A bubble of complacency

Yarl's Wood immigration detention centre

One of the things that enables me to function more-or-less effectively is the notion that bad things won’t happen to me. I call this “the bubble of complacency”. The bubble is a sense that all is well, life is generally benevolent, and other people do not actively wish one harm, and that the arc of [Read More...]

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Stephen Fry, burrowing insects, and lions and tigers and bears

The Horse Botfly, which lays its eggs on horses' skin and infests the horse's intestines.

Christianity assumes that humans are the pinnacle of “creation” and that the world exists for our benefit. Atheists often turn this on its head and claim that the universe is hostile, but fail to notice that we are just one species among other species. The universe is neither 100% hostile, nor is it 100% benign.

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Art, Agriculture, and Ancestors

Too Much Pig, artist: Brian Sobaski

Each year in October we move as pilgrims through the rural landscape, stopping at each station to read, consider, pause, interact, take pictures, try the food. [Read more...]

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Joy at the Breakfast Table

shutterstock_169203356

Maybe this is the best we can do for each other, ever: to keep a little space clear in all our relations to allow family, friends, colleagues, to be and become themselves. [Read more...]

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Moving Beyond “Environmentalism”

Madeline Island 2014

The world is alive and aware and we are part of it. [Read more...]

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A Theology of Trees and Fractals

Every day we wake up is Choose Your Own Adventure, wildwood, labyrinth, if we have the eyes to see. [Read more...]

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When knowledge was power

Lynne Kelly

Ritual often seems like an activity designed only for interaction with the preternatural or the supernatural. However, in non-literate (oral) cultures, it can have a mnemonic function – to remember and pass on traditional lore, about how to grow and manage crops, about animal and plant species, how to interact with the land, how to use tools. [Read more...]

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