Leftovers again

Apologies for not tying all this together.

The paper I work for is in Delaware and I’ve spent the past week in Super-Tuesday-prep mode. So even though I live in Pennsylvania, and we’re not part of today’s festivities, I’ve had the nagging feeling all day that I should be voting.

Soylent Green is poor people!” TBogg 10, Megan McArdle 0. McArdle argues that “the poor don’t need more food,” because, like, she once saw a poor person who was fat and they were eating, like, potato chips. Or something.

Expect more of this sort of thing if the economy gets worse. Increased insecurity leads to increased anxiety which leads more people to, like McArdle, close their eyes, shove their fingers in their ears, and chant, “The poor deserve their poverty, so that can’t happen to me. The poor deserve their …”

Michael Joseph Gross on Richard Mellon Scaife in Vanity Fair,A Vast Right-Wing Hypocrisy.” It’s a baroque epic of appalling behavior. (Sure, the super-rich sometimes make bad choices — but do they eat potato chips?) Scaife is quite candid about his disdain for the moralizers he’s funded over the years, and that he regards them as simply tools to be used in the political defense of concentrated wealth.

What I found most interesting was Scaife’s account of his lunch with Bill Clinton. The former president — the object of decades of Scaife-funded vitriolic nonsense-gates — seems to have sized up what might be accomplished during such an encounter and then, instead of revisiting the misery of their long enmity, decided to treat the old buzzard the same as any other visitor who happened to have scads of extra money lying around:

Scaife left the meeting with an autographed copy of Bill Clinton’s My Life and a head full of thoughts about the “scourge of AIDS” in Africa, which the two had discussed in detail — though Scaife emphasizes, twice, that Clinton “did most of the talking.” Back in Pittsburgh, Scaife decided to send a $100,000 personal check to the Clinton Global Initiative. That got him thinking about AIDS locally, he says, and so when he found a direct-mail solicitation for Persad, Pittsburgh’s AIDS service center, in his mailbox, he wrote that group a check, too.

People like what other people like.” Every DJ already knew that. I made the mistake, back in college, of playing “Love Shack” before it was a hit. That cleared the dance floor and raised a chorus of derisive hoots. Six weeks later, the same crowd/flock was requesting the same song.

* * *

Martin Marty on evangelicals:

“Anything anybody can say about Evangelicalism is true” is my take-off from Emmett Grogan’s “Anything anybody can say about America is true.” He and his truism issued from the ’60s, a period when I would not have known about or spoken of the Protean character of modern American evangelicalism. Back then, schooled by the likes of the late Carl F. Henry, we thought Evangelicalism cohered around a distinctive theology born of 19th century Princeton-born thought and 20th century Billy Graham evangelistic style. It was “soft” and “open” post-fundamentalism at its core.

These years, with one-fourth of America identifying or being identified as evangelical, leaders within, critics without, and editorialists within and without are trying to find coherence. Of course, there are some continuities, such as: 1) a high view of biblical authority, but by no means always or any longer the old doctrine of inerrancy; 2) a high Christology but one with bewildering variations; 3) a commitment to evangelizing, making converts, and growing, but in competitive and sometimes mutually contradictory forms; 4) a dream of community, but now challenged by individualist, go-it-alone spiritualities and mega- and post- and emergent- and traditional styles; 5) an involvement with public life, but by no means reducible to the politically “Christian right.”

I stumbled across that while failing to find a convenient distillation online of Marty et. al.’s exhaustive and insightful study, The Fundamentalism Project, which is my guess as to the source of what Raka described in comments earlier as “an extremist for cause A will have more ideological and behavioral resemblance to an extremist for any given cause X than they would to a moderate for cause A.” That, in a nutshell, was what the project’s research concluded.

Anyway, as Marty says, modern American evangelicalism is Protean. It is also frequently Procrustean, but rarely Promethean. Discuss.

* * *

I’ve mentioned before the separation between advertising and editorial at newspapers. Among other things, that means when your ad department puts together the announcement of primary election ads, nobody in editorial sees them until after they hit the page. So it wasn’t until the presses rolled that we noticed a Very Bad typo — Monday’s ad said that the polls today would close at 1 p.m. instead of 8 p.m. Not good. Really, really not good. We’ve got the proper time prominently displayed on every page of today’s paper, but still. Really, really not good.

