Kindness and necessity

An article in the paper this weekend quoted a religious leader from New Jersey describing the basic message of his faith. "People should have high morals and be kind to each other," he said.

That seems hard to argue with.

So let's argue with it. Because actually this religious leader's formulation bothers me. What troubles me is the way he presents what seem to be two separate, distinct ideas: "high morals" and "kindness."

This doesn't seem to be a matter of repetition for emphasis. The religious leader isn't saying, "People should have high morals by being kind to each other," or "People should have high morals by which we mean be kind to each other." He is suggesting, instead, that there is something called "high morals" that exists and matters beyond the separate something of being kind to each other.

I'll somewhat grudgingly concede that this might be true in some technical sense, but I still don't like the distinction.

Before we get into that, I should note that kindness is a bit of an awkward term here. It tends to convey more an idea of niceness than of goodness — and as Little Red Riding Hood sings in Into the Woods, "nice is different than good."

Kindness seems less robust than, say, a word like justice. But while it may seem to mean less, it can also mean more. It's possible to treat someone justly without also treating them kindly, but if one is to be kind, one must also be just. There's no such thing, after all, as a kindly injustice. Nor is it possible to accept or allow injustice while still being, in any meaningful way, kind. (Stonewall Jackson, the eighth-grader's history book says, was "kind" to his slaves. No. No he wasn't. If he had been kind to them, then they would not have remained his slaves.)

So while kindness may be less comprehensive than love, which is the word I would have preferred to use here, it still seems adequate for the question I'm trying to get at, which is whether it is helpful to speak of a duty to "have high morals" as something that is or can be distinct from the duty to be kind to each other.

To justify the religious leader's formula above, all we really have to do is to find some examples of morality that aren't directly related to the obligation to "be kind to each other."

The most obvious examples of that sort of thing are the sorts of religious duties that I tend to think of as matters of piety rather than of morality (which is not to say that such matters are necessarily lesser just that they are something else). Sabbath-keeping, for example, is regarded as a moral matter for Jews and Christians, but it doesn't seem to be obviously related to or derived from the obligation to be kind to one another.

We can also find plenty of non-sectarian examples of what seem to be moral obligations that have little to do with being kind. Imagine, for example, a lone individual stranded on the proverbial jungle island, living on a diet of fruit, nuts and vegetables and thus, seemingly, freed from any relationship that might require this island dweller to exercise kindness. It still seems possible for such an isolated individual to behave morally or immorally. This hypothetical island-dweller will need to do work — to build a shelter, for example — and that work can be done with care or it can be done carelessly. That care or lack thereof involves a moral component. Care and craft would seem to be another realm of morality that can be considered distinct from being kind to each other.

So technically at least, it would seem that the religious leader's formula is valid. And yet I'm still not happy with it.

Here's why: It is true, as this formula suggests, that "be kind to each other" is not wholly sufficient as an expression of all that morality entails. But while kindness may not be sufficient, it is necessary. If kindness is not quite the whole of "high morals," such high morals cannot exist without it. Kindness — well, here let's use that better word — love may not quite be the only moral duty, but it trumps all others.

Talk of "high morals" as distinct from "be kind to each other" may be technically true, but it opens the door to the danger of allowing those other matters to override that essential duty of kindness.

And we do this all the time. We latch onto the pietistic duties of religion or the secular pieties of craft as thought they somehow exempted us from the obligation of kindness. We use them as excuses for our failure to be kind to each other. Given the choice, or when the need to choose inevitably arises, we opt for "high morals" rather than kindness. That's backwards.

"The sabbath was made for humankind and not humankind for the sabbath." Apart from "be kind to each other," high morals really aren't.

