L.B.: Not a conspiracy theory

Left Behind, pp. 80-87

Investigative reporter Buck Williams, we learn here, was headed to London to meet with his old college friend Dirk Burton. (For those keeping score at home, our list of male porn names thus far: Buck, Steele, Plank, Dirk.)

Dirk is "a former Princeton classmate" of Buck's, "a Welshman who had been working in the London financial district since graduate school." That much makes him sound like a sane, respectable fellow. But then we read this:

"Dirk Burton had been a reliable source in the past, tipping off Buck about secret high-level meetings among international financiers."

Ah. "International financiers."

There are, of course, real people who really work as financiers. And, since some of these people work internationally, they can accurately be called "international financiers." Yet these two words together convey much more than that. They come with a host of conspiratorial connotations. LaHaye and Jenkins are poised on the threshhold of the looking glass, inches away from a LaRouchian wonderland.

To their credit, sort of, L&J seem to realize this. What unfolds over the next several pages is an unsuccessful tightrope act as they try to have it both ways. They want to convince readers that neither they nor Buck are mere conspiracy theorists, while simultaneously outlining a grand conspiracy theory.

Even as they follow the trail blazed by John Birchers and LaRouchies, they want to demonstrate that they have nothing in common with such people. They thus take pains to identify the main figures in their grand plot as Anglo-Americans and WASPs, hoping to avoid the anti-Semitism of most such theories in which "international financiers" is a coded synonym for "international Jewish bankers" or just, "The Jews."

The year before LB was written, Pat Robertson had published his own End Times conspiracy theory, The New World Order, in which he repeated some of the nastier delusions about international Jewish bankers. L&J may have taken note of the criticism this prompted. In any case, "The Jews" have a different role to play in their apocalyptic fantasy, so they have cast their shadow-government of international financiers differently. (We'll see quite a bit more of L&J's complex, conflicted attitude toward The Jews in the chapters to come.)

So first we get a couple of pages in which L&J doth protest too much that they do not "buy into conspiracy theories." Buck at first is skeptical of Dirk's allegations of a shadow-government:

"You think these guys are the real world leaders, right?"

"I wouldn't go that far, Cam," Dirk had said. "All I know is, they're big, they're private, and after they meet, major things happen."

"So you think they get world leaders elected, handpick dictators, that kind of a thing?"

"I don't belong to the conspiracy book club, if that's what you mean."

Conspiracy theories? No, no, no, no, no. Not at all. No.

Well, a little.

Here it is:

"… the scuttlebutt is that this guy is real hot on getting the whole world into one currency. You know half our time is spent on exchange rates and all that. Takes computers forever to constantly readjust every day, based on the whims of the markets. …

Buck had passed off most of Dirk Burton's ideas until a few years later when Dirk had called him in the middle of the night. "Cameron," he had said, unaware of the nickname bestowed by his friend's colleagues, "I can't talk long. You can pursue this or you can just watch it happen and wish it had been your story. But you remember that stuff I was saying about the one world currency?"

"Yeah, I'm still dubious."

"Fine, but I'm telling you the word here is that our guy pushed the idea at the last meeting of these secret financiers and something's brewing."

"What's brewing?"

"Well, there's going to be a major United Nations Monetary Conference, and the topic is going to be streamlining currency … They have it down to three currencies for the entire world, hoping to go to just one inside a decade. … If my information is correct, the initial stage is a done deal. The U.N. conference is just window dressing."

This, then, is Step 1 in the Grand Plot — a single currency for the entire world. As far as the nefarious master plans of evil geniuses go, this one seems, well, more odd than evil. Call me old-fashioned, but I prefer something more along the lines of a giant space-based death-ray.

I don't know enough about economics to evaluate all that the move to a single world currency would entail, how difficult such a thing might be or what all the implications would be for international trade or the wealth of nations. As a reader of the novel, it shouldn't be my job to figure all that out for myself. Unfortunately, my only guide to such questions in LB is Buck Williams, who again demonstrates his staggering journalistic incuriosity and has no interest in exploring them.

