Elections, Politics, Consent, and #sexyvoterhaiku

this kiss courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Yesterday was a completely improvisatory performance, unfolding in real time, exploring the metaphor of elections and politics as sexy, as seduction, as the whole damntangle. [Read more...]

Listening Is an Act of Dilation

Inner ear as Yggdrasil. Who knew.

Listening is a creative act. It’s a sacred act, to listen fully to another. We’re co-creative not just with our gods and gardens, but with each other. [Read more...]

“The New Face I Turn Up to You”

P Tasso, Venice labyrinth (wikimedia)

Do we have an ethical responsibility to develop creativity and imagination within ourselves, to encourage it in others? I’m talking about radical engagement. With each other. With life. [Read more...]

“That Which You Hate and Try to Destroy is Sacred”

Hiphopheartland 2013

I want every woman to insist on herself—and to be free and able to do so— whoever she is, intensely and immediately and forever and get to the work she must do in the world, without fear. [Read more...]

Lupercalia

Wolf (photo by Jan Nijendijk)

Whatever the origins and timing of Valentine’s Day, 14 February was originally the date of a very different festival – the festival of Lupercalia. This was a fertility festival honouring the she-wolf who suckled Romulus and Remus. It also honoured Lupercus, god of shepherds. The festivities were presided over by the priesthood of the Luperci, who were dedicated to Faunus. They sacrificed two goats and a dog. There was then a sacrificial feast, and the Luperci cut thongs called februa from the skins of the animals, dressed themselves in the skins of the sacrificed goats, and ran round the walls of the old Palatine city. They struck all those who came near with the thongs. Young women would line up on their route to receive lashes from these whips. This was reputed to ensure fertility, prevent sterility, and ease the pains of childbirth. [Read more...]

The argument from desire

medieval woodcut

The “argument from desire” is that we all have a “God-shaped hole” in consciousness, which can only be filled by the divine. Can this concept have any meaning in a Pagan context? What is it that Pagans desire? For one thing, most Pagans believe that the divine (whether it is perceived as a single underlying energy, or as many deities) is immanent in the world, and therefore available to our experience in the here and now. [Read more...]

Religion and humour

Baubo

Part of the function of humour is to subvert the accepted order of things. Whenever an individual or a group take themselves too seriously, humour — especially satire — cut them down to size. For example, humour was really important for subverting the Puritan hegemony in 17th century England. [Read more...]


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