Benighted, i.e., Praline’s book. (Not this Praline, this one — tricky business, plugging someone’s book while still respecting their use of a screen name.) No, I haven’t read it yet, but the raves in comments here have pushed it to the top o’ the stack.

You won’t find Praline listed yet at “Literature Map,” but it’s still a fascinating Web thingie. Type in an author’s name and it displays a map-like array of other authors. “The closer two writers are,” it says, “the more likely someone will like both of them.” Every example I’ve searched has made me think both “Ah, yes, that makes sense” and also “WTF?” (such as the Stephen King/Agatha Christie/Kurt Vonnegut cluster — ??? — that showed up when I looked up Neil Gaiman).

Eight days until the first pitchers and catchers report to spring training. Ten days until Johan Santana reports to Port St. Lucie. I’m heading south myself — gotta get to work early tonight because the polls in Delaware close at 8 p.m. Once again, that’s 8 p.m.

  • http://jesurgislac.greatestjournal.com Jesurgislac

    Angelika: @Jesurgislac: bulbul as the one who used the word ‘animals’ in context with poor people. Please, don’t interpret into my comments derogatory remarks I never made.
    OK. You referred to poor people as a different breed of people from middle-class people. See comments by Bugmaster and pat greene for elucidation.
    John: I’ve never been on food stamps, but I have a very good idea of what it is like to feed myself on an extremely limited budget, below the food stamp allotment, because I’ve done it.
    Okay. And my guess is, that this was when you were a student?

  • http://jesurgislac.greatestjournal.com Jesurgislac

    John: I know that poor people make bad choices. It is one of the reasons they are poor, and if you are going to help them learn that they can make better choices, you’ll have to confront that inconvenient truth.
    Or else… you made bad choices, and you found that you made better choices when someone took your money away and stood at a distance lecturing you in a condescending tone about how the reason you didn’t have any money to buy food or anywhere to buy food was because you’d made bad choices?

  • Caravelle

    That has nothing to do with class except inasmuch as growing up lower class gives you a better perspective on what being poor is like and makes you more determined not to end up there.
    Also, if you come from a well-off family you’re more likely to have well-off people ready to help you in case of failure, so you can afford to take more risks.

  • bulbul

    Drak Pope,
    Cockroaches are insects, you classist son of a bitch.
    My sincerest apologies to you and all cockroaches. While I may harbor certain negative feelings and attitudes towards cockroaches, I still prefer them to torture apologists and generative grammarians.

  • Caravelle

    I know that poor people make bad choices. It is one of the reasons they are poor, and if you are going to help them learn that they can make better choices, you’ll have to confront that inconvenient truth.
    I don’t think one can deny poor people make bad choices. People in general make bad choices. Rich people make tons of bad choices, they just have a safety net that keep those bad choices from destroying their lives (the lives of others, now…).
    Though I’m sure you could find personal cases where a person ended up in poverty just through their choices I doubt you’ll find a strong correlation in general, especially compared with things like socioeconomic background, place of birth, sex/ethnicity or luck.

  • Caravelle

    bulbul : Cockroaches are insects, you classist son of a bitch.
    My sincerest apologies to you and all cockroaches.

    That’s okay. The important thing is that you don’t rescue spiders thinking they’re insects. That would be a problem ;-)

  • Caravelle

    Angelika : The lesson I learned from these experiences is, that we have to accept that differences in value systems exist between different social groups – and there is little chance of solving problems, if we don’t take these different mindsets into account. And yes, mentioning these differences is quite different from condemning somebody for their existence.
    But are those value differences between social groups, or between individuals ? You know, lazy people aren’t a South American prerogative. Hey, I am one and I’m not South American. And I’m not poor either for that matter (knock on wood). Funny, it seems that socio-economic background counts after all…