One can imagine this as the subject of an airport novel by a capable hack such as Michael Crichton. He'd do enough research to make the subject plausible, running the manuscript past economists (in Crichton's case, right-wing economists) who could help ensure that the plot made sense. (The inevitable movie version, "Rate of Exchange," would star Michael Douglas as the investment banker who uncovers the plot, but is forced to go on the run when agents of the shadow government frame him for the murder of his mistress. "In a world of international finance …" trailer-guy intones at the beginning of the preview.)

L&J don't have to bother with any such research because this move to a single world currency is for them, literally, an article of faith. They believe this will happen as the fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Specifically, they believe it is foretold in Revelation 13:16-17: "[The beast] also forced everyone, small and great, free and slave, to receive a mark on his right hand or on his forehead, so that no one could buy or sell unless he had the mark …"

This beast, by the way, is described as having "two horns like a lamb, but he spoke like a dragon." You almost have to pity L&J for their determination to interpret such passages "literally."

Dirk Diggler Burton also reveals to Buck the identity of "the power behind the power … the mightiest of the secret group of international money men." No, it's not Dr. Victor Von Doom, it's … Jonathan Stonagal:

Buck had hoped that Dirk would name someone ludicrous so he could burst into laughter. But he had to admit, if only to himself, that if there was anything to this, Stonagal would be a logical choice. One of the richest men in the world and long known as an American power broker, Stonagal would have to be involved if serious global finance was being discussed. Though he was already in his eighties and appeared infirm in news photos, he not only owned the biggest banks and financial institutions in the United States, but he also owned or had huge interests in the same throughout the world. …

Stonagal seems like an interesting figure. The man owns "the biggest banks" — plural — as well as the biggest "financial institutions." I don't comprehend the advantage Stonagal sees in owning several competing banks without consolidating them into a single institution, but then I'm not an international financier and power broker. I also don't understand why someone like Stonagal, who could easily make a fortune exploiting international exchange rates, would be so eager to eliminate this cash cow in the drive for a single currency, but maybe if I owned several banks in countries thoughout the world the logic of such a step would be clearer to me.

The plot unfolded exactly as Dirk had described it to Buck. With Stonagal pulling the strings behind the scenes, a strangely competent, efficient and powerful United Nations had decreed the "streamlining" down to three currencies for the entire world. "Many Third World countries fought the change," L&J tell us, although they do not say why.

Buck had told only Steve Plank of his tip on the U.N. meetings, but he didn't say where he'd gotten the information, and neither he nor Plank felt it worth a speculative article. "Too risky," Steve had said. Soon they both wished they had run with it in advance. "You'd have become even more of a legend, Buck."

I understand Buck's regret at not running the article. But even more than that you'd think he'd regret not having invested everything he owned in dollars, marks and yen. He could've made a fortune — at least enough to afford hotels with laundry service.

Dirk and Buck had become closer than ever, and it wasn't unusual for Buck to visit London on short notice. If Dirk had a serious lead, Buck packed and went. … [But now] he was stuck in Chicago, after the most electrifying phenomenon in world history.

Ah, that's right. Buck is still in Chicago. More precisely, he is still in a stall in the men's room of the Pan-Con Club at O'Hare.

He won't leave the stall for another two pages.

  • Jesurgislac

    He could’ve made a fortune — at least enough to afford hotels with laundry service.
    *cackles*
    Thanks – you made my Saturday!

  • Jesurgislac

    He could’ve made a fortune — at least enough to afford hotels with laundry service.
    *cackles*
    Thanks – you made my Saturday!

  • Scott

    I keep thinking of that episode of “Arrested Development” where they did the movie of the week about the family’s troubles. Basically, Ron Howard, the series narrator, goes on about how the movie overused a narrator to mask the poor acting abilities of the cast, how the narrator ruined everything, etc.

  • Matt

    Jerry Jenkins, quoted in a TV Guide article on the Revelations miniseries on NBC:
    “I’m encouraged that the production values are good, so that Revelations will be popular and will keep the debate alive. Unfortunately what Bill Pullman, as the show’s skeptic, comes to believe is,” oh God, wait for it, I can barely stop snorting with derision long enough to type it, “a mishmash of myth, silliness and misrepresentation. No one believes that Jesus will return again as a baby.”
    Bahahaha.

  • pharoute

    international financiers and the UN working together?! man, this is fiction.

