Yesterday

Time’s Karen Tumulty provides the total vote counts, nationwide, for Super Tuesday. (I’m not sure how these account for caucuses.) Tumulty is focused on the remarkably close race between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, but that’s not what I found most striking.

Here are those same numbers tossed into Word’s graph-maker:

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So Clinton and Obama both received more than twice as many votes as John McCain did yesterday. The overnight spin-chat on MSNBC somehow neglected to mention that. They were more concerned with whether or not the closely contested Democratic race would divide that party, hurting the eventual candidate down the line against McCain and the supposedly united GOP in the general election.

Yet while the Republican outcomes yesterday were more lopsided, the rancor between the factions on that side of the aisle seems much more fierce. The GOP establishment — including talk radio moguls Rush Limbaugh and James Dobson — really dislikes McCain. Wall Street, Club for Growth type Republicans hate Huckabee. The sense I’ve gotten from the Democratic side is that while voters may have real preferences for either Clinton or Obama, there wouldn’t be a lot of wailing or gnashing of teeth if the other one wound up winning the nomination.

Over at Hullabaloo, dday highlights data from a CNN exit poll that indicates my impression is mostly accurate:

Magickareem

There’s no doubt Democrats are torn between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. But the early exit polls show they are not bitterly divided: 72 percent of Democrats said they would be satisfied if Clinton won the party’s nomination, while 71 percent say the same about Obama.

I’d like to see the same response to the Republican version of that question. What percentage of Republican voters would be satisfied with McCain? Or Huckabee? Or Romney? I’d guess that not only would the percentage be lower, but I’d guess the dissatisfaction in that race would be far more vigorous and vehement.

For myself, I’d be more than satisfied with either Obama or Clinton as my party’s nominee. I understand that Magic Johnson is supporting Hillary Clinton. Kareem Abdul Jabaar, meanwhile, is supporting Barack Obama.

That’s the choice: Magic or Kareem.

It’s an understandably tough call, but I’m not complaining about the options.

  • Tonio

    1948?
    Thanks. I remembered Truman, Dewey, and Thurmond, but forgot about Henry Wallace. His popular vote count was almost the same as Thurmond’s but he received no electoral votes.

  • Dash

    Eric B, you sound like the kind of person who might enjoy Andrew Sullivan’s The Conservative Soul if you haven’t already read it. He’s tough on a certain type of conservative Christian–including Catholics–but he is himself a very devout Catholic. You probably won’t agree with everything he says, but he expresses a lot of the same concerns you have mentioned.
    He’s not a red-state inhabitant, though, so he doesn’t have much understanding of the red-state mentality (if there is such a thing): he lives in D.C. (where the folks from the red states send all the people they’d rather not have around at home. Blue states too, come to think of it.)

  • Consumer Unit 5012

    And we read all of this stuff about how dumb and ignorant we were to vote for Bush.
    You forgot “gullible” and “fearful”. And I think history has vindicated us on that point, unfortunately.

  • Consumer Unit 5012

    To add–I can’t really blame anyone for voting for Bush in 2000–he and Gore were doing their level best to pretend to be the same person, and the Liberal Biased Media showed just HOW Liberal they were (not very) by refusing to highlight Bush’s obvious deficiencies.
    By 2004, though, there was really no excuse.

  • Ursula L

    To add–I can’t really blame anyone for voting for Bush in 2000–he and Gore were doing their level best to pretend to be the same person, and the Liberal Biased Media showed just HOW Liberal they were (not very) by refusing to highlight Bush’s obvious deficiencies.
    I’m quite happy to blame people who voted for Bush in 2000.
    Doing even the tiniest amount of research on your own, such as, say, reading anything the two men had individually written (Gore, several lengthy, well-written and well-researched books, Bush, nothing that I could find) is more than enough to show which one actually had a brain.

  • aunursa

    A number of Republicans are resigned to the idea that they are going to lose big in November. They are consoling themselves by trying to compare the Romney 2008 campaign with Reagan 1976.
    Others are still holding out hope that the Democrats will find a way to self-destruct and blow this golden opportunity — particularly if the Dems go with Hillary, a candidate who could motivate the conservative base more than anyone else.

  • bulbul

    Just out of curiosity, aunursa: who are you going to vote for?

  • Tonio

    A number of Republicans are resigned to the idea that they are going to lose big in November.
    My wildest political dream would be the theocrats bolting the GOP for good and fading into history.

  • aunursa

    bulbul: Just out of curiosity, aunursa: who are you going to vote for?
    A good question, since I’m a swing voter. FYI: In six presidential elections, I’ve voted 4 times Democratic, and 2 times Republican. In 7 gubernatorial elections, I’ve voted 4 times Republican, 2 times Democratic, and 1 time I refused to vote because none-of-the-above wasn’t an option. (In the 2003 California recall election, I voted “no” on principle; Gray Davis was a terrible governor, but he hadn’t done anything to merit a recall.)
    The only way I would consider voting for Hillary would be if the Republicans nominate Huckleberry or Paul. Since it’s probably going to be McCain, I’d go with him. If Obama is the Democratic nominee, I’d still be more likely to go with McCain, but Barack would have the opportunity to win me over.

  • aunursa

    Tonio: My wildest political dream would be the theocrats bolting the GOP for good and fading into history.
    That will remain your dream. In reality they would just sit out this election and regroup for 2012.

  • Tonio

    That will remain your dream. In reality they would just sit out this election and regroup for 2012.
    I picture people like Dobson as Constitutional vampires, rising out of their coffins to feast on the First Amendments of the living.

  • aunursa

    Elements of both the left and the right would like to infringe on First Amendment protections.

  • Tonio

    Elements of both the left and the right would like to infringe on First Amendment protections.
    If you’re talking about freedom of speech, I absolutely agree. I was originally referring to the church/state separation.

  • Anonymous

    Imagine being a “red stater” in 2004 and seeing the “United States of Canada” and “Jesusland” map, where some creative genius took the blue states and make them part of Canada and made the red states into Jesusland.
    I remember looking at that map, finding Iowa just outside Jesusland, and thinking, “Phew, dodged a bullet there.”


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