  • http://threeriversfog.blogspot.com amanda w

    I know that poor people make bad choices. It is one of the reasons they are poor, and if you are going to help them learn that they can make better choices, you’ll have to confront that inconvenient truth.
    I think your inference engine needs a tune-up.
    Everyone makes bad choices.
    Keep in mind that the skills and discipline requires to consistently make good choices in life, and recover from the bad ones, requires purposeful instruction and nurturing throughout a person’s young life. It doesn’t come to you. You don’t just learn after you stumble the first few times on your own. Oh, people learn to cope and survive after those stumbles. But they won’t have the insight requires to get ahead without someone instilling it in them. Because it is information that is not readily available in our environment — it’s more of a family’s secret recipe.
    Keep in mind that most people in poverty are in circumstances where it doesn’t matter what kind of choices you make; you will still fail. You can make the best choices in deciding where to put your $100/week, and still be another $100/week short of everything you owe: rent, utilities, groceries, health care, transportation, quite probably the minimum payment on last week’s $100 worth of debt incurred when you were also short. In that case, excepting some glorious deus ex machina, you are going to fail.
    Keep in mind that no matter how good one is at decision-making, everyone will make the occasional mistake. As Caravelle mentions, some people don’t have the support network to pick them up when they fall. They get to struggle through on their own, and they will surely see their place on the security totem pole fall, and perhaps never be able to recover.
    And as I’ve said before: when you get to this point, you kind of… stop caring. Because no matter what, you’re going to stay where you are, if not wind up worse off. So fuck it, why not have that dinner out with the family (“dinner out” being something so fancy as Denny’s). Why not buy buy that iPod or that TV. You’re in over your head, and you’re never going to get out, and you’ve never seen anyone in your family get out, and you’ve never seen anyone in your neighborhood get out, and …
    Maybe it’s not your inference engine that’s out.
    Scolding people for poor decision making won’t lift them out of the muck; it will only make their lives more miserable. Try being part of that support system they are lacking (and kudos for your apparently volunteering to do so). Try fighting for a better safety net; invest in public schools; hell, if you’re well-off enough, start a scholarship fund. But chiding them about bad decisions is like chiding a dying cancer patient for that dessert she’s having, because of all the fat and sugar in it. What is it going to matter?

  • Caravelle

    Jesu : That is the real problem, isn’t it: the conviction that if you give poor people money with no curb on how they spend it, they’ll spend it foolishly. Or some of them might, so all of them have got to be penalized.
    Or worst of all : lazy bastards might take advantage of the system. Because I’ve got this friend who’s got a friend who lives off welfare and does nothing all day and that’s just outrageous, so we should get rid of welfare.

  • http://threeriversfog.blogspot.com amanda w

    My husband is a welfare caseworker, fwiw, and (don’t let your head explode) rather conservative to boot. Even he has softened now that he has had some experience with “them.” Of course, he does have some quite entertaining stories to tell too, but that isn’t the bulk of his case load — it’s the occasional weirdo, which everyone runs into in every sector.

  • John

    Amanda, who said anything about scolding poor people for bad decisions? Not me, that is your idea. I’m saying that we as a community have to deal with poor decisions and help people learn to make better decisions. And yes, wealthy people make bad decisions too, but they aren’t living close to the edge so they usually get away with it. That doesn’t change anything about the necessity of helping poor people make better decisions and pointing out the self destructive nature of bad decisions.
    Jesu, do you have any kind of response other than snark for people who hold different opinions? Have you ever learned anything positive from someone you disagreed with? Just curious.

  • inge

    Jim, I think a better comparison than microwave pizza vs. a pound of hamburger might be comparing the microwave pizza to what it would cost you to make a equivalent pizza yourself. (I bet the one for $1.50 would be pretty small.) .
    This has no relevance for the topic, but I did the calculation for fun, using German prices from the discounter in the city. Note that food is cheap in Germany (WalMart removed itself from the low price competition because it could not keep up without breaking the law), and the chain discounter prices are pretty much the same all over the country.
    For a tuna-and-onion pizza the size of a frozen one, I get 1.60 Euro if I use baking powder, two-something if I use yeast. Time to make my own pizza: about half an hour, plus doing the dishes. If I make my own tomato sauce from scratch, time and cost goes through the roof. Frozen pizza is about 2 Euros.
    Plus, there’s no way to make a good pizza in a normal household oven. So, frozen or take-out it is.

  • Jesurgislac

    John: Jesu, do you have any kind of response other than snark for people who hold different opinions?
    Yes.
    If you mean “Why are you not nicer to people who spew out predigested conservative crap?” the answer is contained in the question…

  • Jesurgislac

    Have you ever learned anything positive from someone you disagreed with?
    Yes, when the person who disagreed with me was doing so thoughtfully and based on information.
    No, when the person who disagreed with me was coming out with the same line of crap I’ve heard a hundred times before that’s based on nothing but thoughtless prejudice.