  • chris the cynic

    Launcifer: Not only does it make for a poor reading experience, it makes the characters bad role models for their readers.
    There are, obviously, many problems with Left Behind but if you’re looking at why the main characters are bad role models I think it comes down to one very significant thing: They’re on the wrong side.
    If the writing were better, if the world were more realistic, if the characters were more believable then the RTC characters would be that much more abhorrent.
    They should be preaching more, but other than that they’re doing what they’re supposed to be doing. They’re hiding in their holes and letting God carry out his plan. If they were to try to shield people from God’s wrath they’d be going against God. If they were try to thwart Nicolae’s efforts they’d be trying to screw up God’s plan.
    They want God’s plan to work out. They want these things to come to pass. They want the suffering, they want the persecution. It’s all part of the plan. They’re on the side of the one who has been planning these atrocities for at least two thousand years, more likely since the creation of the universe.
    They cannot do good, because they are not on the side of good.
    Of course, in Left Behind there is no side of good. There is evil (Lucy-Nicky) and more powerful evil (God-Jesus). But that doesn’t mean there couldn’t have been one. The LB protagonists could have gotten together and recognized that there was no force for good in the world and decided to become one. Make earth’s last seven years the best that they can be, help those caught in the war between Nicolae and God. If they did that they’d be nothing like the LB protagonists, which is more or less my point.

  • chris the cynic

    Launcifer: Not only does it make for a poor reading experience, it makes the characters bad role models for their readers.
    There are, obviously, many problems with Left Behind but if you’re looking at why the main characters are bad role models I think it comes down to one very significant thing: They’re on the wrong side.
    If the writing were better, if the world were more realistic, if the characters were more believable then the RTC characters would be that much more abhorrent.
    They should be preaching more, but other than that they’re doing what they’re supposed to be doing. They’re hiding in their holes and letting God carry out his plan. If they were to try to shield people from God’s wrath they’d be going against God. If they were try to thwart Nicolae’s efforts they’d be trying to screw up God’s plan.
    They want God’s plan to work out. They want these things to come to pass. They want the suffering, they want the persecution. It’s all part of the plan. They’re on the side of the one who has been planning these atrocities for at least two thousand years, more likely since the creation of the universe.
    They cannot do good, because they are not on the side of good.
    Of course, in Left Behind there is no side of good. There is evil (Lucy-Nicky) and more powerful evil (God-Jesus). But that doesn’t mean there couldn’t have been one. The LB protagonists could have gotten together and recognized that there was no force for good in the world and decided to become one. Make earth’s last seven years the best that they can be, help those caught in the war between Nicolae and God. If they did that they’d be nothing like the LB protagonists, which is more or less my point.

  • Launcifer

    Jason: Ah, thanks for the clarification, there. I’m afraid I just used the first relevant word that popped into my head, without pausing to question whether or not it was the correct one. I quite like the idea of his being a pastor, actually, because everyone pastor I’ve ever encountered has been a layperson. It feels appropriate, given the apparent level of La Haye’s Biblical scholarship.

  • Launcifer

    Jason: Ah, thanks for the clarification, there. I’m afraid I just used the first relevant word that popped into my head, without pausing to question whether or not it was the correct one. I quite like the idea of his being a pastor, actually, because everyone pastor I’ve ever encountered has been a layperson. It feels appropriate, given the apparent level of La Haye’s Biblical scholarship.

  • hapax

    @Jason — Orthodox (Christian, that is, not Jewish) clergy are also referred to as priests. Also some Lutheran clergy, depending on how “high” the particular variant.
    All of that suggests a view of language that values performance almost to the exclusion of content.
    “In the beginning was Showmanship, and Showmanship was with God, and Showmanship was God … and Showmanship became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld his performance, the performance of one who has picked up some tips from Stanislavski, filled with passion and sincerity.”

  • hapax

    @Jason — Orthodox (Christian, that is, not Jewish) clergy are also referred to as priests. Also some Lutheran clergy, depending on how “high” the particular variant.
    All of that suggests a view of language that values performance almost to the exclusion of content.
    “In the beginning was Showmanship, and Showmanship was with God, and Showmanship was God … and Showmanship became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld his performance, the performance of one who has picked up some tips from Stanislavski, filled with passion and sincerity.”

  • http://www.kitwhitfield.com Kit Whitfield

    the performance of one who has picked up some tips from Stanislavski
    Stanslavski’s a dangerous one, though. It involves emotional memories; the whole idea is to make yourself actually feel what you’re pretending to feel. If you do that, you might wind up empathising with what other people feel…

  • http://www.kitwhitfield.com Kit Whitfield

    the performance of one who has picked up some tips from Stanislavski
    Stanslavski’s a dangerous one, though. It involves emotional memories; the whole idea is to make yourself actually feel what you’re pretending to feel. If you do that, you might wind up empathising with what other people feel…

