Tokyo Loneliness

Review of Tokyo Story, Directed by Yasujiro Ozu By PAUL D. MILLER Roger Ebert recently updated his personal list of the ten best film of all time.  I had seen eight of them and knew of a ninth, but had never even heard of the tenth.  I Googled the mystery film and learned that it is [Read More...]

Hereafter Without Christianity

Review of Hereafter, Directed by Clint Eastwood Review by KENDRICK KUO The very name and premise of Hereafter promise viewers an exploration of the afterlife. Stylistically and in substance, the film fails to do the topic any justice. Hereafter follows three lives—a young boy in Britain who loses his twin brother, a French journalist that [Read More...]

Hondo

Review of Hondo, Directed by Louis L’Amour By COYLE NEAL As I’ve mentioned in an earlier post, Americans are always in search of their own body of myths and legends—a literary past we can look to and claim as our own. The most recognizable and uniquely American body of literature that has grown up as a result [Read More...]

Justice and Terror

Review of Munich, Directed by Steven Spielberg By PAUL D. MILLER Munich (2005) is a sad movie. Unlike Spielberg’s other dramas—Shindler’s List (1993), Amistad (1997), or Saving Private Ryan (1998)—Munich ends without hope, full of questions, under a heart of sorrow. It asks “How do you balance the need to respond to terrorism with the knowledge that the response may [Read More...]

Celebrating Beauty Over Truth

 Review of Mao’s Last Dancer, Directed by Bruce Beresford By KENDRICK KUO I’ve become the resident reviewer of Chinese foreign films and movies about China. And in due course I will also become the reviewer of books about China. Having grown up as an Asian American, let’s say this is a way for me to [Read More...]

The Flowers of War

Review of The Flowers of War, Directed by Zhang Yimou By KENDRICK KUO [Warning: The review below contains mature themes] The Rape of Nanjing is a historical event that continues to play a role in Sino-Japanese relations. Whenever the Japanese government reviews or changes its educational curriculum, its treatment of the sacking of Nanjing (or [Read More...]

The Whisperer in Darkness

Review of The Whisperer in Darkness, Directed by Sean Brannery By COYLE NEAL The writings of H.P. Lovecraft are forgotten gems of American Literature. Despite the best efforts of his fans (including the good folks over at the H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast), Lovecraft remains mostly known by gamers and devotees of alternative metal. So when [Read More...]

The Great Leap Forward to Famine

Review of Mao’s Great Famine, Directed by Patrick Cabouat and Philippe Grangereau (film can be viewed here for free) By KENDRICK KUO In recent years, the famine accompanying Mao Zedong’s Great Leap Forward has achieved the title of “The Great Famine.” Previously, it had been known as the “Three Years of Natural Disasters,” which shifted [Read More...]

Odd Parenting in a Crooked World

Review of The Odd Life of Timothy Green, Directed by Peter Hedges By KENDRICK KUO The odd life of Timothy Green is not the odd part, but rather how he is parented. Odd not in a bad way, but in the way it contrasts with the broad goals of worldly parenting. Cindy and Jim Green [Read More...]

Where’s Mom? Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Nobody Knows

Reivew of Nobody Knows, Directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda By CHRISTIAN HAMAKER There are four of them, plus mom—for a while. She’s just moved the family into a new apartment. The kids love mom, even when she implies they might be to blame for the family’s wanderings. One young child made too much noise at their [Read More...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X