The Slaughter of the Canaanites – The Grand Inquisitor Jones

"If the facts are against you, argue the law. If the law is against you, argue the facts. If the law and the facts are against you, pound the table and yell like hell." Carl Sandburg, in The People, Yes (1936) One response to my sixty objections against Clay Jones's attempt to defend Jehovah's command to the Israelites to slaughter the Canaanites (men, women, and children), is that my my objections "argue the law" thus betraying a reluctance to "argue the facts", perhaps because the facts tend … [Read more...]

The Irrelevance of Naturalistic Metaethics to Arguments from Evil Against God’s Existence

Consider the following exchange between Christi, a Christian, and Natty, a naturalist, on the problem of evil. Natty: If God exists, then why is there so much evil and suffering in the world?Christi: Well, if God exists, it's logically possible that so much of the evil and suffering in the world is due to the free choices made by humans exercising their free will. At this point, astute readers will notice that Christi has just invoked the Free Will Defense (FWD). Let's continue: Natty: … [Read more...]

The Slaughter of the Canaanites – Part 10

Clay Jones argues that Jehovah commanded the Israelites to slaughter the Canaanites (men, women, and children), but that this command and the obedience of the Israelites to the command was morally justified because the Canaanites deserved the death penalty for various serious crimes or sins which were violations of the laws of Jehovah (see his article “Killing the Canaanites”). Jones provides a list of the crimes or sins allegedly committed by the Canaanites which were (supposedly) deserving of t … [Read more...]

Hypocrisy on Moral Arguments, Arguments from Evil, and Logical Inconsistency

Many theists are fond of linking the problem of evil with a moral argument for God's existence. The idea is that by making an argument from evil against God's existence, the atheist has supposedly contradicted herself since the the argument from evil presupposes an objective evil and objective evil, in turn, presupposes God's existence.Since I've refuted that claim before, I want to explore a different aspect of linking these two kinds of arguments, namely, the double standard which … [Read more...]

Belated Summary of 2013 London Talk, “What Apologists Don’t Want You to Know about God”

In March 2013, I was honored to have the opportunity to speak to the Central London Humanists Group. The title of my talk was, "What Apologists Don't Want You to Know about God."There was no recording of the talk, but I was just made aware that someone in the audience had taken the trouble of writing a pretty decent summary of my talk.LINK … [Read more...]

The Demographics of Evidence About God: A Novel Argument Against Theism

Christian apologist Tom Gilson attempts to turn the tables on proponents of the argument from nonresistant nonbelief (aka the argument from divine hiddenness). According to Gilson, the fact of divine hiddenness is evidence for God's existence. Before I quote Gilson's argument from divine hiddenness to Christian theism, I first need to provide some context.1. Gilson's Defense Against the Argument from Nonresistant NonbeliefIn The Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Religion, the eminent p … [Read more...]

The Slaughter of the Canaanites – Part 9

Clay Jones argues that Jehovah commanded the Israelites to slaughter the Canaanites (men, women, and children), but that this command and the obedience of the Israelites to the command was morally justified because the Canaanites deserved the death penalty for various serious crimes or sins which were violations of the laws of Jehovah (see his article “Killing the Canaanites”). Jones provides a list of the crimes or sins allegedly committed by the Canaanites which were (supposedly) deserving of t … [Read more...]

The Slaughter of the Canaanites – Summary of Objections

Clay Jones argues that Jehovah commanded the Israelites to slaughter the Canaanites (men, women, and children), but that this command and the obedience of the Israelites to the command was morally justified because the Canaanites deserved the death penalty for various serious crimes or sins which were violations of the laws of Jehovah (see his article “Killing the Canaanites”). Jones provides a list of the crimes or sins allegedly committed by the Canaanites which were (supposedly) deserving of t … [Read more...]