  • inge

    Angelika: many poor people are not brought up to plan ahead for themselves and others the way more middle class families
    bulbul: And don’t forget that they’re also dirty and stupid and they breed like cockroaches. Let’s face it, we all know that’s what poor people are – animals.
    I don’t quite get why the suggestion that poor people are receiving a worse education than not-poor ones is generally regarded as in bad taste.
    That said, IME women from poor rural families are the ones who most likely will have learned to cook from scratch, but just because middle-class boys might profit most from home economics lessons is not exactly a reason to consider those lessons anathema.

  • cjmr’s husband

    @inge: I have to object to two things:
    1. The possibility that a frozen pizza is ever better than a homemade one
    2. The existance of tuna pizza
    (actually, I’ve heard that frozen pizza has improved in the last decade or so; we don’t eat pizza since cjmr is allergic to tomatoes and cjmr’s son is allergic to cheese…)
    (and I learned about tuna pizza from a German exchange student in high school. I ate them in college to shock my roommates.)

  • inge

    Bugmaster: Thus, some cultures will be more successful than others, solely because of their values.
    Only in their respective ecological niches, so to speak.
    Also, what defines a value? Punctuality, for example, is a custom. In one place showing up at 2 pm for a 4pm date might be considered rude, in other places showing up at 4 pm for a 4pm date. Generally the rule here is, “When in Rome…”, meaning that the stranger has to adapt — but this is self-referential, unfortunately. Equally, there is nothing inherently more valuable in working 60 hour weeks than 35 hour ones.
    Or is there something about their culture that makes them less willing (or, perhaps, even less able) to go into a CS career ?
    Only way to find out is to remove the structural problems keeping them from chosing one, and then see what happens. Which is, of course, a tall order.

  • inge

    pat greene: In certain circumstances I might well have stayed in the badly paid job, rather than the apprenticeship, as well
    Also, someone might just like their bad paying job. There is no law forcing anyone to take the highest paying job available. (Which is good, because otherwise there’d be a whole lot of good things left undone.)

  • inge

    Caravelle: Or worst of all : lazy bastards might take advantage of the system. Because I’ve got this friend who’s got a friend who lives off welfare and does nothing all day and that’s just outrageous, so we should get rid of welfare.
    This stupid paranoia that someone, somewhere is getting away with something is unfortunately focussed mostly on poor people. It would be far more profitably turned to the rich.
    And with regards to welfare, the most charitable way to look at the buraucracy that tries to keep anyone from getting away with anything is that it creates work for a lot of people.
    Just give enough money to cover basic needs to everyone, millionaires included, raise taxes to the degree that those who do not need it pay it back, and skip the whole bureaucratic nightmare. Has the additional advantage of getting rid of forced labour.

  • inge

    cjmr’s husband, all homemade pizza I ever had anywhere (except at the guy’s who used a lab oven to bake it) was extremely meh. The best was better than frozen, maybe enough to justify half an hour of preparation, but not half an hour of cleaning up afterwards. Also, it used ingredients which put its price over the price of a takeout. So the only reason for me to make pizza from nearly-scratch is having a pizza party in the kitchen.
    And if you are shocked by tuna pizza, you have led a sheltered life. Unless you have been introduced to Banana pizza and Pizza con Wursti i Krauti, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

  • hapax

    And if you are shocked by tuna pizza, you have led a sheltered life. Unless you have been introduced to Banana pizza and Pizza con Wursti i Krauti, you ain’t seen nothing yet.
    Cabbage pizza from the Moscow subway terminal.
    I’m just sayin’…

  • http://jesurgislac.greatestjournal.com Jesurgislac

    inge: cjmr’s husband, all homemade pizza I ever had anywhere (except at the guy’s who used a lab oven to bake it) was extremely meh.
    Someday you will have to try my homemade pizza.
    You may dislike it, but I can pretty much guarantee it won’t be “meh”.
    (I make pizza for much the same reason it was originally invented: I have enough bread dough left, and a good way to use it up is to spread it out on a baking tray, add Interesting Stuff* to the top, sprinkle cheese if intended recipients will eat cheese, and you have an open-top pie made with bread dough instead of pastry, aka pizza. Yum. A friend made a pizza once with edible flowers from her garden, and it was delicious: I must try it this year…)
    *There are exceptions. Having planned a pizza for self and friend, I went through everything in my storecupboard for her two under-10 daughters, and they finally agreed they would eat a pizza if I made it with chips. So, that’s what went on their pizza: tomato sauce, oven chips, layer of cheese.