  • Jessica

    May your anesthesia grant you entertaining hallucinatory experiences, and may your medical staff be considerate and attractive but not disturbingly so.
    LOL When I had my wisdom teeth removed years ago, I went to the maxillo-facial surgeon, and for some reason every single nurse (there were about three, IIRC) was a gorgeous knockout. I can imagine trying to hit on them in my delirium.
    _______________________
    Jason
    Maybe I’m being super nitpicky about connotations, but LaHaye isn’t really a priest.
    No, I think you’re right about the terminology, but I think Launcifer’s point still stands– LaHaye, as a pastor/minister/priest should know something about how to use words.
    Or, on second thought, maybe he’s as clueless as Jerry and that’s why the books are so bad. LaHaye is probably a terrible pastor/speaker and Jenkins can’t write his way out of a paper bag.
    Regarding the assessment of persuasive language skills–
    I’m not sure I completely agree. Even if the entire congregation agrees that abortion is teh evul, then you’ve got to whip them up into a frenzy if you want someone to firebomb the local clinic. The power of words is still important.
    In the case of a congregation that thinks about and challenges what they’re told, the pastor has to construct his statements carefully to make sure that what he says is EXACTLY what he means. In this case, the words may not be any less majestic or inspiring than in the first case, but the argument also has to make sense in a way that maybe a fellow like LaHaye is unfamiliar with.
    By way of example, see the comment upthread about how RTCs condemn homosexual sex just like heterosexual sex when it occurs pre- or extra-maritally. Thanks Tim, but not quite the same thing. Fuck off now. But in his home congregation, that kind of crap would really work. It’s similar to the argument that gay people CAN get married, but only IF they choose a partner of the opposite sex like everyone else has. The whole reason it falls apart is because the argument fails to account for the subject’s object choice. I wouldn’t be surprised if people in LaHaye’s congregation would think that “object choice” is just perverse psycho-babble that we lib’rals use to justify how we all LOVE the cock. One of my new favorite references is the No Longer Quivering blog– it’s a perfect example of how some Christians will turn a completely blind eye to something that doesn’t support their own beliefs (which I think we’ve already said, or rather, that you said).

  • Jessica

    May your anesthesia grant you entertaining hallucinatory experiences, and may your medical staff be considerate and attractive but not disturbingly so.
    LOL When I had my wisdom teeth removed years ago, I went to the maxillo-facial surgeon, and for some reason every single nurse (there were about three, IIRC) was a gorgeous knockout. I can imagine trying to hit on them in my delirium.
    _______________________
    Jason
    Maybe I’m being super nitpicky about connotations, but LaHaye isn’t really a priest.
    No, I think you’re right about the terminology, but I think Launcifer’s point still stands– LaHaye, as a pastor/minister/priest should know something about how to use words.
    Or, on second thought, maybe he’s as clueless as Jerry and that’s why the books are so bad. LaHaye is probably a terrible pastor/speaker and Jenkins can’t write his way out of a paper bag.
    Regarding the assessment of persuasive language skills–
    I’m not sure I completely agree. Even if the entire congregation agrees that abortion is teh evul, then you’ve got to whip them up into a frenzy if you want someone to firebomb the local clinic. The power of words is still important.
    In the case of a congregation that thinks about and challenges what they’re told, the pastor has to construct his statements carefully to make sure that what he says is EXACTLY what he means. In this case, the words may not be any less majestic or inspiring than in the first case, but the argument also has to make sense in a way that maybe a fellow like LaHaye is unfamiliar with.
    By way of example, see the comment upthread about how RTCs condemn homosexual sex just like heterosexual sex when it occurs pre- or extra-maritally. Thanks Tim, but not quite the same thing. Fuck off now. But in his home congregation, that kind of crap would really work. It’s similar to the argument that gay people CAN get married, but only IF they choose a partner of the opposite sex like everyone else has. The whole reason it falls apart is because the argument fails to account for the subject’s object choice. I wouldn’t be surprised if people in LaHaye’s congregation would think that “object choice” is just perverse psycho-babble that we lib’rals use to justify how we all LOVE the cock. One of my new favorite references is the No Longer Quivering blog– it’s a perfect example of how some Christians will turn a completely blind eye to something that doesn’t support their own beliefs (which I think we’ve already said, or rather, that you said).