  • Ray

    This is another of those literal translations that prove somebody is speaking a different language. I thought the mark on the forehead/hand was ‘obviously’ a reference to barcodes and/or implanted credit chips. Why does it mean a single currency?
    (And why does it not mean, like, a physical mark on the right hand or the forehead? Okay, I know, silly question…)

  • chris

    It’s kind of a pity for them that they didn’t wait a few years. Then they could have seen how actual monetary union is achieved, through central banks, pegging currencies to a virtual currency, etc. And they could have had the sinister Euro mongers taking over the world.

  • Denizen

    Having read all 12 books, wheather or not these “international financiers” are Jews or not, it dosen’t matter as they won’t show up again or warrent a mention anywhere in the later books, somewhat like Chiam Rosenwieg’s Miracle formula; we never hear how it affects the world when the Antichrist gets control of it and distributes it to every nation. In the thrid book, Nicolae gets funding from his evil plans through the seizing of oil in the middle-east and Alaska (sounds like a certain U.S president), and apparently not from the “international financiers”. It isn’t mentioned if any of the Jewish characters are part of this group, though in “The Rising: The Antichrist is Born” Stonagal and the others are revealed to be some kind of New age spiritalists in league with Satan. An even more absurd scenerio.

  • Mabus

    Ray, the literal mark comes later. I won’t say any more than that, just in case you should ever read it for yourself. (Fat chance, I know.)

  • Mabus

    Ray, the literal mark comes later. I won’t say any more than that, just in case you should ever read it for yourself. (Fat chance, I know.)

  • VKW

    Fred, thanks for covering another 8 pages. I tried to read the first novel, but couldn’t get past the first page. And I’ve read and enjoyed some 19th century Russian novels, so it ain’t so much the religiosity. In a world alive with possibilities, it is sad to think that so many people think that we’re all a bunch of puppets being force-marched to a predetermined end.
    I also want to appreciate your comments about the “international financiers”. People who hate Jews seem to like using code words to obfuscate their meaning to us non-haters. Another good code word is “Hollywood”.

  • Karl

    he inevitable movie version, “Rate of Exchange,”…
    Brilliant! You’ve got Crichton pegged…
    …and I say that as someone who kinda enjoyed his earlier novels.

  • Sandals

    Dollars Marks and Yens? Has LB really been around longer than the Euro?

  • http://bluebelle.blogs.com/bluestreak/2005/04/and_me_without_.html Blue Streak

    And me without a camera

    Link: slacktivist: L.B.: Not a conspiracy theory.

  • Constantine

    The thing to remember is that bankers are already known to get together and have meetings, but they do things like bail out Long Term Capital Management or deal with the collapse of Barings Bank. The thing is that no one calls them “international financiers” when they do this.
    The impression I get is that this is the red-state evangelical analog to “liberal elites” who supposedly don’t quite understand what goes on in “flyover country”– LeHaye and Jenkins are people who grew up and never knew anyone who went to Princeton, never knew anyone who went into investment banking, worked for the UN, or became a journalist. As a consequence, their descriptions of dealing with UN officials, journalists, and financiers never come across as believeable or realistic– rather, it’s just the evangelical caricatures of these things that they depict.
    I had thought that Left Behind #1 came out in 1996– Europe was already unified at this point and it was public knowledge that plans to adopt a single currency were in the works. I suppose the ignorance of this is another thing that makes LB seem “dated” already… much like those 70s-era sci-fi books I used to read that depicted Brazil as a competing world power “in the near future.”

  • deckko

    “… the scuttlebutt is that this guy is real hot on getting the whole world into one currency. You know half our time is spent on exchange rates and all that. Takes computers forever to constantly readjust every day, based on the whims of the markets. …
    ha ha ha… I can see “International Bankers” hand cranking Curtas’ faster than the change in exchange rates.

