One Problem with Swinburne’s Case for God

In The Existence of God (2nd edition, hereafter: EOG), Richard Swinburne lays out a systematic cumulative case for the claim that it is more likely than not that God exists.I have a specific objection to the third argument in this case, but I believe this objection throws a monkey wrench into the works, and creates a serious problem for the case as a whole.To understand my objection, it is important to understand the general logical structure of Swinburne’s case for the existence of God. … [Read more...]

New by Paul Draper: God and the Burden of Proof

See the attachment below."God and the Burden of Proof" by Paul Draper (2014) … [Read more...]

If Theism is True, Why Is There Moral Progress and Not “Moral Prophecies”?

If theism is true, why aren't there "moral prophets" in the sense that they clearly perceive objective moral truths which are ahead of their time, such as someone 2,000 years ago declaring slavery is wrong, misogyny is wrong, etc.? Why do we instead observe moral progress? For example, why did much of humanity, for most of human history, believe that slavery was morally acceptable? What possible moral justification could God have for allowing people, on such a massive scale, to have mistaken mor … [Read more...]

Round Table Discussion on Theism, Naturalism, and Evidence (video)

I join Justin Schieber (of Reasonable Doubts)  and others for a round table discussion on theism, naturalism, and evidence. I defend Draper's argument from moral agency and also an argument from consciousness for theism. … [Read more...]

Sketch of an Argument from Substance Dualism to the Falsity of Classical Theism

LINK … [Read more...]

Index: Larry Arnhart on the Case For (and Against) Life After Death

Part 1: IntroductionPart 2: Near Death ExperiencesPart 3: Kantian DualismPart 4: Neuroscience, Consciousness, and Free WillPart 5: Does Morality Require the Cosmic Justice of Heaven and Hell? … [Read more...]

Perceptronium and Consciousness as a State of Matter

LINK … [Read more...]

Evidential Asymmetry, Scientific Confirmation of Prayer, and Horrific Evils

1. The General CaseOne of the most important (and equally most often forgotten) lessons that Bayes's Theorem can teach us about evidence is that the strength of evidence is a ratio. To be precise, let H1 and H2 be rival explanatory hypotheses, B be the relevant background information, and E be the evidence to be explained. Now consider the following ratio: Pr(E | B & H1) ----------------- Pr(E | B & H2) If Pr(E | B & H1) > Pr(E | B & H2), then this ratio is greater … [Read more...]


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