  • Original Lee

    Michael Mock and others: IIRC, the incident with the hidden manuscript in the Novel in Question is central to one of the plots in the book. The historian who hides the document is writing his dissertation, and he is described as being too in love with his theory to back up and start over. He can’t issue a correction, either, because it’s for his dissertation. The historian who reveals the fraud is asked to review the dissertation at some point, because she has expert knowledge that tells her not only that his theory is wrong but also that he must have seen the hidden document (because he cites other documents from the same collection). The fraudulent historian is expelled, which means he can never get his doctorate, and he takes a job teaching at a secondary school (so he is supporting his family, just not very well). He doesn’t commit suicide until some time later, and his widow is the one who blames the expert historian for “making” him commit suicide.
    WRT to craftmanship as a moral good, I think that the act of creation is a way of interacting with the universe. If you create honestly and attempt to do your best, you are honoring the One who created you and everything else, and you are helping to spread joy, contentment, enlightenment, and all that other good stuff. So an artist who is capable of creating some really amazing paintings in (say) the postmodern ouvre but who instead quickly knocks off reasonably well-done “factory” Impressionist paintings suitable for hotel rooms because that pays better is not being honest with him or herself, or doing his or her best, which is where the craftsmanship argument comes in.
    May I say here that I love this blog? Thursdays are just about my favorite Internet days because of the discussions here, even when they get kinda heated.

  • Original Lee

    Michael Mock and others: IIRC, the incident with the hidden manuscript in the Novel in Question is central to one of the plots in the book. The historian who hides the document is writing his dissertation, and he is described as being too in love with his theory to back up and start over. He can’t issue a correction, either, because it’s for his dissertation. The historian who reveals the fraud is asked to review the dissertation at some point, because she has expert knowledge that tells her not only that his theory is wrong but also that he must have seen the hidden document (because he cites other documents from the same collection). The fraudulent historian is expelled, which means he can never get his doctorate, and he takes a job teaching at a secondary school (so he is supporting his family, just not very well). He doesn’t commit suicide until some time later, and his widow is the one who blames the expert historian for “making” him commit suicide.
    WRT to craftmanship as a moral good, I think that the act of creation is a way of interacting with the universe. If you create honestly and attempt to do your best, you are honoring the One who created you and everything else, and you are helping to spread joy, contentment, enlightenment, and all that other good stuff. So an artist who is capable of creating some really amazing paintings in (say) the postmodern ouvre but who instead quickly knocks off reasonably well-done “factory” Impressionist paintings suitable for hotel rooms because that pays better is not being honest with him or herself, or doing his or her best, which is where the craftsmanship argument comes in.
    May I say here that I love this blog? Thursdays are just about my favorite Internet days because of the discussions here, even when they get kinda heated.

  • Robyrt

    For another, I really don’t think deliberately bad work sells. You can sell a work that’s two-dimensional but pacy, you can sell a work that’s sentimental but charming, you can sell a work that’s not brilliant but has saleable qualities – but writing something deliberately bad figuring it’ll sell is something of a myth, I think.

    With video games, the numbers are very persuasive to support this point. Poor quality is a surefire indicator of poor sales, but good quality does NOT correlate to good sales. There are only three kinds of video games: Straightforward hack jobs, unappreciated critical darlings, and high-quality best-sellers.

  • Robyrt

    For another, I really don’t think deliberately bad work sells. You can sell a work that’s two-dimensional but pacy, you can sell a work that’s sentimental but charming, you can sell a work that’s not brilliant but has saleable qualities – but writing something deliberately bad figuring it’ll sell is something of a myth, I think.

    With video games, the numbers are very persuasive to support this point. Poor quality is a surefire indicator of poor sales, but good quality does NOT correlate to good sales. There are only three kinds of video games: Straightforward hack jobs, unappreciated critical darlings, and high-quality best-sellers.

  • Jason

    @Robyrt-
    That’s because video games are a medium that are pretty much impossible for anyone to find enjoyable when they are poorly made. If the games control is unresponsive or the layout of button is cumbersome or the level design in awkward, it usually makes the game difficult to play and thus repetitive, frustrating and/or boring. Unlike a novel or a movie, video games require you to take an active part of the fictional as a character and if that universe doesn’t make sense or isn’t easy to navigate, you’re not going to want to do that. If you want to see all the ways a horrible game can be so frustrating that its not any fun at all, watch any of the Angry Video Game Nerd’s videos.
    Other fiction on the other hand can still be enjoyed despite being poorly executed, whether that be because its visually appealing (a lot of summer CGI blockbusters), or appeals to some personal fantasy (like Twilight), or can be enjoyed ironically (like the stuff featured on MST3K).
    …and while we’re on video games, for those here that like to play them, if you liked the Ghostbuster movies at all, I highly recommend the new Ghostbusters game.

