Polytheistic Monism: A Guest Post by Christopher Scott Thompson (Part Two)

Image adapted from "Hobbit Home" by shes_so_high. Originally posted on Flickr. CC license 2.0

Thompson explicates the relationship between henotheism and monism and looks at polytheistic monism in historical context. [Read more...]

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Polytheistic Monism: A Guest Post by Christopher Scott Thompson (Part One)

Christopher Scott Thompson

Some heathens and polytheists express hostility toward a perspective they define as monism, seeing it as the complete opposite of polytheism, a modern or at least relatively new “corruption” of polytheism, a version of henotheism, a backdoor to monotheism or even a synonym for monotheism. Christopher Scott Thompson argues that these perceptions are largely based on misunderstandings of the terms, and that a polytheistic monism is indeed possible. [Read more...]

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A Dance of Impermanence: Introducing Myself in Two Chapters (Otherwise Titled, Why Am I Here and Who Am I, Anyway?)

Me, with Tree

New contributor, Sarah Sadie! “I went into the class defining myself as a loose-ish, pagan-ish follower-ish of an undefined goddess figure, and I more or less believed that all the gods and goddesses are really archetypes. I changed my mind pretty quick when I was approached by Wayland the Smith, a more-than-mortal figure about whom I knew nothing.” [Read more...]

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Polytheism and mystery

Josephine Wall, "Moon Goddess"

Polytheism ought to mean “many deities”, with no other qualifications, and include all varieties that recognise many deities. However, the term has been hedged about with so many codicils and footnotes, it is starting to look like the doctrine of the Trinity (apparently simple, but actually incredibly complicated). [Read more...]

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Your mountain is not my mountain and that’s just fine

Moraine Lake, Rocky Mountains

Metaphors for religion are tricky things, especially when we try to stretch them and make them work too hard by trying to turn them into analogies. One very popular metaphor for explaining religious diversity is the idea that we are all walking different paths up the same mountain. However, many people are coming to believe (myself included) that we are in fact all walking up different mountains. [Read more...]

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Wiccanate Privilege and Polytheist Wiccans

Wiccanate Privilege

We should dismantle Wiccanate privilege as soon as possible. Let’s have devotional polytheism, liturgical Paganism, Wiccan (rather than Wiccan-flavoured) ritual, revived Eleusinian mysteries, Heathen blots, Druid rituals… And let’s not have assumptions about what Pagans believe. [Read more...]

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Lupercalia

Yvonne Aburrow

Whatever the origins and timing of Valentine’s Day, 14 February was originally the date of a very different festival – the festival of Lupercalia. This was a fertility festival honouring the she-wolf who suckled Romulus and Remus. It also honoured Lupercus, god of shepherds. The festivities were presided over by the priesthood of the Luperci, who were dedicated to Faunus. They sacrificed two goats and a dog. There was then a sacrificial feast, and the Luperci cut thongs called februa from the skins of the animals, dressed themselves in the skins of the sacrificed goats, and ran round the walls of the old Palatine city. They struck all those who came near with the thongs. Young women would line up on their route to receive lashes from these whips. This was reputed to ensure fertility, prevent sterility, and ease the pains of childbirth. [Read more...]

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