEAL “Death and Hades gave up the dead who were in them.” Revelation 20:13 The last zombie book I read left me thinking, “this was great, but what it really needed was a good dose of feminist angst.” Fortunately, I stumbled across Allison Hewitt [Read More...]

The Aeneid

Review of the Aeneid by Virgil By PAUL D. MILLER Reading Homer feels like spending time with a rustic, patched-together story. Homer matches odds and ends of an oral tradition that weaves various memories into a grand story about the olden times of courage and sacrifice. Virgil, by contrast, is a dictator’s propagandist. The Aeneid [Read More...]

Dostoevsky and Sandusky: The Christian Anthropology of The Brothers Karamazov

Review of The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky By JUSTIN HAWKINS “See, this alone I found, that God made man upright, but they have sought out many schemes.” – Ecclesiastes 7:29  “Two extremes, gentlemen of the jury, remember that Karamazov can contemplate two extremes and both at once.” –Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov Reinhold Niebuhr begins his [Read More...]

The Serpent in Eden in Crossing to Safety

Review of Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner By JULIA POLESE Crossing to Safety is Pulitzer Prize-winning author Wallace Stegner’s final novel.  It is a story of two couples coping with the loss of Eden. Told from the perspective of Larry Morgan, the novel begins with he and his wife, Sally, as a young couple living [Read More...]

The Humanity of Christ

Review of The Jesus We Missed: The Surprising Truth About the Humanity of Christ by Patrick Henry Reardon By ALEXIS NEAL This is, or wants to be, a biography of Jesus.  Or at any rate, a biography of his humanity, as it’s far from an exhaustive account of all his activities. Reardon walks through the life of Jesus [Read More...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X