  • Jason

    @Robyrt-
    That’s because video games are a medium that are pretty much impossible for anyone to find enjoyable when they are poorly made. If the games control is unresponsive or the layout of button is cumbersome or the level design in awkward, it usually makes the game difficult to play and thus repetitive, frustrating and/or boring. Unlike a novel or a movie, video games require you to take an active part of the fictional as a character and if that universe doesn’t make sense or isn’t easy to navigate, you’re not going to want to do that. If you want to see all the ways a horrible game can be so frustrating that its not any fun at all, watch any of the Angry Video Game Nerd’s videos.
    Other fiction on the other hand can still be enjoyed despite being poorly executed, whether that be because its visually appealing (a lot of summer CGI blockbusters), or appeals to some personal fantasy (like Twilight), or can be enjoyed ironically (like the stuff featured on MST3K).
    …and while we’re on video games, for those here that like to play them, if you liked the Ghostbuster movies at all, I highly recommend the new Ghostbusters game.

  • Jessica

    seconding Jason’s love of Ghostbusters. The wii version is very fun once you get used to the controls. Using the nunchuk (?) remote to toss out ghost traps is about the coolest wii-remote action I’ve ever done. ;)

  • Launcifer

    *Quietly puts Ghostbusters on his Christmas list*

  • Launcifer

    *Quietly puts Ghostbusters on his Christmas list*

  • Jeff

    [[The writer who can't sell his Great Novel may be perfectly justified in writing well-crafted genre novels, TV scripts with tight plots and witty dialogue, competent general-readership newspaper stories, etc.]]
    Ted Sturgeon, who wrote beautiful, thoughtful and thought-provoking novels and short-stories also wrote at least one screenplay (and a novella, I think) for Journey to the Bottom of the Monster of the Week Sea.
    ========================
    [[They're always going to sound or look like themselves to some extent.]]
    Not necessarily. Evan Hunter and Ed McBain really didn’t sound much alike in fact, the novel “they wrote together” shifts from one distinct voice to the other). I haven’t read much Richard Bachman, but what I have doesn’t sound much like Steven King.

  • Jeff

    [[The writer who can't sell his Great Novel may be perfectly justified in writing well-crafted genre novels, TV scripts with tight plots and witty dialogue, competent general-readership newspaper stories, etc.]]
    Ted Sturgeon, who wrote beautiful, thoughtful and thought-provoking novels and short-stories also wrote at least one screenplay (and a novella, I think) for Journey to the Bottom of the Monster of the Week Sea.
    ========================
    [[They're always going to sound or look like themselves to some extent.]]
    Not necessarily. Evan Hunter and Ed McBain really didn’t sound much alike in fact, the novel “they wrote together” shifts from one distinct voice to the other). I haven’t read much Richard Bachman, but what I have doesn’t sound much like Steven King.

  • Lurker

    Jason,
    you did the right thing when you did not report the guy who saved his cat. However, did he really commit a crime? In many European countries, there is the civil law concept of Notstand or a state of emergency. If there is an immediate threat to a significant lawful right, you may violate another’s less signinficant right without consequences. However, the seemingly illegal action must be minimal and the only useful way of action.
    For example, if your house is on fire, you may break into neighbour’s house to call the fire department, and no crime has been committed. (Your house is much more important than neighbour’s window.) Similarly, should you, in the winter, fall through ice and get wet (a life-threathening situation), you may break into an empty summer cottage, if that is the only way to get warm. (Your life is more important some one else’s cottage.)

  • Lurker

    Jason,
    you did the right thing when you did not report the guy who saved his cat. However, did he really commit a crime? In many European countries, there is the civil law concept of Notstand or a state of emergency. If there is an immediate threat to a significant lawful right, you may violate another’s less signinficant right without consequences. However, the seemingly illegal action must be minimal and the only useful way of action.
    For example, if your house is on fire, you may break into neighbour’s house to call the fire department, and no crime has been committed. (Your house is much more important than neighbour’s window.) Similarly, should you, in the winter, fall through ice and get wet (a life-threathening situation), you may break into an empty summer cottage, if that is the only way to get warm. (Your life is more important some one else’s cottage.)

