Twilight: Sucking the Blood out of Sin

A Review of the Twilight franchise by Stephenie Meyer By JENNILEE MILLER I think the term typically used to describe someone like me is “Twi-Mom.” Yes: I am a mom who loves the Twilight franchise. Of course, I think the term originally referred to a mom who picked up her daughter’s glossy paperbacks with the [Read More...]

Hitchcock’s Analysis of Love and Murder

Review of Hitchcock, Directed by Sacha Gervasi By KENDRICK KUO  The opening scene of Hitchcock met with erupting laughter from the theater audience. Ed Gein—the inspiration for the novel Psycho—killed his brother with a shovel to the head in a most comedic way; after which the camera panned to Alfred Hitchcock (Anthony Hopkins) who speaks [Read More...]

Life of Pi’s Aesthetic as Theology

Review of Life of Pi, Directed by Ang Lee By KENDRICK KUO Life of Pi asks big questions but leaves audiences with few answers. This latest Ang Lee movie is an adaptation of the eponymous novel by Yann Martel, which already had a large readership before Lee announced the upcoming film release. Life of Pi [Read More...]

Mad as Hell

Review of Network, Directed by Sidney Lumet Reviewed by PAUL D. MILLER Before Glen Beck and Rush Limbaugh, before Keith Olbermann and Chris Mathews; there was Howard Beale. With astonishing prescience, Network (1976)—the story of an angry-man newscaster—prefigured almost all the tropes about media celebrities four years before CNN, twelve years before Limbaugh, twenty years [Read More...]


A Review of Lincoln, Directed by Steven Spielberg By PAUL D. MILLER There is a scene near the end of Steven Spielberg’s luminescent new film Lincoln in which the President paces the White House alone waiting for news of the House of Representatives’ vote on the 13 Amendment, which will abolish slavery once and for [Read More...]

Skyfall; or Why Some Old Dogs Don’t Need to Learn New Tricks

Review of Skyfall, Directed by Sam Mendes By ALEXIS NEAL M has a problem. Someone has stolen MI6’s list of all NATO agents embedded in terrorist cells around the world. (Obviously this someone was a big fan of Mission: Impossible.) And it would appear the same someone has a personal vendetta against her—someone with a [Read More...]

Justice for Enron

Review of Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Directed by Alex Gibney By KENDRICK KUO Growing up, I heard about the story of Enron, but having lived overseas when the scandal broke out and only being a middle schooler at the time, it didn’t make a big impression on me. But after watching the [Read More...]

Top Train

A review of Unstoppable, Directed by Tony Scott By Paul D. Miller Tony Scott is famous for having made Top Gun (1986), one of the definitive action movies of the 1980s and coolest expressions of American nationalism on film, and for being the brother of Ridley Scott.  Sadly, Tony was in the headlines this summer [Read More...]

Weirdness at its most effective

Review of Cloud Atlas Directed by Tom Tykwer and the Wachowskis By COYLE NEAL Don’t let the title fool you—there is neither cartography nor meteorology in the latest entry in the “I read a philosophy book once” series of films by the Wachowski brothers siblings starship. As with their previous movies, Cloud Atlas contains a [Read More...]

Why We Fight: Searching for Justice in an Unjust World

 A Review of Cloud Atlas, directed by Tom Tykwer and Wachowski Starship By ALEXIS NEAL Every once in a while, you see movies advertised as offering ‘something for everyone,’ and it’s usually just so much marketing malarkey. Cloud Atlas is an exception. This deeply strange film includes: a period adventure on the high seas (complete [Read More...]