  • cjmr’s husband

    For proper pizza, set your oven for “Thursday Flame War”. This week I recommend pepperoni, mushrooms, and the Terror Suspect thread.

  • http://jesurgislac.greatestjournal.com Jesurgislac

    Nah, Flame Wars won’t cook pizza properly. You need a steady heat.

  • cjmr’s husband

    You’re right, flame wars are for searing.

  • Bugmaster

    So, in the interests of keeping the pizza oven nice and hot, it seems like we have three conflicting viewpoints:
    1). There are no differences between cultures. Some people have different values from others, but strictly on an individual basis. Tip your pizza delivery-person appropriately. (I think Caravelle subscribes to this view, but I could be wrong).
    2). There are differences between cultures, but they don’t matter. For example, we think punctuality is a virtue, but, objectively, it’s meaningless. Who cares if your pizza is late or not. (inge seems to support this view)
    3). There are differences between cultures, and most of them don’t matter, but some do matter, objectively. If your culture doesn’t place any value on feeding every member of the society, you’ll likely end up with lots of starving people and no pizza. (Angelika supports this view, I think).
    I think that, assuming that there are differences between cultures, then almost inevitably, some of them will turn out to be important — as per my example above. If your culture doesn’t value medicine, then you’ll end up with a bunch of sick people. If it doesn’t value food, you’ll have some well-fed rich people at the top, and the starving masses at the bottom. Yes, I’m exaggerating, but I think you see my point.

  • Jeff Weskamp

    “Keep in mind that most people in poverty are in circumstances where it doesn’t matter what kind of choices you make; you will still fail. You can make the best choices in deciding where to put your $100/week, and still be another $100/week short of everything you owe: rent, utilities, groceries, health care, transportation, quite probably the minimum payment on last week’s $100 worth of debt incurred when you were also short. In that case, excepting some glorious deus ex machina, you are going to fail.” — Amanda W
    I’ve known people who have been in that situation, Amanda. And let me tell you all: unless you have been in that situation, you do not know the meaning of the word desperation.

  • Lee Ratner

    …to actually be the most practical, sensible, economic way of ensuring you have a healthy and well-educated population. The Tories hated it and starved it and beat it, and after 19 years of economic stranglement the NHS moved downhill a ways (not, of course, to the depths of US health care, but still not good: and dear God what Thatcher did to UK housing has to be bought to be believed) but the point that what you need to do is ensure people can buy good food and give them the means of buying good food has long since been proved. So why doesn’t the US just do it?”
    Historians, both pro- and anti-welfare, have been arguing on American exceptionalism to the welfare state for a long time and there is no consensus. I think its a complex mixture of issues that mainly revolves around the way government is organized in the US and the old bugbear, race. The political, really electoral organization, of the US is really hard on third parties so even though there was a socialist party, it could never really challenge the big two the way Labor could challenge the Liberals in the UK. Thus socialist leaning people often supported the Dems out of no other choice and had to damper their expectations. Race comes into it because lots of white people really wanted black people to suffer and a welfare state would really help black people not suffer. These are why the U.S. lacks a welfare state.
    There are other reasons as well. Many Americans viewed socialism as a very foreign phenomena and nativism caused many Americans who would be natural supporters of socialism in Europe to hate it. The failure of American socialists to refashion socialism for an American audience did not help.

  • Jim


    And if you are shocked by tuna pizza, you have led a sheltered life. Unless you have been introduced to Banana pizza and Pizza con Wursti i Krauti, you ain’t seen nothing yet.
    Cabbage pizza from the Moscow subway terminal.
    I’m just sayin’…

    Kimchi pizza, from when I lived in Seoul and New York. I sometimes make it now, but it’s not the same. I haven’t found it in the Koreatown we have here in Chicago.
    On the whole make-your-own v. frozen question, I have to come down on the side of make your own. The trick here (and I know this won’t be anything new to some of you) is to make your own dough and add tomato paste and seasonings (don’t skimp on the garlic) to the sauce.

