‘Now You See Me’ has no magic

Review of Now You See Me, Directed by Louis Leterrier Now You See Me follows the story of the Four Horsemen (a brand new quartet of illusionists) as they stage three consecutive shows. In their first show in Las Vegas, they steal money from a bank in Paris and shower the crowds with the Euros. [Read More...]

‘Epic’ Community Focuses on Serving, Not Deserving

Review of Epic, Directed by Chris Wedge From Chris Wedge, director of Ice Age, comes Epic, a passable animated feature based on William Joyce’s  The Leaf-Men and the Brave Good Bugs. The plot is … well, kind of complex and hard to summarize. If you don’t care about the plot and just want the review, [Read More...]

Martin Scorsese on Film Preservation and the Future of Movies

Review of Scorsese’s Jefferson Lecture The National Endowment for the Humanities selected filmmaker Martin Scorsese to deliver its 2013 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities, a distinction NEH calls “the highest honor the federal government confers for distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities.” Speaking to an audience at the Kennedy Center in April in Washington, D.C.—and [Read More...]

The Great Gatsby and the Despair of Decadence

Review of The Great Gatsby, Directed by Baz Luhrmann “There is an evil that I have seen under the sun, and it lies heavy on mankind: a man to whom God gives wealth, possessions, and honor, so that he lacks nothing of all he desires, yet God does not give him power to enjoy them…” [Read More...]

Double Indemnity: Bleak Justice in Classic Noir

Review of Double Indemnity, Directed by Billy Wilder Billy Wilder was more than the Steven Spielberg of his era. While Spielberg is one of the most prominent, acclaimed, and decorated directors of all time, Wilder is that and a writer as well. He wrote the screenplays for most of his best movies, including The Apartment (1961), [Read More...]

Star Trek Into Moral Leadership

Review of Star Trek Into Darkness, Directed by J. J. Abrams A confession: I am not a Trekkie. I watched the film as someone with very little education on the Star Trek universe, having only seen Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan, Star Trek: First Contact, and J. J. Abrams’s Star Trek. If you want [Read More...]

Star Trek Into Terror

Review of Star Trek Into Darkness, Directed by J.J. Abrams Star Trek Into Darkness is a thrilling, fun, loud, dazzling movie–a perfect summer popcorn flick.  It is also much more fun if you know absolutely nothing about it before you go.  I have no intention of spoiling that fun for you, which makes it difficult [Read More...]

Gatsby: Tragic Hero of Hope

Review The Great Gatsby, Directed by Baz Luhrmann I rarely disagree with what the internet tells me to think about a movie, but today I do. The critics dislike Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of The Great Gatsby. It has a 45 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes. They are wrong. Gatsby is a fine film. Baz Luhrmann [Read More...]

My Neighbor Totoro

My Neighbor Totoro, by Hayao Miyazaki  My Neighbor Totoro (1988) is a quiet, calm, beautiful film. There is no dialogue for very long stretches of story while characters explore, watch, and discover—akin to the opening sequence of WALL-e. There is no sass talk, there are no quick cuts, no pop-culture references, and no special effects.  [Read More...]

At Any Price: A Study in Discontentment

Review of At Any Price, Directed by Ramin Bahrani Profoundly American and profoundly disturbing, At Any Price, the newest release by acclaimed director Ramin Bahrani (Goodbye Solo, Chop Shop), strikes at the heart of our enterprise and reveals the broken souls drifting along this cycle of greed. The Whipple family is steeped in Iowa’s agriculture [Read More...]


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