  • jean

    …”Rate of Exchange,” would star Michael Douglasas the investment banker who uncovers the plot, but is forced to go on the run when agents of the shadow government frame him for the murder of his mistress.
    Dude! I think I saw that movie! As a matter of fact… yeah, here it is. I’ve got it on BetaMax…

  • Constantine

    Takes computers forever to constantly readjust every day, based on the whims of the markets.
    Wait a sec… this is an awfully odd construction. How does something take “forever” that you do “constantly”? If it took computers “forever” to readjust currencies, then they wouldn’t do it constantly.
    Ok, now I feel like one of those people critiquing the writing and language use of Thomas Friedman or The DaVinci Code

  • Thlayli

    Yes, I realize I’m the third person to comment on this line, but:
    Takes computers forever to constantly readjust every day, based on the whims of the markets. …
    Sure — if by “forever”, you mean “milliseconds”.

  • burritoboy

    Minor quibbles:
    1. Almost no Welshman (or Welshwoman) would go to Princeton for an undergraduate degree. Princeton happens to be extraordinarily expensive. A Welsh person might go to Oxford, Cambridge or LSE if he didn’t want to stay in Wales for uni. Wales tends to be somewhat poorer than England proper – there are very few Welsh parents who could so easily afford an American Ivy education that they would permit their kids to go to Princeton as opposed to demanding their kids get the much, much cheaper English/Welsh versions.
    2. Financial power isn’t defined by owning “several banks”. In fact, almost none of the best-known “financiers” work at commercial banks anymore. The most influential (whether they’re really “powerful” is very questionable) tend to run investment funds, not run banks. No one really cares about commercial banks anymore – they’re mostly just providers of totally commoditized services (transaction processing, cash management services, credit lines, etc.). And, except for some unusual situations, ultra-rich people didn’t get that way owning banks and none of them is especially anxious to go out and buy banks either.
    L&J (and their audience) simply have no idea what they’re talking about. From what I can tell, they got their info. from reading the evangelical anti-Wall Street propaganda of the 1920s.
    3. I don’t think there’s any external reason whatsoever behind the One World Conspiracy besides L&J’s fundamentalist interpretation of Revelations 13:16-17, as slacktavist mentions. Really, there are only three main currencies anyway (dollar, euro and yen). A guy owning numerous banks would likely be opposing a single world currency – one of commercial banks’ larger lines of business is currency trading.
    4. As Constantine mentions, do “financiers” get together in meetings? Well, to some extent, they do and, even doing things like bailing out Barings is rare. The vast majority of the meetings are intensly boring stuff about transaction processing platforms, and things like that.
    Again, L&J are going off some reflection of anti-Wall Street propaganda, either cribbed from LaRoucher or possibly evangelical anti-Wall Street proganda from early in the last century.

  • burritoboy

    Minor quibbles:
    1. Almost no Welshman (or Welshwoman) would go to Princeton for an undergraduate degree. Princeton happens to be extraordinarily expensive. A Welsh person might go to Oxford, Cambridge or LSE if he didn’t want to stay in Wales for uni. Wales tends to be somewhat poorer than England proper – there are very few Welsh parents who could so easily afford an American Ivy education that they would permit their kids to go to Princeton as opposed to demanding their kids get the much, much cheaper English/Welsh versions.
    2. Financial power isn’t defined by owning “several banks”. In fact, almost none of the best-known “financiers” work at commercial banks anymore. The most influential (whether they’re really “powerful” is very questionable) tend to run investment funds, not run banks. No one really cares about commercial banks anymore – they’re mostly just providers of totally commoditized services (transaction processing, cash management services, credit lines, etc.). And, except for some unusual situations, ultra-rich people didn’t get that way owning banks and none of them is especially anxious to go out and buy banks either.
    L&J (and their audience) simply have no idea what they’re talking about. From what I can tell, they got their info. from reading the evangelical anti-Wall Street propaganda of the 1920s.
    3. I don’t think there’s any external reason whatsoever behind the One World Conspiracy besides L&J’s fundamentalist interpretation of Revelations 13:16-17, as slacktavist mentions. Really, there are only three main currencies anyway (dollar, euro and yen). A guy owning numerous banks would likely be opposing a single world currency – one of commercial banks’ larger lines of business is currency trading.
    4. As Constantine mentions, do “financiers” get together in meetings? Well, to some extent, they do and, even doing things like bailing out Barings is rare. The vast majority of the meetings are intensly boring stuff about transaction processing platforms, and things like that.
    Again, L&J are going off some reflection of anti-Wall Street propaganda, either cribbed from LaRoucher or possibly evangelical anti-Wall Street proganda from early in the last century.

