Mad as Hell

Review of Network, Directed by Sidney Lumet Reviewed by PAUL D. MILLER Before Glen Beck and Rush Limbaugh, before Keith Olbermann and Chris Mathews; there was Howard Beale. With astonishing prescience, Network (1976)—the story of an angry-man newscaster—prefigured almost all the tropes about media celebrities four years before CNN, twelve years before Limbaugh, twenty years [Read More...]

Lincoln

A Review of Lincoln, Directed by Steven Spielberg By PAUL D. MILLER There is a scene near the end of Steven Spielberg’s luminescent new film Lincoln in which the President paces the White House alone waiting for news of the House of Representatives’ vote on the 13 Amendment, which will abolish slavery once and for [Read More...]

Skyfall; or Why Some Old Dogs Don’t Need to Learn New Tricks

Review of Skyfall, Directed by Sam Mendes By ALEXIS NEAL M has a problem. Someone has stolen MI6’s list of all NATO agents embedded in terrorist cells around the world. (Obviously this someone was a big fan of Mission: Impossible.) And it would appear the same someone has a personal vendetta against her—someone with a [Read More...]

Justice for Enron

Review of Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Directed by Alex Gibney By KENDRICK KUO Growing up, I heard about the story of Enron, but having lived overseas when the scandal broke out and only being a middle schooler at the time, it didn’t make a big impression on me. But after watching the [Read More...]

Top Train

A review of Unstoppable, Directed by Tony Scott By Paul D. Miller Tony Scott is famous for having made Top Gun (1986), one of the definitive action movies of the 1980s and coolest expressions of American nationalism on film, and for being the brother of Ridley Scott.  Sadly, Tony was in the headlines this summer [Read More...]

Weirdness at its most effective

Review of Cloud Atlas Directed by Tom Tykwer and the Wachowskis By COYLE NEAL Don’t let the title fool you—there is neither cartography nor meteorology in the latest entry in the “I read a philosophy book once” series of films by the Wachowski brothers siblings starship. As with their previous movies, Cloud Atlas contains a [Read More...]

Why We Fight: Searching for Justice in an Unjust World

 A Review of Cloud Atlas, directed by Tom Tykwer and Wachowski Starship By ALEXIS NEAL Every once in a while, you see movies advertised as offering ‘something for everyone,’ and it’s usually just so much marketing malarkey. Cloud Atlas is an exception. This deeply strange film includes: a period adventure on the high seas (complete [Read More...]

When the Legend Becomes Fact…

Review of The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Directed by John Ford By PAUL D. MILLER Here is a movie that just begs to be a Jeopardy question. The category is “Classic Film.” The answers are: “The only movie in which Jimmy Stewart punches John Wayne in the face,” “The second movie in which Jimmy [Read More...]

Why defect to North Korea?

Review of Crossing the Line, Directed by Daniel Gordon and Nicholas Bonner By KENDRICK KUO Crossing the Line is a British documentary about American defectors to North Korea. In 1962, James J. Dresnok, a U.S. Army soldier, defected to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. To my surprise, although the documentary focuses on Dresnok, it [Read More...]

Senna: Racing to the Glory of God

Review of Senna, Directed by Asif Kapadia By CHRISTIAN HAMAKER As a member of the Washington Area Film Critics Association, I’m honored to take part in the group’s year-end awards vote. Between my regular assignments as a film critic for Crosswalk.com, I try to squeeze in as many films as I can in order to [Read More...]


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