Always Online, Ever “Disconnected”

Review of Disconnect, Directed by Henry Alex Rubin Disconnect gives us four stories about people growing estranged from one another and how they reach a breaking point, only to find that reconnection is still possible. The narrative struggles with the growing disconnectedness in an American society awash in social media and communication technologies; and this [Read More...]

Are We All in a Trance?

Review of Trance, Directed by Danny Boyle What is the role of memory in shaping our identity and our motives? This question drives the plot of Trance, Danny Boyle’s (Trainspotting, Slumdog Millionaire) newest film. If you just watch the trailer, you immediately know that the film is not what it seems. There are going to [Read More...]

Terrence Malick’s To the Wonder: A Stunted Scriptural Meditation on Marriage and Ministry

Review of To the Wonder, Directed by Terrence Malick Terrence Malick, the reclusive filmmaker of Badlands, Days of Heaven, and The Thin Red Line, has turned to more explicit religious themes in his most recent films. The Tree of Life, Malick’s 2011 epic, included a long creation sequence and a mystical moment of reunion with deceased loved [Read More...]

42 and Jackie Robinson’s Legacy of Nonviolence

Review of 42, Directed by Brian Helgeland The story of Jackie Robinson is familiar to most Americans, but being an American who grew up overseas, I must confess ignorance of this iconic hero before watching 42. (The educational value of the film itself makes it worth watching: among other things, 42 underlines the exalted position [Read More...]

The Raiders of the Lost Ark Discover That “Our God is a Consuming Fire”

Review of Raiders of the Lost Ark, Directed by Steven Spielberg When I was growing up, I read a lot of The Hardy Boys and The Sugar Creek Gang series, adventure stories in which boys solve mysteries, chase bad guys, rescue strangers, discover mysterious caves, explore abandoned mansions, recover exotic artifacts from far off lands, [Read More...]

End of Watch: A Portrait of Male Friendship

Review of End of Watch, Directed by David Ayer  The first thing I heard about End of Watch was its realistic and moving portrayal of male friendship. I watched the film with that expectation and it did not disappoint. End of Watch follows the patrols of Brian Taylor (Jake Gyllenhaal) and Mike Zavala (Michael Peña), [Read More...]

The Evil Dead: “Please, God: Give Me a Break”

Review of Evil Dead, Directed by Fede Alvarez Some viewers like movies that leave them thinking about themes and ideas for weeks and months after they see them. Others want an experience at the cinema, a couple of hours that make them laugh, cry, scream or jump out of their seats. The pleasures of those [Read More...]

Jurassic Park Is Back and Better Than Ever

Review of Jurassic Park 3D, Directed by Steven Spielberg The year is 1993, and fictional bajillionaire (and genetic engineering tycoon) John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) has finally done the un-doable: he has brought the dinosaurs back to life. Using DNA recovered from prehistoric mosquitoes preserved for millions of years in amber (and supplemented with frog DNA, [Read More...]

Integrity and Fatherhood Beyond the Pines

Review of The Place Beyond the Pines, Directed by Derek Cianfrance Luke Glanton (Ryan Gosling) and Avery Cross (Bradley Cooper) have parallel lives, though on the surface Luke is a criminal and Avery a policeman. Luke and Avery both have a woman and child, their mother-in-law lives with them, and they both are absent fathers. [Read More...]

May the Force Be With You

Review of Star Wars, Directed by George Lucas  If you ask a cinephile what his favorite decade was, chances are he will pick the 1970s.  That decade was full of movies that movie lovers love to love–really dark, gritty, tragic, violent movies like A Clockwork Orange (1971), Mean Streets (1793), Taxi Driver (1976), The Godfather, [Read More...]


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