  • Tricksterson, Commander of the Evil Clown Brigade, Keeper of the Death Sheep and Minion of MG

    Journey to the Bottom of the Monster of the Week? That has implications that I’d rather not explore.

  • Tricksterson, Commander of the Evil Clown Brigade, Keeper of the Death Sheep and Minion of MG

    Journey to the Bottom of the Monster of the Week? That has implications that I’d rather not explore.

  • Jason

    @Lurker-
    It was Joshua who posted the story about the cat, not me.

  • Jason

    @Lurker-
    It was Joshua who posted the story about the cat, not me.

  • http://www.mockwriting.com/ Michael Mock, Sensei of the Slacktidojo and self-appointed member of the Cabal of Antichrists

    Kit Whitefield – For one thing, I don’t think it’s very easy for a good artist to produce deliberately bad work.
    I’m only quoting this bit because I can’t see a good way to summarize the rest of your points, but that particular post points up a lot of my objections to the structure of the original question.
    There’s an implicit assumption in the original setup that one can tell the difference between “great” art and “lesser” art. I think that’s very questionable, and dangerously close to trying to arbitrate what constitutes “real” art.
    One of my big objections (which I was clumsily working my way towards in my previous posts) is the simple fact that “good” is a very subjective quality, especially when it comes to art. If our hypothetical artist can’t make a living producing (what he considers) his best work (abstract paintings, let’s say), but can earn a living producing, say, well-crafted portraits… Then it looks to me as though a non-trivial portion of the population considers the portraits “better” than his abstract work.

  • Kate

    The problem is the different definitions of “theory” when used by the general population versus by scientists. To the general population “theory” means rough idea that may or may not be correct. This is what scientists would term “hypothesis.” To scientists, a theory is a statement with so much evidence supporting it that it is essentially a known “fact.”

  • Kate

    The problem is the different definitions of “theory” when used by the general population versus by scientists. To the general population “theory” means rough idea that may or may not be correct. This is what scientists would term “hypothesis.” To scientists, a theory is a statement with so much evidence supporting it that it is essentially a known “fact.”

  • http://mikailborg.livejournal.com MikhailBorg

    Kit, Jason, MercuryBlue, mst3kharris, Wenzer, Robert Ligouri, redcrow, Jeff, JI, hapax, Michael Mock, Julie paradox, Jessica, Joshua, bluefrog, Amaryllis, Anton Mates, and anyone I missed, thank you so very much. Just typing up this list is a cheering experience!
    I’m mostly optimistic, and the doctor thinks my prognosis is excellent, but there’s a part of me that just wants to FREAK OUT every time the word ‘cancer’ is said. Everyone’s good wishes are doing a lot to keep that part calm. (One of my friends suggested we just start calling it something non-threatening like ‘cupcake’ – and darned if that’s not catching on!)
    May your anesthesia grant you entertaining hallucinatory experiences, and may your medical staff be considerate and attractive but not disturbingly so.
    Yes to this! My recovery from the heavy doses of morphine accompanying my first hip surgery convinced me that I never wanted to play with narcotics! As to disturbingly attractive medical staff, I have some friends who cosplay and who possess twisted senses of humor (much like mine). They’ve been teasing me that once I’m safely home from the hospital, but still restricted to bed rest for a few weeks, I’ll get a special visit to encourage my quick recovery… :D

  • http://mikailborg.livejournal.com MikhailBorg

    Kit, Jason, MercuryBlue, mst3kharris, Wenzer, Robert Ligouri, redcrow, Jeff, JI, hapax, Michael Mock, Julie paradox, Jessica, Joshua, bluefrog, Amaryllis, Anton Mates, and anyone I missed, thank you so very much. Just typing up this list is a cheering experience!
    I’m mostly optimistic, and the doctor thinks my prognosis is excellent, but there’s a part of me that just wants to FREAK OUT every time the word ‘cancer’ is said. Everyone’s good wishes are doing a lot to keep that part calm. (One of my friends suggested we just start calling it something non-threatening like ‘cupcake’ – and darned if that’s not catching on!)
    May your anesthesia grant you entertaining hallucinatory experiences, and may your medical staff be considerate and attractive but not disturbingly so.
    Yes to this! My recovery from the heavy doses of morphine accompanying my first hip surgery convinced me that I never wanted to play with narcotics! As to disturbingly attractive medical staff, I have some friends who cosplay and who possess twisted senses of humor (much like mine). They’ve been teasing me that once I’m safely home from the hospital, but still restricted to bed rest for a few weeks, I’ll get a special visit to encourage my quick recovery… :D