  • http://www.liberaltopia.org/archives/2005/04/a_day_late_a_di.php Grouchy’s Liberaltopia

    A Day Late, A Digital Camera Short

    As most of you hipsters know, Fridays are cat-blogging or whatever- floats-your-boat-blogging days. I don’t have a cat, I do have a digital camera, but it’s a piece of crap. I thought about posting pictures of fish on fridays, or…

  • http://www.liberaltopia.org/archives/2005/04/a_day_late_a_di.php Grouchy’s Liberaltopia

    A Day Late, A Digital Camera Short

    As most of you hipsters know, Fridays are cat-blogging or whatever- floats-your-boat-blogging days. I don’t have a cat, I do have a digital camera, but it’s a piece of crap. I thought about posting pictures of fish on fridays, or…

  • Grimgrin

    Actually, I don’t think anyone would be in favour of having a single global currency. In Canada, the idea gets floated every now and again that we should adopt the U.S. dollar as our currency in the interestes of ‘simplicity’ or whatever.
    Three general arguments why currency unions (Absent the degree of economic integration that existed in the EEC) are a bad idea.
    1) This means surrendering control of your nations monetary policy to another country/entity. In Canada’s case supporters of a single currency tended to assume that both nations would allways benifit from the same set of policies, other people helpfully pointed out that this assumption was completely insane.
    2) Changing it over is complicated. How do you approach the changeover? If you just convert all currencies at a given exchange rate (One U.S. Dollar == One Satan Dollar and go from there) You wind up wiping out the savings of contries with undervalued currencies and causing massive inflation in the ones with overvalued currencies. You do it the other way (1:1 for all currencies) it amounts to a massive transfer of value from rich to poor. Just what the “International Financiers” are all about eh?
    3) The ballance between Import/Export economy would be messed up. A country that exports more goods than it imports benifits from a weak currency and vice versa. Indeed, China and India would be dead set against this, because it eliminates their biggest competitive advantage. Resource based economies like Canada, Russia, Brazil and others would also hate it, because it drives up the prices of their goods.
    It’s not as implausable as The Rapture and Israels Divine Missile Defence Sheild. But it’s close. Really really close. If only because just about everyone on earth would be directly fucked over by this, one way or another, and noone would benifit significantly, and supposedly it gets through without comment.

  • http://www.liberaltopia.org/archives/2005/04/a_day_late_a_di.php Grouchy’s Liberaltopia

    A Day Late, A Digital Camera Short

    As most of you hipsters know, Fridays are cat-blogging or whatever-floats-your-boat-blogging days. I don’t have a cat, I do have a digital camera, but it’s a piece of crap. I thought about posting pictures of fish on fridays, or even…

  • Ray

    Okay, I’m confused again. If the actual, physical mark of Satan is yet to come, why is a single currency predicted by rev 13:16-17? What kind of literal reading is that?

  • http://www.liberaltopia.org/archives/2005/04/a_day_late_a_di_1.php Grouchy’s Liberaltopia

    A Day Late, A Digital Camera Short

    As most of you hipsters know, Fridays are cat-blogging or whatever-floats-your-boat-blogging days. I don’t have a cat, I do have a digital camera, but it’s a piece of crap. I thought about posting pictures of fish on fridays, or even…

  • Keith

    …No, it’s not Dr. Victor Von Doom
    But if it were, that would explain everything: the missing people (zapped into the Negative Zone), finagling Russia to unload it’s arsenal on Israel only to shield them with a force field (so he could then waltz in to Moscow and have the entire Russian industrial complex at his disposal) and then take advantage of the chaos caused by all those missing people to… convert the world’s economy to one currency, of his own devising. And launch his space based death ray.
    …a strangely competent, efficient and powerful United Nations…
    Your evil, one world government isn’t that scary if it’s a tangle of beuracratic red tape and internecine squabbling between adversarial nation states. You know, like the UN in the real world.

  • chris

    Keith,
    Remeber that L&J are part of the black helicopter, FEMA eats babies crowd. They’re afraid of the federa; government too. You know the hyper-effiecent entity that gives us Amtrak and $500 hammers. So of course the UN will not only do evil but is actually good at it.

  • Andy

    You are brilliant, I am so addicted to your LB posts!