  • John

    Try seafood pizza from Italy. Three small octapi, legs spread radially outward, on top. Mmmmmm boy.
    And Jesu, do you react with politeness to people who spew out predigested liberal crap? I at least try, as witnessed by the fact that I’m still trying to talk to you.

  • http://jesurgislac.greatestjournal.com Jesurgislac

    Lee: Race comes into it because lots of white people really wanted black people to suffer and a welfare state would really help black people not suffer. These are why the U.S. lacks a welfare state.
    :-(
    Jim: On the whole make-your-own v. frozen question, I have to come down on the side of make your own. The trick here (and I know this won’t be anything new to some of you) is to make your own dough and add tomato paste and seasonings (don’t skimp on the garlic) to the sauce.
    Oh yes. Never buy pre-made pizza bases, there’s really no point. Making pizza dough is dead easy, and tastes about a thousand times better. Totally with you on the garlic question, but in fact if you make your own, you can vary the sauce to suit the appetites/allergies of the people eating it – I’ve made a lovely pizza with vegan pesto for the sauce, no cheese, for a party that included a couple of vegans and a person who was misguided enough not to like tomato.
    John: I at least try, as witnessed by the fact that I’m still trying to talk to you.
    Oh, burn! I have to admit, it’s kind of sweet to see you flail like that.

  • Caravelle

    1). There are no differences between cultures. Some people have different values from others, but strictly on an individual basis. Tip your pizza delivery-person appropriately. (I think Caravelle subscribes to this view, but I could be wrong).
    You could be. I’d like to subscribe to that view but I’m not Carasure it’s correct. There’s no a priori reason why cultures (whatever you mean by that) shouldn’t be different (whatever you mean by that…) after all.
    On the other hand, what between stereotyping and masked racism I don’t trust any claim of “group X are all/mostly Y”, especially given it’s usually supported by anecdotes or “what everyone knows”.
    So in short, though I won’t actually go out and make the claim that there is no difference between cultures (which is basically a claim that cultures don’t exist, which is obviously false), I will be very sceptical and uneasy around people who ascribe various attributes to people (or societies) based on their culture.
    I think that, assuming that there are differences between cultures, then almost inevitably, some of them will turn out to be important — as per my example above. If your culture doesn’t value medicine, then you’ll end up with a bunch of sick people. If it doesn’t value food, you’ll have some well-fed rich people at the top, and the starving masses at the bottom. Yes, I’m exaggerating, but I think you see my point.
    *incoherent spluttering*
    You see my point. This is one of those subjects where I have strong opinions, I’m just not quite sure what they are :p

  • John

    it’s kind of sweet to see you flail like that.
    It is usually hard to talk across vast gulfs, so some flailing is probably unavoidable. But if you give the other person the benefit of the doubt, assume some honesty on the other side, and try to avoid kneejerk responses, the world can be a better, kinder place. Everyone holds wrong-headed ideas, too, so a bit of humility goes a long way as well. “Who is wise? He who learns from everyone.”

  • inge, creator of heretic pizzas

    Bugmaster, more like, “What kind of pizza you serve and when you serve it is less important than that everyone leaves the table sated and happy.”
    Not being hungry is of intrinsic value. Being happy is of a higher value than being unhappy. But whether this is received by anchovis/blaok olives/caper pizza, kimchi pizza or tomato/basil pizza is morally irrelevant, as is the time you gather to eat.

  • Bugmaster

    “Who is wise? He who learns from everyone.”

    That’s a typical white male oppressive statement. There you go again, assuming that women are so inferior that need to be taught everything, by you. Patriarch scum.
    :-)

  • Spalanzani

    John: “And Jesu, do you react with politeness to people who spew out predigested liberal crap?”
    Isn’t all crap predigested by definition?

  • http://jesurgislac.greatestjournal.com Jesurgislac

    Tell me, Lauren: why does it matter so much more to you that CIA agents definitely involved in horrendous crimes of kidnapping and torture should be presumed innocent till proven guilty, than it matters to you that the men who have been kidnapped and tortured should be presumed innocent until proven guilty?

  • http://jesurgislac.greatestjournal.com Jesurgislac

    Damn, that comment belonged on another thread.
    Spalanzi: Isn’t all crap predigested by definition?
    *facepalm*
    Yeah, and I noticed I’d made that slip seconds after I hit post, and hoped – vainly, on Slactivist – that no one would notice. :-(


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