  • http://www.mockwriting.com/ Michael Mock, Sensei of the Slacktidojo and self-appointed member of the Cabal of Antichrists

    Mikhail Borg – As to disturbingly attractive medical staff, I have some friends who cosplay and who possess twisted senses of humor (much like mine). They’ve been teasing me that once I’m safely home from the hospital, but still restricted to bed rest for a few weeks, I’ll get a special visit to encourage my quick recovery…
    Everybody needs friends like this. {g} And do keep us posted, neh?

  • http://www.mockwriting.com/ Michael Mock, Sensei of the Slacktidojo and self-appointed member of the Cabal of Antichrists

    Mikhail Borg – As to disturbingly attractive medical staff, I have some friends who cosplay and who possess twisted senses of humor (much like mine). They’ve been teasing me that once I’m safely home from the hospital, but still restricted to bed rest for a few weeks, I’ll get a special visit to encourage my quick recovery…
    Everybody needs friends like this. {g} And do keep us posted, neh?

  • Robert Liguori, Who May Still Have His Harem-Girl Outfit Around Somewhere

    They’ve been teasing me that once I’m safely home from the hospital, but still restricted to bed rest for a few weeks, I’ll get a special visit to encourage my quick recovery… :D
    Is the idea to entice you out of bed, or to scare you out of bed? Or is this the set of friends for which these concepts are not mutually exclusive?

  • Robert Liguori, Who May Still Have His Harem-Girl Outfit Around Somewhere

    They’ve been teasing me that once I’m safely home from the hospital, but still restricted to bed rest for a few weeks, I’ll get a special visit to encourage my quick recovery… :D
    Is the idea to entice you out of bed, or to scare you out of bed? Or is this the set of friends for which these concepts are not mutually exclusive?

  • http://mikailborg.livejournal.com/ MikhailBorg

    Or is this the set of friends for which these concepts are not mutually exclusive?
    It is indeed that group. If it really does happen, I’m confident I’l find the experience memorable.

  • http://mikailborg.livejournal.com/ MikhailBorg

    Or is this the set of friends for which these concepts are not mutually exclusive?
    It is indeed that group. If it really does happen, I’m confident I’l find the experience memorable.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/rajexplorer Raj

    MikhailBorg, I hope you’re recovering nicely.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/rajexplorer Raj

    MikhailBorg, I hope you’re recovering nicely.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/tukla_in_iowa Naked Bunny with a Whip

    /me plays “Good Vibrations”, tries beaming them at MikhailBorg

  • http://mikailborg.livejournal.com/ MikhailBorg

    Raj, I thank you, but the surgery’s next month – in fact, I just got the date yesterday. They’ll be cutting me open on the 11th, and they hope to have me home by the 15th or the 16th. Then three-four weeks of bed rest – I suspect I’ll be quite grateful for laptops, my World of Warcraft account, and my anime backlog!

  • http://mikailborg.livejournal.com/ MikhailBorg

    Raj, I thank you, but the surgery’s next month – in fact, I just got the date yesterday. They’ll be cutting me open on the 11th, and they hope to have me home by the 15th or the 16th. Then three-four weeks of bed rest – I suspect I’ll be quite grateful for laptops, my World of Warcraft account, and my anime backlog!

  • KellyK

    I just want to echo the good wishes to MikhailBorg. I hope that your surgery is successful, your recovery is quick, and you don’t go stir crazy during your bed-rest. (Probably a good time to come up with a ridiculously time-consuming WoW goal, like picking up a rare mount or earning the cash for a motorcycle.)

  • KellyK

    I just want to echo the good wishes to MikhailBorg. I hope that your surgery is successful, your recovery is quick, and you don’t go stir crazy during your bed-rest. (Probably a good time to come up with a ridiculously time-consuming WoW goal, like picking up a rare mount or earning the cash for a motorcycle.)


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