  • Andy

    You are brilliant, I am so addicted to your LB posts!

  • Gus

    You do it the other way (1:1 for all currencies) it amounts to a massive transfer of value from rich to poor. Just what the “International Financiers” are all about eh?
    True, but then their antichrist IS from Romania, not one of the wealthier countries on Earth. L&J’s whole antichrist attitude has much less to do with Revelation than it does with an abiding horror of the transfer of economic and political power to those who aren’t Christians (as they define them, which basically means not WASP), so a monetary system that even approached such a thing WOULD be evil to them.
    The irony is that some of their paranoia is based in fact — not “international financiers” but multinational conglomerates DO have a vested interest homogenizing Earth’s people down to the lowest common denominator, and they corrupt governments in ways that everyday people don’t get to counter effectively by just voting. Although that’s a “leftist” interpretation, L&J see the same effects & are upset they can’t do anything about it, so they expect “The Rapture” to enable “their” people to avoid the issue entirely. (Not a very responsible attitude…)

  • Andrew C.

    Am I the only person who read “Stonegal” and immediately thought “Gall Stone?”
    Re the head/hand thing – the way it was explained to me was that the forehead signifies intention or thought, and the hand signifies deed. The mark is not necessarily a physical one, but it somehow requires collaboration with the Beast in both intention and action (IOW, you can’t fake it).

  • Atrios

    He’s still in the stall? Damn, that’s impressive. Kazuo Ishiguro’s “The Unconsoled” frequently like that – elevator trips allowing for several pages of dialogue, etc… – but, that was a deliberate time/space bending by the author, not just stupidity.

  • Mabus

    I suppose, in theory, one could claim that the implausible behavior of the “international financiers” is deliberate on L&J’s part–that it is an indication of something sinister going on behind the scenes, since it makes no sense for the financiers to do something like that based on normal self-interest. I completely missed this when I read Left Behind way back in 97 or 98, shortly after it came out–I was just then getting started in college, from a poor family, and had not the slightest knowledge of business.
    By the way, given the strange interests of Buck and his colleagues, maybe Global Weekly isn’t Newsweek at all. Could it be that….gasp…they work for the Weekly World News?!? They’re so heavily invested in making up ridiculous stories for the gullible that when bizarre things actually happen, they barely notice.

  • Keith

    Maybe Mabus is right.
    If Buck works for the Weekly World News, that would explain some things: Perhaps the rest of the world is being kept in the dark by the nefarious Liberal Media and so he and his friends are the only ones with access to the truth, sort of how in the Men in Black world, the best investigative journalism is done by tabloids. All it would take is an extra chapter or two at the beginning where everyone is mollified by some ludicrous answer to the disapearences by some media talking heads who appear on every channel to say the same things.
    But that would actually be an interesting story.

  • glooperoo

    Fred,
    This post made we wonder if you’ve ever written about the connections between LaHaye and the Reverend Moon. While the “International Financiers” stuff might be a little too “out there”, there’s always room for a Moonie-LeHaye Conspiracy! :-D

  • R.

    But- excuse me if I got something about the way American politics works wrong here, but aren’t the Left Behind types and the closest thing that the real world has to “international financiers” (ok, most of them) in the same party in your country? How does that work out? Do they see themselves as evil conspirators? I’m confused.

  • Dawn

    I can’t believe I just read all of your Left Behind entries, beginning to end. Highly entertaining, and it reminded me just how bad those books are
    (and yes, I’ve read my fair share of them as well).

  • Mabus

    R., most of the “Christian Right” are not particularly rich. Their membership in the Republican party is basically an alliance of convenience. It’s not so much a trust in wealthy businessman as a mutual lack of trust in government handling of money.

  • R. Mildred

    Well the headliners for the christian right are quite rich (Lahaye and Jenkins are bestselling novelists after all) but they’re not really international financiers per se, “international financier” falls on the “global jewish banker” side of the great conspiracy theory triangle, the other two sides are made of the neo-fuedal “Business Tycoon”, which much of the rich christian right wing are but only socialists hate, and “Alien Overlords”, which Lahaye and jenkins just appear to be based on the unfamiliarity with humanity and the world around them presented in their bestselling novels about something they say they believe will happen anyday now.

  • R. Mildred

    Well the headliners for the christian right are quite rich (Lahaye and Jenkins are bestselling novelists after all) but they’re not really international financiers per se, “international financier” falls on the “global jewish banker” side of the great conspiracy theory triangle, the other two sides are made of the neo-fuedal “Business Tycoon”, which much of the rich christian right wing are but only socialists hate, and “Alien Overlords”, which Lahaye and jenkins just appear to be based on the unfamiliarity with humanity and the world around them presented in their bestselling novels about something they say they believe will happen anyday now.

  • Chad

    I haven’t read the books, but isn’t the whole “my old college buddy happens to know about an international conspiracy!” thing a ludicrously convenient plot twist, even if they’re both from Princeton?
    And on that note, do they ever establish how Dirk knows all this? Does the Secretary to the Ten Anglo-Bankers keep accidentally sending him memos? With sources like this, no wonder Buck is the world’s greatest journalist yet never appears to do anything!
    Argh, I’m not even reading the books and they’re breaking my brain.

  • glooperoo

    Check it out! Even Ratzinger has an opinion on the “New World Order”, which normally ties in to the International Financiers/Uber-Bankers stuff (although Ratzinger seems to use the term “New World Order” more loosely).
    This was back in 1997, so I guess he had some time to rethink his opposition to the NWO, since he co-founded an interreligious organization with both Neil Bush and some other questionable characters just two years later, and if anyone’s part of the NWO, the Bushies sure are.
    So we got the new pope commenting on the New World Order, LaHaye & Company falling under the “I am the new messiah” Moonies’ umbrella (along with much of DC), and we’re potentially on the verge of seeing the dollar fall through the floor and turn into a joke currency wreaking utter havoc on the global economy in the process. LOL, I love it when life immitates “art”.

  • Bo

    Regarding Porn star names: I had the following co-workers at my last job…Neal Leatherman, Don Long, Chuck Love, and Richard Wood. Can anyone beat that?

  • jf

    I once met a man named Hap (short for Happy) Hazard. (Hardly a porno name, admittedly.)

  • Bo

    Oh, I forgot the absolute best one…Johnny Wild. No kidding.

  • cjmr

    he inevitable movie version, “Rate of Exchange,”…
    Brilliant! You’ve got Crichton pegged…
    Actually, I was thinking that sounded more like Grisham than Crichton…

  • Scott

    And we get this little jem from Hal Lindsey:
    …Those who would expose the Money Trust don’t really want to break the banker’s stranglehold – that would launch a global economic depression that would make the 1930s look like an economic boom. The Money Trust has set up a system that is so insidious, that once in place, it cannot be removed without bringing the whole global economy down.
    The current economic panic is translating into legislative red tape that will eventually hamstring the way corporations operate. But legislating the profit out of a free-market economy is a fool’s errand.
    To make political points and win re-election, one side of America’s political aisle is leading an all-out charge against Wall Street, attempting to capitalize on the old canard that the Republicans are on the side of Big Business.
    Talk about double-minded. Ten years ago, the same party campaigned for Clinton with the slogan, “It’s the economy, stupid.” But then Democrats don’t care about consistency, just winning at any cost.
    All that aside, the really important thing that is being set up is being overlooked.
    Bible prophets predict a very specific kind of world economy for the days leading to the second coming of Christ. For this predicted economy to be possible, there had to be a number of recent technological inventions and consequent conditions.
    First, there had to be computers that could number and track every person on Earth. We now have them.
    Second, world conditions had to be such that all people would be conditioned to receive a chip under his skin with a unique number. Such implanted chip technology has now been successfully tried. The threat of card theft, identity theft and need for national security has just about removed all natural résistance to this one.
    Third, money had to be cut free from the barter-type system that required that it be based on something of intrinsic worth, such as gold and silver. Now money is floating free of everything but the Money Trust regulators. All obstacles in the United States were removed when it embraced the Federal Reserve system – the Money Trust’s smoke and mirrors masterpiece. …

  • Vashti

    I’m reasonably confident, having lived in Wales since I was seven, that there are *no* Welsh people called Dirk. This is probably why he wound up at Princeton – he’s an American fifth columnist here to steal our sheep.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X